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Events: GNOME Asia, GUADEC 2019, ATO 2019

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GNOME
  • Gaurav Agrawal: GNOME Asia 2019

    I feel very emotional and excited while sharing my first ever GNOME+ FOSS + International conference experience with you all.

  • Umang Jain: GUADEC 2019 - A brief update

    Videos are GUADEC 2019 are available here.

    There were many technical and non-technical hallway dicussions with devs who attended that address our day-to-day work and chasing reviews on outstanding merge requests Tongue During the one hackfest day I attended, the travel committee got together to resolve long standing tickets and discussed future plans to make the travel-request pipeline a bit smoother and faster.

    I would like to thank GNOME Foundation for sponsoring my travel. It's always a pleasure to get together with the community in person.

  • ATO 2019 - an event report

    For a number of years now, each October, thousands of technical folks converge in Raleigh for All Things Open. The "all things" includes a lot of developers talking about opensource platforms, tools, stacks, and applications but it also includes topics on open hardware, open government, open education, and building communities in addition to projects and products.

    For a couple of years, I felt there was too much of a programmer focus for me and I wasn't finding new things in the community tracks. It is local though and so with expectations set, I continue to support a great conference and enjoy the hallway track with a number of people I "see" mostly online even though I was not previously finding a lot of talks for my sysadmin or infosec interests.

    I know several local people that have not attended the past couple of years because of this trend and I bring it up because this year was a bit different. While I attended expecting to once again content either repetitive (of other years and other conferences) or too dev focused, I was pleasantly surprised. There were full tracks both days for Security and Linux/Infrastructure.

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