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Linux Foundation Leftovers

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OSS
  • Harbor Container Registry Project Advances

    An initiative focused on developing an open source registry that makes it easier to manage containers at scale has been updated.

    Harbor, developed by VMware, is now a incubation project being developed under the auspices for the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). The 1.9 release of Harbor adds a range of capabilities, including a Webhook notification that can be employed to integrate the registry more easily with continuous integration/continuous deployment (CI/CD) tools.

    Other capabilities available in this latest release include the ability to replicate projects between the registry services of major cloud service providers, tag retention and project quotas that strengthen image lifecycle management and security, syslog integration and the ability to apply exceptions that would allow developers to continue to employ a container with a known bug.

  • Facebook, Uber, Twitter and Alibaba form Presto Foundation to Tackle Distributed Data Processing at Scale
  • IOTA unleashes Fast Probabilistic Consensus Simulator; the Linux deal will greatly aid MIOTA in the long run

    IOTA is ranked at #16 to the south of Huobi Token and TRON in the market. This virtual currency was in the green zone a few hours ago but has since declined at a rate of 0.55% which led to MIOTA dropping to reach $0.262404 where it presently rests. The trading volume recorded stands at roughly $3.629 million, whereas the supply has approximately 2.779 billion MIOTA tokens in play for now. The total market cap of IOTA is $729.358 million as of this very moment.

  • LF Edge Continues Rapid Growth as New Projects, Members Collaborate at Open Source Edge

    LF Edge, an umbrella organization within the Linux Foundation, announced continued project momentum with the addition of two new projects and four new members.

  • Open standards model for VNFs is a boon to open source networking

    The model will drastically streamline the compliance and verification process of bringing virtual network functions to market
    Linux Foundation Networking, together with the GSMA, has created the first standardised compliance and verification model to help network operators and equipment vendors approve networking apps and increase time-to-revenue.

    The model created by the Common NFVI Telco Taskforce (CNTT) replaces the pre-existing method whereby vendors bring virtual network functions (VNFs) to network operators, which then need to be tested before they can be deployed. As the type of tests required varies by operator, this could be a very lengthy process, whereas the new open model provides a single top-line test to be applied across the whole industry.

    The new model will allow operators and vendors to profit more quickly from their VNFs and then re-invest that profit back into the open source life cycle, ultimately fuelling more rapid industry growth.

    "The speed with which this group has been established and produced its first tangible results are a testament to the close cooperation and collaboration of its industry members," said Alex Sinclair, CTO of GSMA. "A common framework and approach will accelerate adoption and deployment in the 5G era and we look forward to aligning further with our partners on this important project."

  • Operator-Led Effort Hosted by Linux Foundation and GSMA publishes Initial Specifications for Common NFV Infrastructure, Empowered by LFN's OVP Framework

Alibaba

  • Alibaba, Global Tech Giants Form Foundation for Open-Source Database Tool

    Chinese internet giant Alibaba has joined forces with Facebook, Twitter, and Uber to set up a foundation for the Facebook-developed database search engine and processing tool Presto, according to a Monday announcement by U.S.-based nonprofit the Linux Foundation.

    The Presto Foundation aims to make the engine — which can scour multiple different data sources and formats and help analyze them — the “fastest and most reliable” of its kind. Presto will have its own project within the Linux Foundation, the announcement said.

    Presto was developed in 2012 for large-scale data processing by Facebook, which opened the source code up to developers the following year in the hope companies that rely on the technology would help to hone it.

LFN

  • Common NFVI Telco Taskforce (CNTT) Boasts Reference Milestone

    LF Networking (LFN) and the GSMA today announced that the Common NFVI Telco Taskforce (CNTT) has reached its first major milestone with the publication of its initial common Reference Model and first Reference Architecture. Jointly hosted by the GSMA and the Linux Foundation, CNTT operates as an open committee responsible for creating and documenting an industry-aligned Common NFVI Framework.

Open Source Networking Industry Rapidly (In Some Cases)

  • Open Source Networking Industry Rapidly (In Some Cases) Moves To The Edge

    At its annual European knees up, the Linux Foundation’s Open Networking Summit set out its stall as to how it will address the needs of next generation connectivity, AI and rapidly advancing edge deployments.

    Illustrating the priority of moving to the edge in open source networking thinking, is the announcement at the annual Open Networking Summit (ONS) Europe that the event will be called the Open Networking and Edge Summit from 2020.

    At his keynote at this week’s summit in Antwerp, Begium, Arpit Joshipura, general manager for networking at The Linux Foundation, outlined the importance of collaboration across the edge ecosystem as open source network developers scaled up their projects to cover everything from the enterprise to the cloud and the edge, whether that was for 5G, IoT, AI analytics or the evolution of driverless cars.

    He even suggested that those traditionally slow moving beasts, the telcos, were starting to catch up with the cloud hyperscalers when it came to extending their coverage in supporting connectivity to the above leading edge applications.

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More in Tux Machines

GNU and OSS Leftovers

  • Nick Richards: Linux Application Summit 2019

    It was a great conference with a diverse crew of people who all care about making apps on Linux better. I particularly enjoyed Frank’s keynote on Linux apps from the perspective of Nextcloud, an Actual ISV. Also worth your time is Rob’s talk on how Flathub would like to help more developers earn money from their work; Adrien on GTK and scalable UIs for phones; Robin on tone of voice and copywriting; Emel on Product Management in the context of GNOME Recipes and Paul Brown on direct language and better communication. There were also great lightning talks including a starring turn by one of my former colleagues Martin Abente Lahaye who showed off the work he’s been doing to make the Sugar educational applications more widely available with Flatpak. After a bit of review and some polish in the cafe they’re now starting to appear on Flathub. All of these videos are available to watch in the YouTube livestream playback, and I’m sure individually soon when appropriately processed. I gave a talk entitled Product Management In Open Source. Astute readers will recognise the title from the similar talk I gave last year at GUADEC, however the content is actually fairly different. Emel’s talk that I mentioned above covered quite a lot of the basic material so I concentrated more on how individual app developers could use Product Management techniques to make their own practice a bit more deliberate and help them guide and prioritize their work.

  • Collabora sponsoring LibreOffice Developer Bootcamp in Ankara

    On November 13 more than 120 students in Ankara Hacettepe University’s Beytepe Campus joined the first session of the LibreOffice Developer Bootcamp, a course for students with interest in C++. There is a session every week, until the end of the semester.

  • Why AI Should Be Our Ally, Not Our Enemy

    Community-driven open source projects are at the forefront of innovation of virtually every leading technology trend. The fields of AI, ML, deep learning, predictive analysis, and neural networks are no exception. It’s also worth noting that HPC is a vital element for successfully delivering AI and ML. Both rely on high levels of compute capacity for fast analysis of huge datasets – and Linux is at the heart of all the top-performing HPC solutions. Just this week, the latest TOP500 list of supercomputers was released. It was no surprise to see that, yet again, every one of the world’s fastest computers run on Linux.

  • Come together for free software

    Here at the Free Software Foundation (FSF), we strongly believe that one person can make a difference. Our main task, as the principal organization in the fight for user freedom, is one of connection; to bring people together around an unwavering set of principles. We will achieve global software freedom by staying the course, by focusing on education, and by making tools and solutions available, all by working together with this passionate and diverse community.

  • GNU Health patchset 3.6.1 released !

    GNU Health 3.6.1 patchset has been released !

  • Google Shakes Up Its 'TGIF'—and Ends Its Culture of Openness

    Pichai cited decreased attendance rates, the difficulty of running a real-time gathering across time zones, and an uptick in meetings among big product groups like Cloud or YouTube. His most resonant reason, however, was that Google employees could no longer be trusted to keep matters confidential. He cited “a coordinated effort to share our conversations outside of the company after every TGIF ... it has affected our ability to use TGIF as a forum for candid conversations on important topics.” He also noted that while many want to hear about product launches and business strategies, some attend to “hear answers on other topics.” It seems obvious he was referring to recent moments when aggrieved employees registered objections to Google’s policies and missteps—on developing a search engine for China, bestowing millions of dollars to executives charged with sexual misconduct, or hiring a former Homeland Security apparatchik. Pichai says Google may address such issues in specific town-hall meetings when warranted.

Programming Leftovers

  • Using cURL in Python with PycURL

    In this tutorial, we are going to learn how to use PycURL, which is an interface to the cURL library in Python. cURL is a tool used for transferring data to and from a server and for making various types of data requests. PycURL is great for testing REST APIs, downloading files, and so on. Some developers prefer using Postman for testing APIs but PycURL is another suitable option to do so as it supports multiple protocols like FILE, FTPS, HTTPS, IMAP, POP3, SMTP, SCP, SMB, etc. Moreover, PycURL comes in handy when a lot of concurrent, fast, and reliable connections are required. As mentioned above, PycURL is an interface to the libcURL library in Python; therefore PycURL inherits all the capabilities of libcURL. PycURL is extremely fast (it is known to be much faster than Requests, which is a Python library for HTTP requests), has multiprotocol support, and also contains sockets for supporting network operations.

  • Faster Winter 3: Difference Lists

    Today, we will tackle the big bad memory leak that eats up my laptop’s memory. A quick look at the heap profile (+RTS -h) showed that the memory was filling up with lists. Not very helpful, as lists are everywhere. So I looked through the hot code of the interpreter, eval, step and instr in Wasm.Exec.Eval to see if anything fishy is going on. I found some uses of the list concatenation operator (++) – always a bad sign, as it has to traverse the list on its left completely! And often the solution is pretty simple: Use difference lists! It’s even simpler than the name makes it sound like. It does not require you to import anything new, and works well everywhere where you assemble a list in multiple stages, but use it, in its full form, only once at the end.

  • Fabric-licious Raspberry Pi projects - Raspberry Pi

    I’m currently (re)learning how to knit. Here are some textile-themed Raspberry Pi projects for the yarn-curious.

  • [ Perl | Raku | The ] Weekly Challenge - 2020

    It has been wonderful journey so far in the year 2019. When I started the journey in March, I didn’t know it would take this shape. All credit goes to the support of Perl/Raku community in general. It would be unfair if I pick few names. You know who I am talking about anyway. Let me share the story with you all.

Audiocasts/Shows: System76, Pinebook and "The Linux Defender"

3 emerging open source projects to keep an eye on

The exciting thing about open source is that nobody needs permission to try something new. That's a formula that allows new ideas to emerge all the time. Here are three open source projects that are still in their early stages but show real promise. This Linux is utterly unapologetic in catering to technology hobbyists, enthusiasts, and power users. It's for the amateurs, in that best and most original sense of the word—those who love what they do. Awesome. So isn't Endeavour the perfect name? If what you want is to roll your sleeves up and level up while still enjoying a gentle start and a friendly community, this could be a great way to go about it. Read more