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Programming: Automation, Python, Rust and More

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Development
  • Introducing your friends to automation (and overcoming their fear)

    Another fear that I face often from friends is that they don’t know any programming languages, and believing that if they don’t know how to code, then they can’t do automation. While I think we can all agree that knowing Bash, Python, Perl, or even PowerShell is useful when defining these processes to reduce human interaction, it is not always needed.

    Today we have the tools at our disposal to implement such processes without the absolute need to know a traditional programming language. For example, tools like Red Hat Ansible Tower and Azure DevOps let us take advantage of already created playbooks or plugins. Rarely do we see where one tool fits all, but just getting started with one tool is sometimes enough to get a feel for automation. In turn, that beginning is enough to gain confidence and see the true benefits of automating, which encourages us just enough to try learning something new.

  • Python 2.7.17 released

    Python 2.7.17 is now available for download. Note Python 2.7.17 is the penultimate release in the Python 2.7 series.

  • Python 2.7.17

    Python 2.7.17 is a bug fix release in the Python 2.7.x series. It is expected to be the penultimate release for Python 2.7.

  • Python 3.7.4 : Usinge pytesseract for text recognition.
  • Started a newsletter

    I started a newsletter, focusing on different stories I read about privacy, security, programming in general. Following the advice from Martijn Grooten, I am storing all the interesting links I read (for many months). I used to share these only over Twitter, but, as I retweet many things, it was not easy to share a selected few.

  • Indent datastructure for trees

    It is a preorder traversal of the conceptual tree, aggregating (depth, name) tuples into a list to form what I am calling the indent tree datastructure as it captures all the information of the tree but in a different datastructure than normal, and can be extended to allow data at each node and might be a useful alternative for DB storage of trees.

  • Daniel Silverstone: A quarter in review - Nearly there, 2020 in sight

    I have worked very hard on my Rustup work, and I have also started to review documentation and help updates for the Rust compiler itself. I've become involved in the Sequoia project, at least peripherally, and have attended a developer retreat with them which was both relaxing and productive.

    I feel like the effort I'm putting into Rust is being recognised in ways I did not expect nor hope for, but that's very positive and has meant I've engaged even more with the community and feel like I'm making a valuable contribution.

    I still hang around on the #wg-rustup Discord channel and other channels on that server, helping where I can, and I've been trying to teach my colleagues about Rust so that they might also contribute to the community.

    So initially an 'A', I dropped to an 'A-' last time, but I feel like I've put enough effort in to give myself 'A+' this time.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppGSL 0.3.7: Fixes and updates

    A new release 0.3.7 of RcppGSL is now on CRAN. The RcppGSL package provides an interface from R to the GNU GSL using the Rcpp package.

    Stephen Wade noticed that we were not actually freeing memory from the GSL vectors and matrices as we set out to do. And he is quite right: a dormant bug, present since the 0.3.0 release, has now been squashed. I had one boolean wrong, and this has now been corrected. I also took the opportunity to switch the vignette to prebuilt mode: Now a pre-made pdf is just included in a Sweave document, which makes the build more robust to tooling changes around the vignette processing. Lastly, the package was converted to the excellent tinytest unit test framework.

  • Styled output in Poke programs

    I just committed support for styling in printf. Basically, it uses the libtextstyle approach of having styling classes that the user can customize in a .css file.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Orange Pi 4 has an RK3399 and an optional NPU

Shenzhen Xunlong has posted preliminary specs for a Rockchip RK3399 based “Orange Pi 4” SBC that is smaller and more affordable than the Orange Pi RK3399 and faster and more feature rich than the Orange Pi 3. A 4B variant adds a Lightspeeur 2801S AI chip. New Orange Pi boards usually just show up unannounced on AliExpress, but for the fourth iteration of its flagship Orange Pi board, Shenzhen Xunlong teased some detail views on Twitter. The Orange Pi 4 and an AI-enhanced Orange Pi 4B will ship in two weeks. Pricing is undisclosed, but the boards will be “cheaper” than the previous Rockchip RK3399-based Orange Pi, the Orange Pi RK3399. That larger SBC debuted at $109 and now sells for $89 with 2GB DDR3 and 16GB eMMC compared to 4GB LPDDR4 and 16GB eMMC for the Orange Pi 4. Read more

RedisInsight Revealed and WordPress 5.2.4 Released

  • Redis Labs eases database management with RedisInsight

    The robust market of tools to help users of the Redis database manage their systems just got a new entrant. Redis Labs disclosed the availability of its RedisInsight tool, a graphical user interface (GUI) for database management and operations. Redis is a popular open source NoSQL database that is also increasingly being used in cloud-native Kubernetes deployments as users move workloads to the cloud. Open source database use is growing quickly according to recent reports as the need for flexible, open systems to meet different needs has become a common requirement. Among the challenges often associated with databases of any type is ease of management, which Redis is trying to address with RedisInsight.

  • WordPress 5.2.4 Update

    Late-breaking news on the 5.2.4 short-cycle security release that landed October 14. When we released the news post, I inadvertently missed giving props to Simon Scannell of RIPS Technologies for finding and disclosing an issue where path traversal can lead to remote code execution. Simon has done a great deal of work on the WordPress project, and failing to mention his contributions is a huge oversight on our end. Thank you to all of the reporters for privately disclosing vulnerabilities, which gave us time to fix them before WordPress sites could be attacked.

Desktop GNU/Linux: Rick and Morty, Georges Basile Stavracas Neto on GNOME and Linux Format on Eoan Ermine

  • We know where Rick (from Rick and Morty) stands on Intel vs AMD debate

    For one, it appears Rick is running a version of Debian with a very old Linux kernel (3.2.0) — one dating back to 2012. He badly needs to install some frickin’ updates. “Also his partitions are real weird. It’s all Microsoft based partitions,” a Redditor says. “A Linux user would never do [this] unless they were insane since NTFS/Exfat drivers on Linux are not great.”

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Every shell has a story

    … a wise someone once muttered while walking on a beach, as they picked up a shell lying on the sand. Indeed, every shell began somewhere, crossed a unique path with different goals and driven by different motivations. Some shells were created to optimize for mobility; some, for lightness; some, for speed; some were created to just fit whoever is using it and do their jobs efficiently. It’s statistically close to impossible to not find a suitable shell, one could argue. So, is this a blog about muttered shell wisdom? In some way, it actually is. It is, indeed, about Shell, and about Mutter. And even though “wisdom” is perhaps a bit of an overstatement, it is expected that whoever reads this blog doesn’t leave it less wise, so the word applies to a certain degree. Evidently, the Shell in question is composed of bits and bytes; its protection is more about the complexities of a kernel and command lines than sea predators, and the Mutter is actually more about compositing the desktop than barely audible uttering.

  • Adieu, 32

    The tenth month of the year arrives and so does a new Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) update. Is it a portent that this is the 31st release of Ubuntu and with the 32nd release next year, 32-bit x86 Ubuntu builds will end?