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Video/Audio: 'Agony Unrated' on GNU/Linux, Noodlings and Destination Linux

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Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

  • Gumstix Introduces CM4 to CM3 Adapter, Carrier Boards for Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

    Raspberry Pi Trading has just launched 32 different models of Raspberry Pi CM4 and CM4Lite systems-on-module, as well as the “IO board” carrier board. But the company has also worked with third-parties, and Gumstix, an Altium company, has unveiled four different carrier boards for the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4, as well as a convenient CM4 to CM3 adapter board that enables the use of Raspberry Pi CM4 on all/most carrier boards for the Compute Module 3/3+.

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  • Raspberry Pi CM4 and CM4Lite Modules Launched for $25 and Up

    We were expecting Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 sometimes next year, but Raspberry Pi Trading Limited managed to launch the new module much earlier, as Raspberry Pi CM4 and CM4Lite modules have just been launched with a new, much more compact form factor incompatible with the earlier Compute Modules, an I/O board making use of the new features, and a choice of 32 models with variations in terms of memory and storage capacity, as well as the presence or lack thereof of a WiFi and Bluetooth wireless module.

Kernel: UNIX Time, Bluetooth Bug, Char/Misc and Intel

      
  • Linux 5.10 Solves the Year 2038 Problem Till Year 2486

    The Year 2000 problem was one of the most severe issues in programs of computerized systems that created havoc in computers and affecting systems worldwide. A little background on why this problem emerged — Ever noticed when a computer or a website asks you to enter the last two digits of the year? Computers are programmed to store only the last two digits of years because it saves storage space (Four digits Vs. Two digits). Say there’s only one day left in the year 1999 (99); a day later, the systems would fail to understand if it’s the Year 2000 (00) or 1900 (00).

  • Linux 5.9.1 And Older Stable Kernel Updates Fixing "Bleeding Tooth" Bluetooth Vulnerability Are Available - LinuxReviews

    BleedingTooth is a really bad and in theory very serious Linux kernel vulnerability. It allows someone within Bluetooth range to potentially execute code on your Linux machine thanks to a combination of improper input validation, improper buffer restrictions and improper access control in the BlueZ libraries and heap-based type confusion in the Linux kernel's L2CAP code. The practical threat isn't all that. Linux 5.9.1 as well as updates to the older "stable" kernel series (5.8.16, 5.4.72, 4.19.152, 4.14.202, 4.9.240, and 4.4.240) have been released with a patch by Intel's Luiz Augusto von Dentz addressing the Linux kernel side of the BleedingTooth vulnerability. You should upgrade to one of those if your machine has a Bluetooth adapter (most laptops do). 

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  • Char/Misc With Linux 5.10 Brings Nitro Enclaves, Alder Lake, More Code For Gaudi - Phoronix

    The "char/misc" area within the Linux kernel continues to have a bit of everything as the "catch all" pull request of the kernel not fitting into other existing subsystems.  [...] - Qualcomm's MHI bus added in Linux 5.7 supports more features with Linux 5.10 albeit mostly lower-level changes.  - The Intel-owned Habana Labs continues working extensively on their upstream kernel driver supporting their AI inference and training accelerators. With Linux 5.10 is a wide range of improvements to the Habana Labs kernel code largely on the Gaudi side.  - The SoundWire code has gained support for run-time power management, including within the Intel SoundWire support paths. The Intel code also adds multi-link support and other improvements. 

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  • Linux 5.10 Continues Bringing Up Support For Intel's Rocket Lake - Phoronix

    Building off Linux 5.9 that featured initial support for Gen12 graphics on next year's Rocket Lake desktop platform along with other early enablement for Rocket Lake like RAPL support and other PCI ID additions, that work has continued for the Linux 5.10 cycle.  The libata pull adds Rocket Lake PCH-H RAID PCI IDs as one of the additions.  There is also the platform-drivers-x86 work for Linux 5.10 where Rocket Lake support is added to the intel_pmc_core driver.  While the DRM code in Linux 5.9 brought initial support for Rocket Lake building off the existing Gen12 code, the DRM code for Linux 5.10 also has necessary code changes for properly driving displays with the hardware. 

Android Leftovers

Graphics: Vulkan, Intel and NVIDIA

  • Vulkan 1.2.158 Released With Fragment Shading Rate Extension - Phoronix

    Vulkan 1.2.158 was released this morning with two notable extensions introduced. First up is VK_KHR_fragment_shading_rate that allows changing the rate at which fragments are shaded. Multiple pixels can be shaded now by a single fragment shader invocation. The new extension allows controlling the fragment shading rate on a per-draw, per-primitive, or per-region basis. Most notably this can be used by Vulkan-powered games for shading higher levels of detail in a scene compared to others. Or rather lower quality shading in some areas of the scene.

  • Linux 5.10 Continues Bringing Up Support For Intel's Rocket Lake - Phoronix

    Building off Linux 5.9 that featured initial support for Gen12 graphics on next year's Rocket Lake desktop platform along with other early enablement for Rocket Lake like RAPL support and other PCI ID additions, that work has continued for the Linux 5.10 cycle. The libata pull adds Rocket Lake PCH-H RAID PCI IDs as one of the additions. There is also the platform-drivers-x86 work for Linux 5.10 where Rocket Lake support is added to the intel_pmc_core driver.

  • GCC's Ada Frontend Seeing More Work On NVIDIA CUDA Support - Phoronix

    Should you want to use the Ada programming language for GPU programming, the GCC compiler has been working on CUDA support within its front-end for this safety and security minded language. In the past born out of academia there's been CUDA Ada bindings. There has also been Ada/SPARK GPU programming initiatives in the past with various APIs. This latest still ongoing effort is wiring up the GCC Ada front-end with CUDA support.

  • You may want to avoid Linux Kernel 5.9 if you want fully supported NVIDIA drivers | GamingOnLinux

    On the official NVIDIA forum, an employee put out an announcement warning NVIDIA GPU owners that the Linux Kernel 5.9 and later is currently unsupported. It's worth noting they posted that in the CUDA forum, so other workloads like gaming may work as normal. In the post they mention Kernel 5.9+ is currently "incompatible" with any of their drivers, and they're suggesting to wait until "mid-November" for a fresh NVIDIA driver update which is expected to bring support for it. They're "working diligently" to get ready to support it.