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Ubuntu release could stir the Linux pot with delighted users

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.10. Kubernetes at the edge. Integrated AI and machine learning. Those were a few of the top notes bleated out by Canonical, sounding its trumpet on October 17 with its announcement of the Ubuntu 19.10 release.

What's the big deal? The new release accelerates developer productivity when working on AI/machine learning projects. They said the new release delivered "edge capabilities for MicroK8s." Thirdly, the release delivered "the fastest GNOME desktop performance."

Elaborating on those top notes, the announcement looked at the Kubernetes environment: "Strict confinement ensures complete isolation and a tightly secured production-grade Kubernetes environment, all in a small footprint ideal for edge gateways. MicroK8s add-ons—including Istio, Knative, CoreDNS, Prometheus, and Jaeger—can now be deployed securely at the edge with a single command."

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Ubuntu 19.10: A look into Ubuntu's enterprise future

  • Ubuntu 19.10: A look into Ubuntu's enterprise future

    As Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth said, "In the 15 years since the first Ubuntu release, we have seen Ubuntu evolve from the desktop to become the platform of choice across public cloud, open infrastructure, IoT, and AI." The Linux desktop still matters, especially for developers and system administrators, but Canonical's real cash comes from the cloud.

    I say "plans" because Ubuntu 19.10, Eoan Ermine, isn't a long-term support (LTS) version. No one -- I hope! -- will build a business around an operating system with a nine-month support lifetime. The next LTS edition, Ubuntu 20.04, "Focal Fossa, won't be out until April 2020. But we can see what it's likely to have by looking at Eoan Ermine.

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DXVK 1.4.5 Released

  • DXVK 1.4.5 released bringing further performance improvements for D3D11 and D3D10 to Vulkan

    DXVK continues maturing with another exciting sounding release now available with DXVK 1.4.5, bringing in some performance improvements and plenty of bug fixes. On the performance side DXVK 1.4.5 now enables asynchronous presentation on all GPUs, which was previously disabled for NVIDIA due to GPU hangs. You should ensure your driver is fully up to date, and try the NVIDIA Vulkan Beta Driver as well. On top of that, this release has a reduction in the amount of thread synchronization around occlusion queries which should improve multithreading efficiency.

  • DXVK 1.4.5 Brings Async Presentation For All GPUs, Better Multi-Threading Efficiency

    It's been three weeks already since the last DXVK update but that was succeeded this evening by DXVK 1.4.5 as another notable update to this project mapping Direct3D 10/11 onto Vulkan for speeding up the Wine/Proton-based Windows gaming experience on Linux. DXVK 1.4.5 unconditionally enables asynchronous presentation now for all GPUs while dropping the "asyncPresent" tunable previously exposed for toggling this behavior. For those particularly on NVIDIA graphics if encountering any GPU hangs, make sure you are running the latest NVIDIA driver.

today's howtos and leftovers

GNU and OSS Leftovers

  • Nick Richards: Linux Application Summit 2019

    It was a great conference with a diverse crew of people who all care about making apps on Linux better. I particularly enjoyed Frank’s keynote on Linux apps from the perspective of Nextcloud, an Actual ISV. Also worth your time is Rob’s talk on how Flathub would like to help more developers earn money from their work; Adrien on GTK and scalable UIs for phones; Robin on tone of voice and copywriting; Emel on Product Management in the context of GNOME Recipes and Paul Brown on direct language and better communication. There were also great lightning talks including a starring turn by one of my former colleagues Martin Abente Lahaye who showed off the work he’s been doing to make the Sugar educational applications more widely available with Flatpak. After a bit of review and some polish in the cafe they’re now starting to appear on Flathub. All of these videos are available to watch in the YouTube livestream playback, and I’m sure individually soon when appropriately processed. I gave a talk entitled Product Management In Open Source. Astute readers will recognise the title from the similar talk I gave last year at GUADEC, however the content is actually fairly different. Emel’s talk that I mentioned above covered quite a lot of the basic material so I concentrated more on how individual app developers could use Product Management techniques to make their own practice a bit more deliberate and help them guide and prioritize their work.

  • Collabora sponsoring LibreOffice Developer Bootcamp in Ankara

    On November 13 more than 120 students in Ankara Hacettepe University’s Beytepe Campus joined the first session of the LibreOffice Developer Bootcamp, a course for students with interest in C++. There is a session every week, until the end of the semester.

  • Why AI Should Be Our Ally, Not Our Enemy

    Community-driven open source projects are at the forefront of innovation of virtually every leading technology trend. The fields of AI, ML, deep learning, predictive analysis, and neural networks are no exception. It’s also worth noting that HPC is a vital element for successfully delivering AI and ML. Both rely on high levels of compute capacity for fast analysis of huge datasets – and Linux is at the heart of all the top-performing HPC solutions. Just this week, the latest TOP500 list of supercomputers was released. It was no surprise to see that, yet again, every one of the world’s fastest computers run on Linux.

  • Come together for free software

    Here at the Free Software Foundation (FSF), we strongly believe that one person can make a difference. Our main task, as the principal organization in the fight for user freedom, is one of connection; to bring people together around an unwavering set of principles. We will achieve global software freedom by staying the course, by focusing on education, and by making tools and solutions available, all by working together with this passionate and diverse community.

  • GNU Health patchset 3.6.1 released !

    GNU Health 3.6.1 patchset has been released !

  • Google Shakes Up Its 'TGIF'—and Ends Its Culture of Openness

    Pichai cited decreased attendance rates, the difficulty of running a real-time gathering across time zones, and an uptick in meetings among big product groups like Cloud or YouTube. His most resonant reason, however, was that Google employees could no longer be trusted to keep matters confidential. He cited “a coordinated effort to share our conversations outside of the company after every TGIF ... it has affected our ability to use TGIF as a forum for candid conversations on important topics.” He also noted that while many want to hear about product launches and business strategies, some attend to “hear answers on other topics.” It seems obvious he was referring to recent moments when aggrieved employees registered objections to Google’s policies and missteps—on developing a search engine for China, bestowing millions of dollars to executives charged with sexual misconduct, or hiring a former Homeland Security apparatchik. Pichai says Google may address such issues in specific town-hall meetings when warranted.