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Plasma 5.17.0

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KDE

Plasma 5.17 is the version where the desktop anticipates your needs. Night Color, the color-grading system that relaxes your eyes when the sun sets, has landed for X11. Your Plasma desktop also recognizes when you are giving a presentation, and stops messages popping up in the middle of your slideshow. If you are using Wayland, Plasma now comes with fractional scaling, which means that you can adjust the size of all your desktop elements, windows, fonts and panels perfectly to your HiDPI monitor.

The best part? All these improvements do not tax your hardware! Plasma 5.17 is as lightweight and thrifty with resources as ever.

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Plasma 5.17 is out!

  • Plasma 5.17 is out!

    Plasma 5.17 is the version where the desktop anticipates your needs. Among many new features and improvements, your desktop now starts up faster; Night Color, the color-grading system that relaxes your eyes when the sun sets, has landed for X11; your Plasma desktop recognizes when you are giving a presentation, and stops messages popping up in the middle of your slideshows; and, if you are using Wayland, Plasma now comes with fractional scaling, which means that you can adjust the size of all your desktop elements, windows, fonts and panels perfectly to your HiDPI monitor.

  • KDE Plasma 5.17 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

    KDE Plasma 5.17 brings numerous new features and enhancements, such as Night Color support on X11, multi-screen and HiDPI improvements, fractional scaling on Wayland, support for managing and configuring Thunderbolt devices in System Settings, much-improved notifications with automatic detection of presentations, as well as Breeze GTK theme support for Google Chrome and Chromium web browsers.

  • KDE Plasma 5.17 Released With Wayland Improvements, Better HiDPI

    Plasma 5.17.0 is out as the newest desktop feature release from the KDE project.

    KDE Plasma 5.17 is another significant release with ongoing improvements for Wayland, ongoing work as well for better HiDPI handling, faster start-up performance, slight RGB hinting for font rendering is enabled by default, better Thunderbolt device integration, settings improvements, and many small feature additions.

    Notable on the Wayland front is that KWin now supports fractional scaling but there are also many fixes and other Wayland improvements too.

KDE Plasma 5.17 Arrives Packed Full of New Features

  • KDE Plasma 5.17 Arrives Packed Full of New Features

    Well, Plasma 5.17 boasts a native “night light” feature (dubbed ‘night color’) to help protect eye from blue light.

    This feature, which was previously available in Wayland but now supported in X11 sessions, is something all major desktop operating systems offer, including Ubuntu, macOS and Windows 10.

By Corbet

Plasma 5.17 and Slackware 14.2 Version Bumps

  • KDE Plasma 5 – Slackware October release

    I had already finished compiling KDE-5_19.10 and was waiting for the Plasma 5.17 public release announcement, when Pat upgraded libdvdread in slackware-current. That could mean trouble because of the dreaded ‘Shared library .so-version bump‘ message.
    But he added the older libdvdread.so.4 library to aaa_elflibs so that the k3b program in Plasma5 does not break, and hopefully it remains in there until after I recompile k3b (which ultimately happens for the Plasma5 November release).

    Unfortunately the earlier update of the ‘icu4c’ package broke some other stuff in Plasma5 as well. Be sure to install my ‘icu4c-compat‘ package, which contains the libraries from several older icu4c packages. Read my older article on ‘shared library .so version bumps‘ if you have not already done so, to understand the causes for this breakage.

    The packages for KDE-5_19.10 are available for download from my ‘ktown‘ repository. As always, these packages are meant to be installed on a full installation of Slackware-current which has had its KDE4 removed first. These packages will not work on Slackware 14.2.

4 New Features in KDE Plasma 5.17

Very late coverage

  • KDE Plasma 5.17 Released

    KDE plasma is one of the most featured-rich and beautiful Linux desktop environments. It is also the most customizable desktop environment that I have ever used. Recently, it received a new update Plasma 5.17 with a number of new features and improvements.

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