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AMD EPYC vs. Intel Xeon Cascadelake With Facebook's RocksDB Database

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Following the benchmarks earlier this month looking at PostgreSQL 12.0 on AMD EPYC Rome versus Intel Xeon Cascade Lake there was interest from Phoronix readers in wondering how well Rome is doing for other modern enterprise database workloads. One of those workloads that was recently added to the Phoronix Test Suite / OpenBenchmarking.org is Facebook's RocksDB, the company's embedded database that is forked from Google LevelDB. With RocksDB being designed to exploit many CPU cores and modern SSD storage, here are some benchmarks looking at how the Xeon Platinum 8280 stacks up against various new AMD EPYC 7002 series processors.

RocksDB is a key-value embedded database solution that Facebook has been working on since 2012 in taking Google's LevelDB to the next level of performance on modern CPU/SSD servers. RocksDB is in turn also used by companies like LinkedIn, Airbnb, Pinterest, Rakuten, Uber, and others.

With RocksDB having its own performance-focused built-in benchmarks, it makes for some interesting performance comparisons on these server CPUs given its growing presence in the enterprise. Those unfamiliar with RocksDB can learn more at RocksDB.org.

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NomadBSD 1.3 is now available!

We are pleased to present the release of NomadBSD 1.3. Read more

KF6: How We Organize The Work

In the previous post, I mentioned the KF6 Workboard. I also promised that I would make a specific post once the workboard would be properly organized. I didn’t write it right away, so this post is now long overdue. :-) If you clicked on the link above, you might be a bit scared by the massive board you’re seeing. Yes, this is a massive endeavor even if a bit less overwhelming than the kdelibs to KDE Frameworks transition (but just a bit really). Anyway, if you’re scared: I’m here to help. Read more