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Games: LinuxGSM, Boxtron, Total War: WARHAMMER II

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  • Need an easy way to manage a Linux game server? LinuxGSM is great and recently passed 100 supported titles

    A project that perhaps isn't as well known as it should be: LinuxGSM makes managing Linux game servers easy and they recently hit a fun milestone.

    It supports running servers for games like 7 Days to Die, Barotrauma, various Counter-Strike versions, Don't Starve Together, Minecraft and a ton more. Starting way back sometime in 2012, the lead developer Daniel Gibbs emailed in to notify us that they recently hit a huge milestone for the project as it now supports over 100 different games.

    There's a number of other ways to run game servers but the point of LinuxGSM is that each game is tweaked and tested by them, with an easy to run installer and script to manage all parts of it. Running updates, getting notifications sent to various places like Discord, Telegram, Email and more when it's having issues is simple to setup.

  • Boxtron, the Steam Play compatibility tool for DOSBox brings more improvements in another update

    The Speedy Staging 0.5.3 of Boxtron is out, further improving this Steam Play compatibility tool for DOSBox gaming on Linux.

    As a reminder of the what and why: Just like how Proton enables you to play Windows games in the Linux Steam client, Boxtron is a tool that can be manually added to the Linux Steam client to run a native version of DOSBox. It's supposed to give you the best experience possible with DOS games on Steam. Rather than running them through Proton you get lower input lag, working Steam integration, better fullscreen support and so on.

  • You can now grab the Gotrek and Felix DLC for Total War: WARHAMMER II free

    Just a quick tip for Total War: WARHAMMER II fans this Monday morning, as you can now grab the previously White Dwarf Magazine exclusive DLC Gotrek and Felix for free.

    While they're only for Total War: WARHAMMER II, if you own both Total War: WARHAMMER titles they are also available in the expansive Mortal Empires campaign.

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