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SUSE drops OpenStack Cloud

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SUSE

For years, SUSE, the European Linux and open-source company, was one of the OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud program's champions. No longer. SUSE has decided to cease production of new versions and to discontinue sales of SUSE OpenStack Cloud.

This comes only a few months after SUSE OpenStack Cloud 9 was released. This was based on the OpenStack Rocky. release and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 12 SP4. It was also the first release to integrate HPE's Helion OpenStack. SUSE had acquired HPE cloud assets three years earlier.

Why the sudden shift? SUSE stated, "SUSE is focusing on and increasing our strategic investments in the application delivery market and its opportunities in order to align with technology trends in the industry and, most important, with our customers' needs. So SUSE will be working more on its Kubernetes-based application delivery offerings, SUSE Cloud Application Platform and SUSE CaaS Platform." SUSE also hinted there would be "future technology acquisitions."

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Suse’s OpenStack Cloud dissipates

  • Suse’s OpenStack Cloud dissipates

    Suse, the newly independent open-source company behind the eponymous Linux distribution and an increasingly large set of managed enterprise services, today announced a bit of a new strategy as it looks to stay on top of the changing trends in the enterprise developer space. Over the course of the last few years, Suse put a strong emphasis on the OpenStack platform, an open-source project that essentially allows big enterprises to build something in their own data centers akin to the core services of a public cloud like AWS or Azure. With this new strategy, Suse is transitioning away from OpenStack . It’s ceasing both production of new versions of its OpenStack Cloud and sales of its existing OpenStack product.

    “As Suse embarks on the next stage of our growth and evolution as the world’s largest independent open source company, we will grow the business by aligning our strategy to meet the current and future needs of our enterprise customers as they move to increasingly dynamic hybrid and multi-cloud application landscapes and DevOps processes,” the company said in a statement. “We are ideally positioned to execute on this strategy and help our customers embrace the full spectrum of computing environments, from edge to core to cloud.”

SUSE OpenStack Is No More — But Don’t Panic

SUSE Dumps OpenStack

  • SUSE Dumps OpenStack

    Open source vendor SUSE is getting out of the OpenStack business, the company says.

    The decision is part of a shift in company strategy from infrastructure enablement to enabling application delivery, the company said in a blog post announcing the decision Wednesday.

    The blog post quotes IDC analyst Al Gillen, who says "applications and experiences, rather than … infrastructure deployments," are key to differentiation. SUSE's decision "moves the company's value-add higher up the technology stack, to a level where customers want and need tools that empower them to achieve differentiation," Gillen says.

Linux Vendor SUSE Exits OpenStack Cloud Market

Suse grounds its OpenStack Cloud

  • Suse grounds its OpenStack Cloud in favor of Kubernetes and containers

    Open source vendor Suse has pulled the plug on its OpenStack Cloud a few months after its latest release, the company announced on Wednesday.

    Suse is throwing in the towel on OpenStack in favor of its Cloud Application platform, which is based on the open-source Cloud Foundry platform, and a Kubernetes based-container platform.

    As part of that move to Kubernetes, Suse is no longer producing new versions of its OpenStack Cloud while ceasing the sales of its existing OpenStack product.

Open source vendor SUSE gives OpenStack the boot

SUSE Dropping OpenStack Cloud to Focus on Core Platforms

  • SUSE Dropping OpenStack Cloud to Focus on Core Platforms
  • SUSE Dumps OpenStack

    The decision is part of a shift in company strategy from infrastructure enablement to enabling application delivery, the company said in a blog post announcing the decision Wednesday.

    The blog post quotes IDC analyst Al Gillen, who says "applications and experiences, rather than … infrastructure deployments," are key to differentiation. SUSE's decision "moves the company's value-add higher up the technology stack, to a level where customers want and need tools that empower them to achieve differentiation," Gillen says.

    SUSE is focusing itself on cloud-native and container technologies for application delivery, Kubernetes and DevOps, the company says. Specifically, it's putting its resources behind its Cloud Application Platform, based on Cloud Foundry, as well as SUSE CaaS Platform, for Kubernetes container management (a.k.a. "containers as a service").

  • SUSE ditches OpenStack to focus on applications

    Linux company SUSE Group is killing off its OpenStack Cloud product, stopping development in order to focus more on application delivery.

    SUSE OpenStack Cloud is the company’s distribution of the open-source OpenStack platform that provides a framework to create and manage both public cloud and private cloud infrastructure.

    The surprise announcement comes just a few months after the release of SUSE OpenStack Cloud 9, which was based on the most recent OpenStack Rocky release. That version was also the first to integrate with Hewlett-Packard Enterprise Co.’s Helion OpenStack, which was acquired by SUSE along with other cloud assets three years earlier.

SUSE what, adoption's still growing, shrugs OpenStack Foundation

  • SUSE what, adoption's still growing, shrugs OpenStack Foundation

    OpenStack chief operating officer Mark Collier told The Reg that while SUSE's decision to abandon its OpenStack Cloud product is "obviously disappointing", adoption is "strong and growing".

    SUSE's decision that it will "cease production of new versions of SUSE OpenStack Cloud" and "discontinue sales of SUSE OpenStack Cloud" is significant, given that it had a seat on the OpenStack board as a Platinum member – one of only eight companies which commits to provide major funding and full-time resources to the OpenStack Foundation, the others being AT&T, Ericsson, Huawei, Intel, Rackspace, Red Hat and Tencent. SUSE will now "carefully transition our board position and sponsorship level" according to a statement sent to The Reg, though it promises continued involvement at some level.

By Microsoft Tim

  • SUSE what, adoption's still growing, shrugs OpenStack Foundation

    OpenStack chief operating officer Mark Collier told The Reg that while SUSE's decision to abandon its OpenStack Cloud product is "obviously disappointing", adoption is "strong and growing".

    SUSE's decision that it will "cease production of new versions of SUSE OpenStack Cloud" and "discontinue sales of SUSE OpenStack Cloud" is significant, given that it had a seat on the OpenStack board as a Platinum member – one of only eight companies which commits to provide major funding and full-time resources to the OpenStack Foundation, the others being AT&T, Ericsson, Huawei, Intel, Rackspace, Red Hat and Tencent. SUSE will now "carefully transition our board position and sponsorship level" according to a statement sent to The Reg, though it promises continued involvement at some level.

    It is tempting therefore to treat Collier's remarks to The Reg as damage limitation, but in this case he has a point. OpenStack, which is a set of projects that enables users to run private clouds, has a huge customer base and its market is growing by about 20 per cent a year, according to recent figures and projections. There is not much competition if you want to run an open-source private cloud, and there can be good reasons to do so.

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