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Pardus gives Linux a custom lift

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Linux
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Apart from a KDE desktop and applications, the developers of the Pardus 2007 Linux distribution have built an entire distribution from scratch. Pardus, released last month, has its own multilingual installer, custom dependency-resolving package manager, and an INIT system that slashes boot times by several seconds. The distribution has come a long way since its first release in 2005, when it was based on Gentoo and lacked a package manager. Thanks to its custom tools, it's one of the easiest Linux distribution to run and manage.

Most of the custom tools in Pardus are written in Python. The first you'll run into is the distribution installer YALI, Yet Another Linux Installer. It's easy to navigate through, with clear installation instructions. You can use YALI to resize NTFS partitions to make space for Pardus. The Zorg script handles Xorg configuration and configures the best settings for the monitor and graphics card during installation.

Pardus also offers faster boot times, thanks to its Mudur init system. The package manager, PiSi (Packages Installed Successfully, as Intended), installs, removes, and upgrades packages, automatically resolving dependencies. It can be configured and used from the command line or through a graphical interface.

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