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Executive Interview: Jim Zemlin, Linux Foundation director

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Interviews

The Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) and Free Standard Group (FSG) merged on Jan. 21, creating the Linux Foundation, a single entity aiming to take responsibility for Linux standardization, promotion, and protection. LinuxDevices.com wasted no time interviewing Jim Zemlin, the new mega-organization's executive director.

Q1 -- Why did the Free Standards Group and Open Source Development Labs
decide to merge?

A1 -- Both groups have long shared the same ultimate goal -- to accelerate the adoption of Linux -- and have worked together in the past. Discussions about how the two groups could work together or join forces have been taking place for some time. Due to the maturity of the Linux market and the new requirements that brings to the support for the operating system, the board members of both organizations decided it was time to officially bring the groups together.

Q2 -- Traditionally, the FSG has operated as a standards body, while the OSDL has been more of an industry working group and marketing body. How will the Linux Foundation operate?

Full Story.

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