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Standards Leftovers

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OSS
  • Digital pollution

    You couldn’t just roll down the street leaving huge piles of garbage everywhere you go, making life slower for everyone as they climb over your mountains of junk, just to get on with their life. You’d feel bad about it, right?

    That’s how I feel about the digital things we put out into the world: websites, apps, and files.

    I prefer coding everything by hand, because I don’t like the huge piles of garbage that the automated generators create. These programs that generate a website, app, or file for you spit out thousands of lines of unnecessary junk when really only 10 lines are needed. Then people wonder why their site is so slow, and they think it’s their phone or connection’s fault.

  • Open Cybersecurity Alliance: An Open Source Initiative for Enabling Improved Interoperability

    The Open Cybersecurity Alliance (OCA) project, an OASIS Open Project with IBM Security and McAfee as the initial contributors, is comprised of global, like-minded cybersecurity vendors, end users, thought leaders and individuals from around the world who are interested in fostering an open cybersecurity ecosystem and solving the interoperability problem. This would be done via commonly developed code and tooling, using mutually agreed-upon technologies, standards and procedures.

  • Open Cybersecurity Alliance: In Pursuit of Interoperability

    The new alliance was formed under the auspices of OASIS, a consortium driving the development, convergence and adoption of open standards. It was launched as an OASIS Open Project on Oct. 8.

  • what it can learn from nature – open standards – in bio diversity vs monoculture efficiency (why one system to rule them all is a bad idea)

    common (GPL licenced?) formats (rtf, pdf, odt, doc) protocols (http, https, imap) standards yes – but no mono culture of software (one vs many mail providers, one vs many operating systems, one vs many Text Editors, one Mail program/server vs many Mail server).

    Software mono culture means: a more fragile system with central point(s) of failure affecting the whole planet (Spectre Meltdown) = insecurity = instability = bad for the whole ecosystem.

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