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Disney+ streaming uses draconian DRM, avoid

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First of all, as always my opinions are my own, not those of my employer.

Since I have 2 children I was happy to learn that the Netherlands would be one of the first countries to get Disney+ streaming.

So I subscribed for the testing period, problem all devices in my home run Fedora. I started up Firefox and was greeted with an "Error Code 83", next I tried Chrome, same thing.

So I mailed the Disney helpdesk about this, explaining how Linux works fine with Netflix, AmazonPrime video and even the web-app from my local cable provider. They promised to get back to me in 24 hours, the eventually got back to me in about a week. They wrote: "We are familiar with Error 83. This often happens if you want to play Disney + via the web browser or certain devices. Our IT department working hard to solve this. In the meantime, I want to advise you to watch Disney + via the app on a phone or tablet. If this error code still occurs in a few days, you can check the help center ..." this was on September 23th.

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Disney+ Currently Won't Work On Linux Systems

  • Disney+ Currently Won't Work On Linux Systems Due To Tightened DRM

    For those hoping that the Disney+ streaming service would work on Linux in conjunction with a modern web browser, sadly that is not set to be the case. While the likes of Netflix and Hulu can play from Linux desktop web browsers, Disney's tightened Digital Rights Management around their new service doesn't allow for Linux support with current browsers.

    Disney+ is Disney's long talked about video on-demand streaming service that will officially launch next month in the US, Canada, The Netherlands, and other markets. Well known open-source/Linux developer Hans de Goede has been part of the test circle for the platform and sadly it does not bode well for Linux users.

Disney+ doesn't work on Linux

  • Disney+ doesn't work on Linux yet due to tightened Digital Rights Management

    Linux developer, Hans de Goede, has revealed that Disney+ doesn’t work on Linux machines due to tightened Digital Rights Management (DRM) controls that the company has opted to use. According to de Goede, the problem doesn’t only occur in Firefox but the issue arises in Google Chrome too. Apparently, it’s caused by Disney choosing level three security in the Widevine content decryption module (CDM), while Linux, and several Android devices, only support level one.

    It’s unclear whether Linux users will be able to enjoy Disney content via the subscription service in the future. The firm is aware of the issue and that it’s IT department is “working hard to solve this”. The confirmation of the problem was received by Disney on September 23 and as of yesterday afternoon (European time), the issue has still not been resolved.

Disney+ does not work on Linux devices

  • Disney+ does not work on Linux devices

    Linux users who plan to subscribe to Disney's Disney+ video streaming service may have a rude awakening when they are greeted with Error Code 83 when trying to play any TV show or movie offered by Disney+ on Linux devices.

    Fedora Linux package maintainer Hans De Goede from the Netherlands decided to try out Disney+ as the service launched recently in some regions including in the Netherlands. Interested users can sign up for a free trial to test the service.

Happily Never After: Why Disney+ Doesn’t Support Linux (Yet)

  • Happily Never After: Why Disney+ Doesn’t Support Linux (Yet)

    As many of you will no doubt know, most major online video streaming services work on Linux via Google Chrome and Firefox browsers “thanks” to DRM and the “Widevine” plugin.

    This plugin, controversial though it is, is what enables Linux desktops to access content on Netflix, Amazon Prime, and other VoD providers.

    Now, in theory, there’s no technical reason why folks can’t watch Disney+ on Linux using Widevine too (Disney+ uses it on Windows and macOS).

    Hans de Goede mailed Disney to explain his issues, which Disney said they were aware of and that their IT department was “working hard to solve”.

    But a month on from that mail there’s been zero progress.

Disney+ Might Not Work on Your Device

  • Disney+ Might Not Work on Your Device

    Those looking forward to the upcoming Disney+ may want to double-check their preferred devices can actually run the streaming service in the first place. According to Linux developer Hansdegoede, Linux PCs, Chromebooks, and some Android devices are incapable of meeting Disney’s stringent DRM requirements necessary for accessing Disney+ via web browsers.

    Disney+ uses the “Widevine” DRM, which restricts access to content based on a security level between 1 (low) and 3 (high). Most streaming services only require devices meet level 1 security in order to watch (non-4K) content, but Disney+ is only accessible to devices that meet level 3. Linux, Chromebooks, and some older Android devices are only compatible with level 1, meaning all those devices are locked out of the service. Disney is aware of this issue and told Hansdegeode that the issue was being worked on back in September, but the error persists.

Sadly Disney+ Won’t Work on Chromebooks, Linux, & Some Android

  • Sadly Disney+ Won’t Work on Chromebooks, Linux, & Some Android Devices Because of DRM

    If you plan to get Disney+ with the hopes of using it on a Chromebook, Linux computer, or some Android streaming players, you may be out of luck. Sadly, early testing in the Netherlands has shown Disney+ does not work on these devices.

    So why are devices like Chromebooks blocked? It seems that Disney has set its DRM (Digital Rights Management) to a very high level to help prevent piracy. Disney uses a DRM system created by Google called Widevine. The Widevine system has three different levels of security, and Disney has set their level of security all the way up to 3 according to Hasdegoede who first reported this and Cord Cutters News has later confirmed. Sadly many devices including Chromebooks and Linux do not support level 3 Widevine as their support stops at level 1.

    Google’s Widevine DRM is a widely used DVR standard for services like Google Play, Netflix, and Amazon Prime Video. This DRM standard is also why you can’t stream Netflix higher than 480p on mobile devices and some Android streaming players.

Disney+ Does Not Work On Linux Devices

  • Disney+ Does Not Work On Linux Devices

    De Goede noticed that Disney+ would not work in any of the web browsers that he tried on systems running Fedora Linux. He tried Firefox and Chrome, and both times Disney+ threw the error "error code 83." Disney+ Support was not able to assist de Goede. It replied with a generic message stating that the error was known and that it happened often when customers tried to play Disney+ in web browsers or using certain devices. Support recommended to use the official applications on phones or tablets to watch the shows or movies. Other streaming services, e.g. Netflix, work fine on Linux.

Stephen Michael Kellat: Assessing Cord Cutting

Disney+ incompatible with certain devices...

  • Disney+ incompatible with certain devices, Linux developer reveals why

    The content streaming market just welcomed another competitor that hopes to attract new subscribers. With a massive library of movies and upcoming exclusive series, Disney+ appears to be the platform to beat. However, a recent report from developers confirms that the service might not be compatible with all devices. It appears that the strict DRM built into the system is causing problems for owners of these devices. If the issue is not addressed soon, it can push users to switch to alternatives that can support their platforms.

    Among the items reportedly affected are Chromebooks, Linux PCs and some Android devices that fail to meet the DRM system's requirements. Lifehacker points out that credit for this discovery goes to Hansdegoede, a Linux developer who confirmed what causes the Disney+ compatibility matter. Based on the findings, Disney's streaming service relies on Widvine DRM. Ideally, this security measure is in place to block users from accessing content over the web on devices deemed as potential risks for unauthorised usage.

Disney’s Streaming Service is Having Troubles with Linux

  • Disney’s Streaming Service is Having Troubles with Linux

    You might be already using Amazon Prime Video (comes free with Amazon Prime membership) or Netflix on your Linux system. Google Chrome supports these streaming services out of the box. You can also watch Netflix on Firefox in Linux but you have to explicitly enable DRM content.

    However we just learned that Disney’s upcoming streaming service, Disney+ does not work in the same way.

    A user, Hans de Goede, on LiveJournal revealed this from his experience with Disney+ in the testing period. In fact, the upcoming streaming service Disney+ does not support Linux at all, at least for now.

Disney+ won't work on Linux at launch as the DRM is set too high

  • Disney+ won't work on Linux at launch as the DRM is set too high

    IT'S EXPECTED TO lead the vanguard of streaming services launching in the next six months, but Disney+ won't be available to Linux users at launch.

    The news, which also applies to Chromebooks and some lower-end Android devices, has come about because of the level of DRM applied to streams.

    The service will use a system known as Widevine to try and keep stream rippers at bay. It has three levels of security, and most services, like Google Play, Netflix and Amazon use the lowest - Level 3.

Disney+ May Not Work on Chromebooks and Some Android Devices

  • Disney+ May Not Work on Chromebooks and Some Android Devices Due to Access Control Technologies

    According to early testing in the Netherlands, Disney+ may not work on a number of popular consumer devices. Much like other streaming services, Disney is using DRM, or Digital Rights Management, to help prevent piracy, but is using a much more strict version.

    Disney is using a DRM service provided by Google called Widevine, which offers three different levels of security. Currently, Disney+ is using level 1, which is the strictest level and is not supported by Chromebooks and many older Android devices.

    Streaming services like Netflix use level 3 DRM, which doesn’t support HD streaming on mobile devices and some Android devices. Disney+ using type 1 allows it to stream in HD, but limits the number of supported devices.

Disney streaming service, Disney+, doesn't work on Linux... yet

  • Disney streaming service, Disney+, doesn't work on Linux... yet

    Want to watch a Disney movie via Disney+ on your Linux-based home media server? You might not be able to. A user in the Netherlands and forum user on tweakers.net have found that Disney+ isn’t compatible with Linux, at least in its current state.

    The issue lies with the DRM method used by Disney. DRM is used by every major streaming service in some way, shape, or form. However, Disney’s particular implementation doesn’t play nicely with Linux. Hans de Goede, a Disney+ subscriber, explained that the streaming service simply refused to run in either Firefox or Chrome on his Fedora machine. Every time, the browser would spit out an error (“Error Code 83”).

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