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What are Linux containers?

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GNU
Linux

Programs used to be made by creating large monolithic scripts, however, a lot has changed in the last two decades. There are now prominent methods in manufacturing applications that use small, self-contained programs in tandem to add extra functionality to hardware.
Linux containers (LXC) are an operating system (OS) level virtualization method that allows for multiple isolated Linux systems to run on the single Linux kernel of a control host. Meaning that these programs are isolated in individual user-spaces and operate at the OS level. These containers are self-contained and lightweight, holding very few components, making them a powerful tool for adding applications to a system without worrying about dependency errors.

Developers can use containers to package an application with the libraries, dependencies and other files it needs to run, without the host needing to install extra assets. In this way, containers can be installed and work on any Linux system that supports container functionality regardless of configuration

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