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Programming Leftovers

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  • Codeplay Launches Open-Source 'SYCL Academy' To Learn This Increasingly Popular Standard

    While SYCL has been around for five years as a Khronos standard providing a single-source C++ programming model for exploiting OpenCL, it has yet to reach its prime but demand for it is picking up with Intel working to upstream their SYCL back-end in LLVM, SYCL becoming part of their programming model with oneAPI and Xe Graphics, and other vendors also jumping on the SYCL bandwagon. Codeplay has now provided an open-source SYCL learning code for those interested in this higher-level alternative to straight OpenCL programming.

  • Open-Source Build and Test Tool Bazel Reaches 1.0

    Derived from Google's internal build tool Blaze, Bazel is a build and test tool that offers a human-readable definition language and is particularly aimed at large, multi-language, multi-repositories projects. Originally open-sourced in 2015, Bazel has now reached 1.0.

    One of the major implications of reaching version 1.0 for Bazel is the promise of greater stability and backward-compatibility guarantees. This has been a historical pain point for Bazel users, who often found themselves in the situation of having to rewrite part of their build rules due to frequent breaking changes in Bazel or its ecosystem. Accordingly, the Bazel team has committed to following semantic versioning for future Bazel releases, meaning only major versions will be allowed to include breaking changes. Furthermore, the team committed to maintaining a minimum stability window of three months between major versions.

  • DevOps Deeper Dive: DevOps Accelerates Open Source Innovation Pace

    That rate of innovation has increased dramatically in the last few years. However, much of that innovation would not have been possible if large swaths of the open source community hadn’t been able to employ best DevOps practices to collaborate, said CloudBees CEO Sacha Labourey.

    [...]

    None of this shift has been lost on IT vendors. As the demand for proprietary code slackened, many found it profitable to offer support services for open source software. The more there is to consume, the more the support services contracts grew. Now every vendor from IBM to small IT services providers such as Fairwinds has launched open source projects that help drive demand for IT services expertise.

    “There’s pain around integrating a lot of disparate open source projects,” said Robert Brennan, director of open source software for Fairwinds. “Organizations may be getting software for free, but there’s usually not a lot of help around.”

    Now almost every IT vendor in the world is making software engineers available to work on open source projects. All that talent focused on open source projects has led to the development of new platforms such as Jenkins, GitHub, Kubernetes and, more recently, a raft of smaller projects. With the rise of containers and cloud-native applications, open source software projects are entering another era that will see many of those same software engineers leveraging DevOps practices more broadly to drive even more innovative projects at increasingly faster rates.

  • Find your next developer from open source communities

    Meanwhile, demand for data scientists is rising as companies seek AI-based solutions to stay competitive. Demand is reflected in salary offers. Companies competing to hire and retain data experts are offering on average more than US$100,000, making it one of the most highly paid professions in the States.

    For companies lacking the budget to hire or train in-house staff to fill the role, they may find themselves struggling with maintaining technological infrastructure or moving forward with plans for digitization.

    Therefore, open source learning and further development of communities could be the solution to this gap.

    An IBM grant to support open source communities such as Girls Who Code, a non-profit organization offering coding lessons for women in the US, is a step forward to filling in a shortage of software developers.

More in Tux Machines

Python Programming Leftovers

  • Python Modules and Packages: An Introduction

    In this course, you’ll learn about Python modules and Python packages, two mechanisms that facilitate modular programming. Modular programming is the process of breaking a large, unwieldy programming task into separate, smaller, more manageable subtasks or modules. Individual modules can then be put together like building blocks to create a larger application. Learn how to write and import modules so you can optimize the structure of your own programs and make them easier to maintain and grow.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #405 (Jan. 28, 2020)
  • Why Should You Use typing In Python?

    I am using typing at my work project and now trying to use it for my personal or freelance projects only if it is not a one-time script. No sense to invest time in the 15-minute thing. And why you should use it too. Lots of people like Python because it provides a fast way to build software. But on the other hand, after some time of the team development, it can be hard to understand the code for the team members. Especially, for the new ones. I do personally believe that it increases the readability of the code. Seems to me that it is even more about self-documenting the code, not about the type checking. However, yes, it helps to find some obvious bugs. My favorite example is a variable called data. Is it a list? Or maybe a dict? Or maybe something custom? Looks like that you need to invest some time in figuring this out. And probably repeat it one more time in a month or two.

  • Text Classification with BERT Tokenizer and TF 2.0 in Python

    This is the 23rd article in my series of articles on Python for NLP. In the previous article of this series, I explained how to perform neural machine translation using seq2seq architecture with Python's Keras library for deep learning. In this article we will study BERT, which stands for Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers and its application to text classification. BERT is a text representation technique like Word Embeddings. If you have no idea of how word embeddings work, take a look at my article on word embeddings. Like word embeddings, BERT is also a text representation technique which is a fusion of variety of state-of-the-art deep learning algorithms, such as bidirectional encoder LSTM and Transformers. BERT was developed by researchers at Google in 2018 and has been proven to be state-of-the-art for a variety of natural language processing tasks such text classification, text summarization, text generation, etc. Just recently, Google announced that BERT is being used as a core part of their search algorithm to better understand queries. In this article we will not go into the mathematical details of how BERT is implemented, as there are plenty of resources already available online. Rather we will see how to perform text classification using the BERT Tokenizer. In this article you will see how the BERT Tokenizer can be used to create text classification model. In the next article I will explain how the BERT Tokenizer, along with BERT embedding layer, can be used to create even more efficient NLP models. Note: All the scripts in this article have been tested using Google Colab environment, with Python runtime set to GPU.

  • PyCharm 2020.1 EAP starts now

    There are two types of people in the world: those who can wait to open a package they’ve received, and people like me, who need to see what’s inside this very second. PyCharm isn’t delivered in the mail though, and that’s why we have something even better for impatient people. The early access program (EAP) shows you what’s in the package a couple months before you get it. Take a sneak peek, and get PyCharm’s first EAP now!

  • Webinar Recording: “Advanced Debugging in PyCharm”

    Last week we held a special webinar for “Advanced Debugging in PyCharm”. Special how? In person, in the St. Petersburg office, with the two PyCharm team members in charge of the debugger, and a huge webinar audience. The recording is now available.

Perl/Raku Programming Leftovers

  • LANraragi v.0.6.8 - Cool Cat

    LANraragi is a web application for archival and reading of manga/doujinshi. It's lightweight and Docker-ready for NAS/servers. There is even a standing offer from the author to send out a free sticker pack for the first person to run the linux/s390x docker image on a real IBM System 390.

  • Making YAML.pm, YAML::Syck and YAML::XS safer by default

    Several YAML modules allow loading and dumping objects. When loading untrusted data, this can be a security vulnerability, if this feature is enabled.

  • 2020.04 Almost Springtime

    Damian Conway is back from sabbatical: in the second week of March, they will be giving some very interesting courses in Switzerland: Presentation Skills courses, redesigned language-neutral versions of the “API Design”, “Better Coding Practices” courses and a free half-day seminar on Raku on 12 March!

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: LINUX Unplugged, Linux Headlines, Python Bytes, Faces of Open Source and Solus 4.1 MATE Run Through

  • Success Through Vulnerability | LINUX Unplugged 338

    How did we get from shareware to free software? We jump in the Linux powered time machine and revisit software past. Plus a new Plasma focused laptop, and two powerful command-line picks.

  • 2020-01-28 | Linux Headlines

    A partnership to keep open-source secure, Flathub gets social, Kali Linux has a new release and Ubuntu’s first in a series of switch guides.

  • 2020-01-27 | Linux Headlines

    Linux 5.5 arrives with support for the Raspberry Pi 4 among many other improvements, Solus and SQLite both see minor version bumps that pack a punch, and The Qt Company has a major update that is not sitting well with its community.

  • Python Bytes: #166 Misunderstanding software clocks and time

    We all know about bits. Quantum computers use a more sophisticated data representation known as a qubit or quantum bit. Each qubit can exist in state 1 or 0, but also in superpositions of 1 and 0, meaning that the qubit simultaneously occupies both states. Such states can be specified by a two-dimensional vector that contains a pair of complex numbers, making for an infinite number of states. Each of the complex numbers is a probability amplitude, basically the odds that the qubit is a 0 or a 1, respectively.

  • Brunch with Brent: Peter Adams Part 1 | Jupiter Extras 50

    Brent sits down with Peter Adams, professional photographer and former founder and CTO of several internet-technology startups in New York and Silicon Valley. We explore his photography project "Faces of Open Source", his history in the dot-com bubble era, how he came to love open source, and more.

  • Solus 4.1 MATE Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Solus 4.1 MATE.

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