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IBM, Red Hat and 'Drones for Good' (DroneAid)

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS
  • Open Source is the Building Block for Digital Transformation

    According to Damien Wong, Vice President and General Manager, Asian Growth and Emerging Markets, Red Hat, both IBM and Red Hat believe that the multi-cloud approach is the way forward and they aim to become the leading hybrid and multi-cloud provider.
    “Red Hat is still Red Hat. We are true to our principals. We keep our own brand and keep Red Hat developer programs. We remain neutral and independent. And yes, we will compete with IBM.”
    Having said that at a media session during the Red Hat Forum in Kuala Lumpur, Damien added that innovation today needs to be scaled safely. And one of the best ways to that is with open source. By being able to share ideas and innovations, organisations and developers will be able to overcome the challenges of discovery and creation.

    [...]

    “This is a clear endorsement of our strategy being the right one. If you are leading in a race, and no one is chasing you, you’re probably going the wrong direction. But if others are catching up, you are on the right path. This is the right direction and with everyone playing catch up, it’s only a great thing for the community. Participation and robust collaboration among commercial competitors will make it stronger.”

  • TOKAI Group Adopts Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated for Fully-Managed Enterprise Kubernetes

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that TOKAI Group, a group of consolidated subsidiary companies under TOKAI Holdings Corporation, has selected Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated as its overall development and operations infrastructure. With the leading enterprise Kubernetes platform as its primary container platform, TOKAI Group has used the platform to integrate the disparate web applications built by its respective group companies.

  • Submissions Open for 2020 Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year Award

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that submissions are being accepted for the 14th annual Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year Award.

    The Red Hat Certified Professional (RHCP) of the Year Award recognizes the hard work, expertise and ingenuity of a current Red Hat Certified Professional. The award program is open to holders of a current Red Hat certification or Certificate of Expertise in eligible countries. The certification must also be current during the 2020 Red Hat Summit event.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: DroneAid

    This week’s SD Times open-source project of the week is an IBM hackathon winning project that uses visual recognition to detect and count SOS icons on the ground from drone streams overhead to help first responders plot rescue actions. 

    DroneAid was developed by developer Pedro Cruz after he witnessed Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and saw how people in rural areas desperately wrote signs seeking food and water so that planes and helicopters could see their messages. 

    “I thought that drones could be the perfect solution for rapidly assessing damages from the air and they could help with capturing images that could then be processed by AI computer vision systems,” Cruz wrote in a blog post that described the steps that were necessary to complete the project.  

  • Drones for Good: DroneAid Goes OpenSource

    Perhaps one of the most inspiring Drones for Good stories we’ve heard in the last few years is that of Pedro Cruz, a Puerto Rican native who responded to the devastation of 2017’s Hurricane Maria by creating DroneAid, a tool designed to communicate SOS signs on the ground to first responders, during a Call for Code Hackathon.  Now a full-time IBM developer, Pedro Cruz is bringing DroneAid to the open source community – making it available to as many people as possible.

  • Hurricane Maria survivor designs DroneAid open source disaster relief tool

    Pedro Cruz spent weeks after Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico in September 2017 helping bring food and water to people trapped in remote areas. 

    He quickly realized he could use an airborne drone to help, using its video connection to read dozens of messages painted on the ground asking rescue crews to bring water, food or medicine. 

    It wasn’t until nearly a year after the hurricane devastated the island territory in September 2017 that Cruz figured out a way to connect his drone to disaster aid through a computerized visual recognition tool.

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[libre-riscv-dev] power pc

So as you know, the RISCV Foundation is seriously impeding progress. There
is huge momentum around RISCV itself, however as far as open *innovation*
is concerned, the sheer arrogance of the Foundation in failing to respect
the combination of Libre goals and business objectives has us completely
isolated from key critical resources such as the closed secret lists and
wiki.

We cannot even get access to documentation explaining how to propose new
extensions.

I have been considering for some time to reach out to MIPS and PowerPC.
Yesterday I wrote to the OpenPower Foundation and was really surprised and
delighted to hear back from Hugh Blemings, whom I worked with over 20 years
ago.

I outlined some conditions (no NDAs, open mailing lists, use of
Certification Marks and Compliance Suites) and he replied back that this
was pretty much along the lines of what they were planning.

I will have a chat with him some time, in the meantime I found the spec:

https://openpowerfoundation.org/?resource_lib=power-isa-version-3-0

It is eeenooormous, however Hugh reassures me that they want to break it
into sections.

Why would we even consider this?

The lesson from RISCV is really clear: if the ISA is set up as a cartel,
Libre innovation is not welcome.

If we had a goal to just *implement* a *pre existing* Extension, there
would be no problem.

It is the fact that we wish to implement entirely new extensions, for CPU
and GPU *and* VPU purposes, but not as a separate processor (which would be
classified as "custom") that is the "problem".

So starting at page 1146, we need to work out how to shoe horn a ton of
stuff into the ISA, as well as fit 16 bit compressed in as well.

L.
Read more Also: Libre RISC-V Open-Source Effort Now Looking At POWER Instead Of RISC-V

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