Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Microsoft Embedded Inside Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • Linux Kernel 5.4 to Have Kernel Lockdown and ExFAT Support

    The lockdown feature aims to further strengthen Linux security by “restricting access to kernel features that may allow arbitrary code execution via code supplied by userland processes”.

    In simple words, even the root account cannot modify the kernel code. This will hep in cases where a root account is compromised, the rest of system won’t be easy to compromise specially on kernel level. In even simpler words, it enhances the Linux security.

    There are two lockdown modes: integrity and confidentiality.

    In integrity lockdown mode, kernel features that allow userland to modify the running kernel are disabled.

  • Linus Torvalds isn't worried about Microsoft taking over Linux

    But that doesn't mean the Microsoft leopard can't change its spots. Sure, he hears, "This is the old Microsoft, and they're just biding their time." But, Torvalds said, "I don't think that's true. I mean, there will be tension. But that's true with any company that comes into Linux; they have their own objectives. And they want to do things their way because they have a reason for it." So, with Linux, "Microsoft tends to be mainly about Azure and doing all the stuff to make Linux work well for them," he explained.

    Torvalds emphasized this is normal: "I mean, that's just being part of the community."

    As Eric Raymond pointed out in his seminal open-source work, The Cathedral and the Bazaar: "Every good work of software starts by scratching a developer's personal itch."

Linus Torvalds Shares His Thoughts on Microsoft’s New-Found Love

  • Linus Torvalds Shares His Thoughts on Microsoft’s New-Found Love for Linux

    But is this reaction justified? Is Microsoft truly out to wrestle control of Linux? To ’embrace, extend and extinguish’ like the well-worn mantra proclaims?

    Who better to ask than Linus Torvalds, founder of the Linux kernel.

    ZDNet‘s Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols (svjn) put the question to Linus at recent Linux developer conference — and the newly-relaxed Finn’s opinion doesn’t deliver what some users might have wished to hear.

    Linus is quoted as saying: “The whole anti-Microsoft thing was sometimes funny as a joke, but not really. Today, they’re actually much friendlier. I talk to Microsoft engineers at various conferences, and I feel like, yes, they have changed, and the engineers are happy.“

    “And they’re like really happy working on Linux. So I completely dismissed all the anti-Microsoft stuff.”

Linus Torvalds dismisses 'anti-Microsoft stuff'...

  • Linus Torvalds dismisses 'anti-Microsoft stuff', claims Microsoft is now 'much friendlier' towards Linux

    The company went further in May this year by releasing a new Windows 10 Insider Preview build featuring the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL2), which includes a real Linux kernel, enabling users to run more Linux software on Windows.

    While Torvalds and several other Linux kernel developers believe that Microsoft may have a desire to control Linux, they also assert that the software giant (or any third-party vendor) is not in a position to control Linux because of the very nature of the operating system, the way it has been developed, and its GPL2 open-source licensing.

Linus Torvalds isn't concerned about Microsoft hijacking Linux

  • Linus Torvalds isn't concerned about Microsoft hijacking Linux

    According to Torvalds, all the various companies showing an interest in Linux and throwing their resources into developing it have their own objectives, with their ultimate goal being to profit in some way from Linux.

    Microsoft is inclined towards Linux because of Azure, Torvalds believes, as over 50 per cent of the company's Azure workloads are now Linux. With the company expecting Azure to be a bigger business than Windows, it now has a strong interest in making it work better, rather than competing directly against it.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Running deepin 20 LiveCD

If you run deepin 20 from usb, you will find it is an Installer similar to Microsoft Windows Installer and not a LiveCD. Meaning, in order to try out deepin you must install it and cannot try it out beforehand like Ubuntu. Fortunately, actually the deepin installer includes LiveCD Session. We just need a little adjustment at the boot time and it works. Enjoy! Read more

Open Source Lightweight Directory Access Protocol Solutions

LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is an application protocol for accessing directory services. It runs on a layer above the TCP/IP stack incorporating simplified encoding methods, and offers a convenient way to connect to, search, and modify Internet directories, specifically X.500-based directory services. It is an open, vendor-neutral, industry standard application protocol. LDAP utilizes a client-server model. This protocol is specifically targeted at management applications and browser applications that provide read/write interactive access to directories. The main benefit of using an LDAP server is that information for an entire organization can be consolidated into a central repository. LDAP supports Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS), so that sensitive data can be protected. LDAP servers are used for a variety of tasks including, but not limited to, user authentication, machine authentication, user/system groups, asset tracking, organization representation, and application configuration stores. Read more

Telegram for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, Mint Ulyana and Latest Fedora

This is for you who want to have Telegram application on Ubuntu Focal Fossa and latest GNU/Linux Mint 20 Ulyana and Fedora 32. You can also practice this on other great OSes released just recently most notably MX Patito Feo and deepin 20. This means you can enjoy the fastest instant messenger on latest free software operating systems released this year for your computer and laptop. Enjoy Telegram! Read more

Introducing Precursor

Precursor is a mobile, open source electronics platform. Similar to how a Raspberry Pi or an Arduino can be transformed into an IoT gadget with the addition of a couple breakout boards, some solder, and a bit of code, Precursor is a framework upon which you can assemble a wide variety of DIY mobile applications. Precursor is unique in the open source electronics space in that it’s designed from the ground-up to be carried around in your pocket. It’s not just a naked circuit board with connectors hanging off at random locations: it comes fully integrated—with a rechargeable battery, a display, and a keyboard—in a sleek, 7.2 mm (quarter-inch) aluminum case. Read more