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Programming Leftovers

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  • Xilinx unveils open source FPGA platform

    The Vitis unified software platform from FPGA vendor Xilinx is the result of five-year project to create software development tools using familiar languages like C++ and Python to develop a wide range of applications for its reprogrammable chip.

  • Listen: How ActiveState is tackling “dependency hell” by providing enterprise-level support for open source programming languages [Podcast]

    “Open source back in the late nineties – and even throughout the 2000s – was really hard to use,” ActiveState CEO Bart Copeland says. “Our job,” he continues, “was to make it much easier for developers to use open source and much easier for enterprises to use open source.”

  • 10 open source projects proving the power of Google Go

    Now 10 years in the wild, Google’s Go programming language has certainly made a name for itself. Lightweight and quick to compile, Go has stirred significant interest due to its generous libraries and abstractions that ease the development of concurrent and distributed (read: cloud) applications.

    But the true measure of success of any programming language is the projects that developers create with it. Go has proven itself as a first choice for fast development of network services, software infrastructure projects, and compact and powerful tools of all kinds.

  • The Eclipse Foundation Launches The Eclipse Cloud Development Tools Working Group for Cloud Native Software

    The Eclipse Foundation today announced the launch of the Eclipse Cloud Development Tools Working Group (ECD WG), a vendor-neutral open source collaboration that will focus on development tools for and in the cloud. The ECD WG will drive the evolution and broad adoption of emerging standards for cloud-based developer tools, including language support, extensions, marketplaces, and developer workspace definition. Founding members of the ECD WG include Broadcom, EclipseSource, Ericsson, IBM, Intel, Red Hat, SAP, Software AG, and Typefox among many others.

  • You cannot cURL under pressure

    With cURL having this many features (with the general mass of them being totally unknown to me, let alone how you use them) got me thinking… What if you could do a game show style challenge for them?

  • Follow-up on ‘ASCII Transliteration without ICU or iconv’

    By an anonymous commenter, I got pointed to that Unicode (in Qt) is slightly more complicated than I had considered when writing the code: I missed to handle planes beyond the Basic Multilingual Plane (BMP) and the ‘surrogates’ between code points 0xD800 and 0xDFFF. In a series of recently pushed Git commits I addressed problem of surrogates and fixed some more issues. Some preparatory work has been done to support more planes in the future, but as of now, only the BMP is supported. For details, please have a look at the five commits posted on 2019-10-12.

More in Tux Machines

Open Hardware: RISC-V and Raspberry Pi’s 8th Birthday

  • SiFive Learn Inventor is a Wireless RISC-V Development Kit Inspired by BBC Micro:bit

    SiFive Learn Inventor is a RISC-V educational board partially inspired by BBC Micro:bit board with the same crocodile clip-friendly edge connector, and an LED matrix.

  • Hex Five Announces General Availability of MultiZone Security for Linux - The First Commercial Enclave for RISC-V processors

    Hardware consolidation requirements in automotive, aerospace & defense, and industrial automation are forcing embedded systems designers to merge safety-critical functionality with untrusted applications and operating systems. The resulting monolithic systems present vastly larger code base, greater attack surface, and increased system vulnerability. In response, Hex Five Security Inc. announces the general availability of MultiZone™ Security for Linux, the industry-first enclave specifically designed to bring security through separation to embedded systems. MultiZone™ Security is available immediately for the Microchip PolarFire® system-on-chip, the world’s first hardened real-time, Linux capable, RISC-V-based microprocessor subsystem. Support for additional RISC-V processors to be announced later in 2020.

  • Celebrate the Raspberry Pi’s 8th birthday at a Raspberry Jam

    On 29 February 2020, the Raspberry Pi Foundation will celebrate the eighth birthday of the Raspberry Pi computer (or its second birthday, depending on how strict you are about counting leap years).

Programming: JavaScript, Go, Perl and Python

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn JavaScript

    JavaScript is possibly one of the easiest language to get up and running with. But to truly master the language requires a firm foundation of its intricacies. JavaScript is an interpreted, prototype-based, scripting computer programming language. It came to popular attention as a simple client-side scripting tool, interacting with the user using forms and controlling the web browser, and remains a front-end language for web applications. JavaScript features dynamic types, it’s weakly typed, supports the structured programming syntax from C, uses prototypes instead of classes for inheritance, and copies many names and naming conventions from Java. It also borrows design principles from Scheme and Self, as well as concepts and syntax idioms such as C-style procedural roots.

  • Lessons learned from programming in Go

    When you are working with complex distributed systems, you will likely come across the need for concurrent processing. At Mode.net, we deal daily with real-time, fast and resilient software. Building a global private network that dynamically routes packets at the millisecond scale wouldn’t be possible without a highly concurrent system. This dynamic routing is based on the state of the network and, while there are many parameters to consider here, our focus is on link metrics. In our context, link metrics can be anything related to the status or current properties of a network link (e.g.: link latency).

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  • Add address of FreeBSD iocage jails to PF table
                         
                           

    I started mucking about with PF, but that’s not my department … and so the jails table remained empty which meant the jail could not access anything beyond the host.

                           

    After a bit of searching I found iocage supports most jail(8) parameters, so I did this: [...]

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  • 2019.49 Almost Starring
           
             

    Patrick Spek has made the first release candidate of Rakudo Star 2019.11 available for download. If you are working with Raku from Rakudo Star distributions, then this is the moment to test the distribution so that you can be sure that nothing was missed! So please, download and test it! Which of course you can also do if you’re not generally a user of Rakudo Star

  • Python 3.8.1rc1

    The Python 3.8 series is the newest major release of the Python programming language, and it contains many new features and optimizations.

  • Python 3.8.1rc1 is now available for testing

    Python 3.8.1rc1 is the release candidate of the first maintenance release of Python 3.8. The Python 3.8 series is the newest feature release of the Python language, and it contains many new features and optimizations. You can find Python 3.8.1rc1 here: https://www.python.org/downloads/release/python-381rc1/ Assuming no critical problems are found prior to 2019-12-16, the scheduled release date for 3.8.1 as well as Ned Deily's birthday, no code changes are planned between this release candidate and the final release. That being said, please keep in mind that this is a pre-release of 3.8.1 and as such its main purpose is testing. See the “What’s New in Python 3.8” document for more information about features included in the 3.8 series. Detailed information about all changes made in 3.8.0 can be found in its change log. Maintenance releases for the 3.8 series will continue at regular bi-monthly intervals, with 3.8.2 planned for February 2020.

  • Python Docstrings

    In this tutorial, we will learn about Python docstrings. More specifically, we will learn how and why docstrings are used with the help of examples. Python docstrings (documentation strings) are the string literals that appear right after the definition of a function, method, class, or module. Let's take an example.

  • Python Comments

    Comments are descriptions that help programmers better understand the intent and functionality of the program. They are completely ignored by the Python interpreter.

  • 3 easy steps to update your apps to Python 3

    The 2.x series of Python is officially over, but converting code to Python 3 is easier than you think. Over the weekend, I spent an evening converting the frontend code of a 3D renderer (and its corresponding PySide version) to Python 3, and it was surprisingly simple in retrospect, although it seemed relatively hopeless during the refactoring process.

New: Collabora Office for Android

We are excited to announce a complete new version of Collabora Office for Android, available now in Google Play, with the following main improvements: - A great looking interface, easy to use with just one hand on your phone - Editing of complex office documents, not just viewing - Now re-uses the same technology as Collabora Online. In common with other Collabora Productivity products, this new Android release enables people to edit their documents without compromising on privacy. There is no longer a reason to hand over your data to get rich mobile editing. The new release marks the end of a period of rewriting important parts of the application. We now share much of the code and user experience from Collabora Online’s collaborative editor as well as Collabora Office 6.2 for displaying the documents. Read more

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