Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Pardus gives Linux a custom lift

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Apart from a KDE desktop and applications, the developers of the Pardus 2007 Linux distribution have built an entire distribution from scratch. Pardus, released last month, has its own multilingual installer, custom dependency-resolving package manager, and an INIT system that slashes boot times by several seconds. The distribution has come a long way since its first release in 2005, when it was based on Gentoo and lacked a package manager. Thanks to its custom tools, it's one of the easiest Linux distribution to run and manage.

Most of the custom tools in Pardus are written in Python. The first you'll run into is the distribution installer YALI, Yet Another Linux Installer. It's easy to navigate through, with clear installation instructions. You can use YALI to resize NTFS partitions to make space for Pardus. The Zorg script handles Xorg configuration and configures the best settings for the monitor and graphics card during installation.

Pardus also offers faster boot times, thanks to its Mudur init system. The package manager, PiSi (Packages Installed Successfully, as Intended), installs, removes, and upgrades packages, automatically resolving dependencies. It can be configured and used from the command line or through a graphical interface.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Black Duck's Free Tool Digs Out Open Source Bugs

The main advantage of such tools is ease of use. The main limitation is that a tool is only as effective as its creators' list of vulnerabilities. Using a given tool implies that you trust the vendor to stay alert and on the job, noted King. Developers have "a ton of other similar offerings out there," he said. By offering a free scanner, Black Duck can draw attention to its other products. "If the new tool delivers what the company promises, it will help put the company in good stead with customer developers. Satisfied customers tend to be repeat customers," King said. Read more

Today in Techrights