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  • AT&T sets a date to put DANOS into the Linux Foundation, names IP Infusion as the reseller

    AT&T has long promised to release its DANOS network operating system into the Linux Foundation. On Tuesday, the telco said it would do just that on Nov. 15 and it also named IP Infusion as the exclusive integrator and reseller of DANOS.

    For over a year now, AT&T has said it would put its disaggregated network operating system (dNOS), which AT&T calls Vyatta, into the Linux Foundation Networking Disaggregated Network Operating System (DANOS) project. In March of last year, the Linux Foundation announced the DANOS project to enable community collaboration across network hardware, forwarding and operating system layers.

    “We’ve been awaiting this moment for some time now and there will be many equipment providers and integrators (and perhaps service providers) who will want to dig into the code," said Roy Chua, founder and principal at AvidThink, in an email to FierceTelecom. "The announcement of IP Infusion as an exclusive partner is an interesting twist. It means that some elements of VyattaOS (the 'production-grade' elements) will not be released into Linux Foundation.

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  • The Good And The Bad Of The ACCESS Act To Force Open APIs On Big Social Media

           

             

    As people here will probably know, I am a huge proponent of a "protocols, not platforms" approach to handling questions around big tech and competition (as well as privacy, content moderation and more). I even wrote a pretty long paper about it for the Knight 1st Amendment Institute at Columbia University entitled Protocols, Not Platforms: A Technological Approach to Free Speech. So, I was definitely curious to see what Senators Warner, Hawley and Blumenthal had cooked up with their new ACCESS Act [Augmenting Compatibility and Competition by Enabling Service Switching Act] since it's being pitched as pressuring big social media companies to open up their platforms to competitors.

  • Put on your tech specs: Amazon Web Services has joined the Java Community Process

    Amazon has made another effort to be a good Java citizen by joining brewmasters at the Java Community Process (JCP), the group which develops specifications for the Java platform.

    The firm's latest move was mentioned by Amazon's Yishai Galatzer, manager of the AWS Artifacts and Languages group at AWS, on Tuesday. Galatzer's team, of course, builds Amazon Corretto, a distribution of the OpenJDK.

    The OpenJDK is an open source implementation of Java licensed under GPL v2 and presented in collaboration with Oracle, owners of Java, which uses OpenJDK code in its own Oracle JDK. Since April 2019, the Oracle JDK is not free for commercial use, for versions 9 and higher, a change which has increased interest in the OpenJDK.

  • New PLCnext Software from Phoenix Contact Comes with Open Linux Environment

More in Tux Machines

Native Linux & Raspberry Pi support for checkra1n jailbreak hinted by developer

Despite hitting the market first, iPhone comes behind Android in terms of popularity. We admit the price plays a significant role here. But, a Samsung or Huawei flagship user who can afford an iPhone will tell you the level of customisation or convenience is what brought them to Android. Let’s set the convenience part aside because it is not really an issue after we get accustomed to the whole ecosystem of a device. However when it comes to the customisation, we can’t deny Android from bagging the pole position. Read more

today's howtos

Linux Kernel Security in a Nutshell: How to Secure Your Linux System

The Linux kernel is the core component of the Linux operating system, maintaining complete control over everything in the system. It is the interface between applications and data processing at the hardware level, connecting the system hardware to the application software. The kernel manages input/output requests from software, memory, processes, peripherals and security, among other hefty responsibilities. Needless to say, the Linux kernel is pretty important. However, with power comes great responsibility, and the Linux kernel is no exception to this rule. Kernel security is critical: it determines the security of the Linux operating system as a whole, as well as the security of every individual system that runs on Linux. Vulnerabilities in the kernel can have serious implications for Linux users, and it is extremely important that users stay up-to-date on news and advisories pertaining to kernel security. Read more

Mozilla: Webcompat, Firefox 71, Privacy Advice and Rust

  • Karl Dubost: Saving Webcompat images as a microservice

    Thinking out loud on separating our images into a separate service. The initial goal was to push the images to the cloud, but I think we could probably have a first step. We could keep the images on our server, but instead of the current save, we could send them to another service, let say upload.webcompat.com with a HTTP PUT. And this service would save them locally.

  • Multiple-column Layout and column-span in Firefox 71

    Firefox 71 is an exciting release for anyone who cares about CSS Layout. While I am very excited to have subgrid available in Firefox, there is another property that I’ve been keeping an eye on. Firefox 71 implements column-span from Multiple-column Layout. In this post I’ll explain what it is and a little about the progress of the Multiple-column Layout specification. Multiple-column Layout, usually referred to as multicol, is a layout method that does something quite different to layout methods such as flexbox and grid. If you have some content marked up and displaying in Normal Flow, and turn that into a multicol container using the column-width or column-count properties, it will display as a set of columns. Unlike Flexbox or Grid however, the content inside the columns flows just as it did in Normal Flow. The difference is that it now flows into a number of anonymous column boxes, much like content in a newspaper.

  • The Mozilla Blog: Can Your Holiday Gift Spy on You?

    Mozilla today launches the third-annual *Privacy Not Included, a report and shopping guide identifying which connected gadgets and toys are secure and trustworthy — and which aren’t. The goal is two-fold: arm shoppers with the information they need to choose gifts that protect the privacy of their friends and family. And, spur the tech industry to do more to safeguard consumers. Mozilla researchers reviewed 76 popular connected gifts available for purchase in the United States across six categories: Toys & Games; Smart Home; Entertainment; Wearables; Health & Exercise; and Pets. Researchers combed through privacy policies, sifted through product and app specifications, reached out to companies about their encryption and bug bounty programs, and more. As a result, we can answer questions like: How accessible is the privacy policy, if there is one? Does the product require strong passwords? Does it collect biometric data? And, Are there automatic security updates?

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 313

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.