Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

An Interview With Zlatan Todoric, Open-Source Developer & Former Purism CTO

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

With the early Librem 5 smartphones now shipping from their "Aspen" batch and recent Reddit discussions about the Librem 5 roping him in, former Purism CTO Zlatan Todoric has agreed to a brief interview on Phoronix.

Zlatan Todoric is no longer employed by Purism but was one of the original staff members going back to 2015 when they were primarily focused on shipping Linux laptops and then developed their privacy-minded smartphone ambitions. He's been out since September 2018 but that also means his NDA has expired. Through this he's also a Debian developer and contributor to other free software projects. So let's welcome Zlatan and the opportunity to learn more about some of the history of Purism's Linux hardware efforts.

Read more

Now in Slashdot

  • An Interview With Former Purism CTO Zlatan Todoric Hints At Chaos At Purism

    Phoronix published an interview with former Purism CTO Zlatan Todoric who left Purism in September 2018. The story hints quite strongly at chaotic situations over at Purism. He started at the company in 2015, when it was a small outfit, and steered it into the bigger company that it is now. To him the smartphone development for the Librem 5 was a mistake and way too early. He has high hopes for the Pinephone, who according to him are doing things right. The first "Aspen" batch of the Purism Librem 5 are supposed to be shipping, though seemingly only people related to Purism are showing off their devices.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GIMP Tutorial: How to Outline Text

Learn how to add outline to text in GIMP in three easy and simple steps with this screenshot tutorial. Read more

Android Leftovers

Customize your Linux desktop with the Trinity Desktop Environment

When KDE 4 was released in 2008, KDE 3 went into support mode until support was dropped entirely. That's the usual lifecycle of software, desktops included, but the KDE 3 fanbase wasn't universally pleased with KDE 4, and some of them decided a fork was in order. Some of them formed a new project with the mission of preserving the look and feel of KDE 3, starting from KDE 3.5.10 (the last official release in the 3.x series), and then forking Qt 3 into TQt to keep the underlying technology updated. Today, the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE) delivers a traditional desktop environment that looks and feels essentially the same as KDE 3 did 10-plus years ago. Read more