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Windows Mobile 5.0 is vulnerable

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Microsoft

Nearly a month ago, Bill Gates presented the new version of the Windows Mobile 5.0 operating system, a solution touted as being significantly improved.

The new version allows a better customization of the handsets, offers an optimum integration of applications and improved support for multimedia experiences and for the enterprise type applications.

Microsoft has produced over 1 million operating systems

for handsets in the previous quarter in Europe only, but the demand is much more diversified now; there are 40 producers of devices that will be used in 68 networks from 48 countries.

Taking all these aspects into consideration, an improved operating system was absolutely necessary, just as optimized security parameters were mandatory.

Windows Mobile 5.0 Messaging and Security Feature Pack (MSFP) don't succeed to meet the security requirements of an enterprise environment. The application has been announced for the fourth quarter of this year. Theoretically, the solution should offer push-email in conjunction with Exchange Server 2003 SP2, better administration, optimized security and superior control for all Windows Mobile 5.0 devices.

Unfortunately, according to experts, Microsoft has missed the opportunity of proving that it has the ability to be the leader of this segment, the security solution being a disappointment because of the absence of vital security features. MSFP should have included integrated management tools and a series of security measures for the platform.

The experts recommend the employment of solutions developed by third party companies for using the device in enterprise environments.

Source.

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