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today's leftovers

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  • Molly de Blanc: Autonomy and consent

    When I was an undergraduate, I took a course on medical ethics. The core takeaways from the class were that autonomy is necessary for consent, and consent is necessary for ethical action.

    There is a reciprocal relationship between autonomy and consent. We are autonomous creatures, we are self-governing. In being self-governing, we have the ability to consent, to give permission to others to interact with us in the ways we agree on. We can only really consent when we are self-governing, otherwise, it’s not proper consent. Consent also allows us to continue to be self-governing. By giving others permission, we are giving up some control, but doing so on our own terms.

    In order to actually consent, we have to grasp the situation we’re in, and as much about it as possible. Decision making needs to come from a place of understanding.

  • Ritesh Raj Sarraf: User Mode Linux 5.2

    User Mode Linux version 5.2 has been uploaded to Debian Unstable and will soon be available on the supported architectures. This upload took more time than usual as I ran into a build time failure caused by newer PCAP library.

    Thanks to active upstream developers, this got sorted out quick. In the longer run, we may have a much better fix for it.

  • PCLinuxOS MATE Review

    Published for Patreons on Oct 8th 2019. Available to the public Oct. 17th, 2019 – Become a Patreon today to get this plus exclusive Linux tips not found anywhere else!

  • Worn Out EMMC Chips Are Crippling Older Teslas

    Much like the rockets and spacecraft of sister company SpaceX, Tesla’s vehicles are powered by Linux running on what’s essentially off-the-shelf computing hardware. Until 2018 the Model S and X were running the open source operating system on a NVIDIA Tegra 3, at which point they switched the Media Control Unit (MCU) over to an Intel Atom solution. In either event, the Linux system is stored on an embedded Multi-Media Controller (eMMC) flash chip instead of a removable storage device as you might expect.

    Now under normal circumstances, this wouldn’t be an issue. There are literally billions of devices running Linux from an eMMC chip. But any competent embedded Linux developer would take the steps necessary to make sure the operating system’s various log files are not being written to a non-replaceable storage device soldered onto the board

    Unfortunately, for reasons that still remain somewhat unclear, the build of Linux running on the MCU is doing exactly that. What’s worse, Tesla’s graphical interface appears to be generating its own additional log messages. Despite the likelihood that nobody will ever actually read them, for every second a Tesla is driving down the road, more lines are being added to the log files.

    Now, it appears that the near continuous writing of data to the eMMC chips on the older Tegra-based MCUs has finally started to take its toll. Owners on Tesla forums are reporting that their MCUs are crashing and leaving the expensive vehicles in “Limp Home Mode”, which allows the car to remain drivable but unable to charge. The prescribed fix for this issue by Tesla is a complete MCU replacement at the cost of several thousand dollars. As this failure will almost certainly happen after the factory warranty has lapsed, the owner will have to foot the bill themselves.

  • Seven more videos from the auditorium at LibreOffice Conference 2019

    Yes, here’s anther bunch of videos from our recent LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain.

  • Self-publishing using LibreOffice Writer 6

    My new book, Self-publishing using LibreOffice Writer 6, is now available in paperback or PDF.

  • Montreal Subway Foot Traffic Data

    STM kindly sent me daily values for each subway stations from 2001 to 2018. Armed with all this data, I decided to play a little with R and came up with some interesting graphs.

    Behold this semi-interactive map of Montreal's subway! By clicking on a subway station, you'll be redirected to a graph of the station's foot traffic.

  • Is your Internet up-to-date?

    Modern Internet Standards provide for more reliability and further growth of the Internet. Are you using them?

  • Call of Duty: Modern Warfare ditches loot boxes for a battle pass

    Popularized by Fortnite, the battle pass system allows for players to buy the pass at the beginning of the season, and unlock a variety of items as they progress. Modern Warfare’s system sounds like it’ll be extremely similar to the Fortnite model (which has since been adopted by other major titles, like Destiny 2 and PUBG). Players will be able to buy a pass at the beginning of a season, with full transparency as to what the items included are, and how and when they’ll be unlocked.

  • Innr Smart White A19 bulb review: This inexpensive smart bulb seamlessly connects with a Philips Hue Bridge

    If you’re shopping for your first smart bulb and you’re not ready to invest in a hub, an Innr bulb isn’t the cheapest way to go. Instead, you’d be better off with a Bluetooth- or Wi-Fi-enabled bulb that can operate with just a smartphone app. The latest Philips Hue White bulb, for example, which can be controlled via Bluetooth as well as Zigbee), or a Wi-Fi-connected bulb like the $8 Wyze Bulb, which offers the bonus of being color-temperature-tunable.

  • The Untold Story of the 2018 Olympics Cyberattack, the Most Deceptive [Computer Attack] in History [iophk: Windows TCO]

    All nine of the Olympic staff's domain controllers, the powerful machines that governed which employee could access which computers in the network, had somehow been paralyzed, crippling the entire system. The staff decided on a temporary workaround: They set all the surviving servers that powered some basic services, such as Wi-Fi and the internet-linked TVs, to bypass the dead gatekeeper machines. By doing so, they managed to bring those bare-minimum systems back online just minutes before the end of the ceremony.

  • [Old] Olympic Destroyer Takes Aim At Winter Olympics

    The purpose is to copy the initial stage to the remote system in %ProgramData%\%COMPUTERNAME%.exe and to execute it via a VBScript.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Prison Architect, Rocket League, Unrailed!, Dwarrows, Streets of Rogue

  • Psych Ward: Warden's Edition the first PC expansion for Prison Architect is out with a big free update

    Now that Paradox Interactive own the rights to Prison Architect, with Double Eleven handling the development they've released the first PC DLC with Psych Ward: Warden's Edition. This is an upgraded version of a DLC pack that consoles had for a while, so it's good to see it actually land for PC players too.

  • Psyonix give some details on the item shop coming to Rocket League

    One of the last pieces of the pie to replace their current loot box system in Rocket League is the Item Shop, which Psyonix have now talked about. The item shop will be joined alongside their new Blueprint system to finally get rid of loot box gambling in an update due next month. It's a nice step, as loot boxes are a terrible system but this also comes with its own set of issues. Firstly, the Item Shop is going to be replacing the Showroom, the place where you can view DLC in-game. With it, you will be able to pick a specific item and purchase it with Credits. You will be able to buy Credits in bundles from 500-6500 with a price from $4.99 to $49.99.

  • Chaotic track building game Unrailed! now has a Beta for Linux

    Developer Indoor Astronaut announced yesterday that their amusing and chaotic track building game Unrailed! now has a Beta available for Linux players to try out.

  • Dwarrows, a 3rd person adventure and town-building game will be released for Linux

    After a successful Kickstarter campaign way back in 2016, Lithic Entertainment have been progressing well with their 3rd person adventure and town-building game Dwarrows. Seems like this was one we entirely missed too, even though during their crowdfunding campaign it was announced that it will have Linux support. It's not yet released though, they're expecting to launch sometime in Q1 2020. However, they're currently running a Beta for backers and in August the first Linux build arrived.

  • Streets of Rogue now has a Level Editor and Steam Workshop in Beta, along with an update released

    Streets of Rogue, the incredibly fun rogue-lite from Matt Dabrowski has a new update out. This includes a playable version of the Level Editor and Steam Workshop support in Beta, with new content also available for everyone.

Translation Workshop in Indonesia this Weekend

The KDE Indonesia Community will once again hold a Kopdar (local term for BoF). This meeting is the second meeting after the successful meeting in 2018. The activity will be held this weekend with talks and activities about translating KDE software into Indonesian. The main event is for KDE fans in particular and Linux in general to collaborate in KDE translation. Read more

Python Programming Leftovers

  • Python Bytes Episode #157: Oh hai Pandas, hold my hand?

    Data validation and settings management using python type annotations.

  • Simulate gravity in your Python game

    The real world is full of movement and life. The thing that makes the real world so busy and dynamic is physics. Physics is the way matter moves through space. Since a video game world has no matter, it also has no physics, so game programmers have to simulate physics. In terms of most video games, there are basically only two aspects of physics that are important: gravity and collision. You implemented some collision detection when you added an enemy to your game, but this article adds more because gravity requires collision detection. Think about why gravity might involve collisions. If you can't think of any reasons, don't worry—it'll become apparent as you work through the sample code. Gravity in the real world is the tendency for objects with mass to be drawn toward one another. The larger the object, the more gravitational influence it exerts. In video game physics, you don't have to create objects with mass great enough to justify a gravitational pull; you can just program a tendency for objects to fall toward the presumed largest object in the video game world: the world itself.

  • How to document Python code with Sphinx

    Python code can include documentation right inside its source code. The default way of doing so relies on docstrings, which are defined in a triple quote format. While the value of documentation is well... documented, it seems all too common to not document code sufficiently. Let's walk through a scenario on the power of great documentation. After one too many whiteboard tech interviews that ask you to implement the Fibonacci sequence, you have had enough. You go home and write a reusable Fibonacci calculator in Python that uses floating-point tricks to get to O(1).

What Linux Distributions Are Lightweight For Laptop And PC?

The answer is different. from the default Ubuntu package there are several default applications that come installed when using GNOME (ubuntu desktop environment now). When I use Xubuntu, I don't find some default applications from GNOME like those installed on Ubuntu. But we can still install and use GNOME applications, except for applications that relate to display settings, some features that exist in GNOME cannot be implemented on the Xubuntu desktop. Xubuntu has a different display management application than GNOME. So, each desktop environment has different display settings You can choose several desktop environments that are lighter than GNOME such as Xfce, Lxde, LXQt, KDE or can also use Window Manager that is lighter than the desktop environment. Read more