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OSS: Document Foundation, Linux Foundation, Openwashing, Open Access and Mozilla

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OSS
  • Upcoming Elections for the next Board of Directors of The Document Foundation

    That upcoming term will then (regularly) end on February 17, 2022, so the next elections of the Board of Directors will take place before.

    As per § 6 III, only members of the Board of Trustees of The Document Foundation, as well as current members of any of its bodies, are eligible to be elected into the Board of Directors, and the election is overseen by the Membership Committee (§ 7 II).

    The active electoral right is reserved to those who have been members of the Board of Trustees before this announcement (§ 7 II).

    § 6 III also states that members of the Board of Directors or their deputies may not be members of the Membership Committee and vice versa. This means that current members of the Membership Committee are eligible to be elected, but with the acceptance of their new role they lose their current role in the MC. For clarification, they have to step down from the Membership Committee, with effect no later than to the beginning of the new term of the Board of Directors, the minute before accepting to become a member of the Board of Directors.

    There is one more notable limitation: per § 8 IV of the statutes, a maximum of 1/3 members of the Board of Directors is allowed to work on an employment basis for the same company, organization, entities, affiliates or subdivisions.

    Nomination of candidates fulfilling the above requirements, as well as self nomination is welcome. In total, at least seven Board of Directors members are required, and given there are enough candidates, up to three deputies can be elected (§ 7 II). As deputies are on duty quite often, we encourage many candidates to participate.

  • Embedded Linux Conference Europe 2019

    Next week, Collabora will be sponsoring, exhibiting & speaking at Embedded Linux Confererence Europe in Lyon, France. Now in its 14th year, ELCE, which is co-located with the Open Source Summit Europe, is the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using embedded Linux. If you are planning on attending either conference, please make sure to come say hello and see what our team has been working on!

    [...]

    Open Source meets augmented reality in our second demo, which centers around custom development work on the Magic Leap One augmented reality headset using GStreamer! This is your chance to experience this lightweight, wearable computer that seamlessly blends the digital and physical worlds, allowing digital content to coexist with real world objects around you.

  • Apple Provides Scholarships for FoundationDB Summit

    Apple will be providing sponsorships for the scholarships at FoundationDB Summit, happening on Day Zero of KubeCon + CloudNativeCon San Diego.

    For its second year, FoundationDB Summit has two tracks. The first is curated for attendees new to the community and will focus on architectural overviews as well as real-world business applications. The second track will provide technical deep dives into features, challenges, and tooling community members have been working on.
    The FoundationDB scholarship program provides support to those from traditionally underrepresented and/or marginalized groups in the technology and/or open source communities, who may not otherwise have the opportunity to attend CNCF events for financial reasons. Scholarships are also available on a needs and affordability basis.

  • Netflix builds a Jupyter Lab alternative, a bug bounty to fight election hacking, Raspberry Pi goes microscopic, and more open source news
  • Grafana Labs observability platform set to grow

    Dutt: Not really, I said we work with some CNCF projects like Prometheus, but there's no desire on our part to put our own projects such as Grafana or Loki into the CNCF.

    We are an open source observability company and this is our core competency and our core brand. Part of our strategy for delivering differentiated solutions to our customers involves being more in control of our own destiny, so to speak.

    We very much believe in the power of the community. We do have a pretty active community, though certainly more than 50 percent of the work is done by Grafana Labs. We have a habit of always hiring the top contributors within the community, which is how we scale our engineering team.

    [...]

    You know, if you want to have something be open source, then make it really open source, and if it doesn't work through a business model to make a particular thing open source, then don't make it open source.

    So our view is we have a lot of open source software, which is truly open source, meaning under a real open source license like Apache, and we also have our enterprise offerings that are not open.

  • How to migrate from VSCode to VSCodium (the best code editor ever minus the corporate bullshit) [Ed: No, you don't get to escape the "corporate bullshit" by using another form of "teaser" and openwashing stunt of proprietary software MSVS]

    Blogception: a post on VSCodium as it’s being written in VSCodium.

  • The Dawn Of Ad Tech’s Open Source Era
  • What if "Sesame Street" Were Open Access?

    The news of iconic children’s television show “Sesame Street”’s new arrangement with the HBO MAX streaming service has sent ripples around the Internet. Starting this year, episodes of “Sesame Street” will debut on HBO and on the HBO MAX service, with new episodes being made available to PBS “at some point.” Parents Television Council’s Tim Winter recently told New York Times that “HBO is holding hostage underprivileged families” who can no longer afford to watch new “Sesame Street” episodes.

    The move is particularly galling because the show is partially paid for with public funding. Let's imagine an alternative: what if “Sesame Street” were open access? What if the show’s funding had come with a requirement that it be made available to the public?

  • Don’t Let Science Publisher Elsevier Hold Knowledge for Ransom

    It’s Open Access Week and we’re joining SPARC and dozens of other organizations this week to discuss the importance of open access to scientific research publications. 

    An academic publisher should widely disseminate the knowledge produced by scholars, not hold it for ransom. But ransoming scientific research back to the academic community is essentially the business model of the world’s largest publisher of scientific journals: Elsevier.

  • why async fn in traits are hard

    After reading boat’s excellent post on asynchronous destructors, I thought it might be a good idea to write some about async fn in traits. Support for async fn in traits is probably the single most common feature request that I hear about. It’s also one of the more complex topics. So I thought it’d be nice to do a blog post kind of giving the “lay of the land” on that feature – what makes it complicated? What questions remain open?

    I’m not making any concrete proposals in this post, just laying out the problems. But do not lose hope! In a future post, I’ll lay out a specific roadmap for how I think we can make incremental progress towards supporting async fn in traits in a useful way. And, in the meantime, you can use the async-trait crate (but I get ahead of myself…).

More in Tux Machines

The world's fastest supercomputers hit higher speeds than ever with Linux

Yes, there's a lot of talk now about how quantum computers can do jobs in 200 seconds that would take the world's fastest supercomputers 10,000 years. That's nice. But the simple truth is, for almost all jobs, supercomputers are faster than anything else on the planet. And, in the latest Top 500 supercomputer ratings, the average speed of these Linux-powered racers is now an astonishing 1.14 petaflops. The fastest of the fast machines haven't changed since the June 2019 Top 500 supercomputer list. Leading the way is Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Summit system, which holds top honors with an HPL result of 148.6 petaflops. This is an IBM-built supercomputer using Power9 CPUs and NVIDIA Tesla V100 GPUs. Read more

Programming: Django, Python and Qt

  • Introducing DjangoCon Africa

    Following the huge success of PyCon Africa, the Django community in Africa is ready to bring a new major software event to the continent - the very first DjangoCon Africa! The Django Software Foundation is excited to endorse and support this initiative. Plans are already in motion for a DjangoCon Africa to be held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in November 2020. Actual dates to be announced as soon as key details are in place. DjangoCon Africa will include 3 days of single-track talks, 1 day of workshops and sprints, and another day for touring for international visitors. The event will also include a Django Girls workshop to be held the weekend before DjangoCon Africa. To make the conference as inclusive as possible, the event will offer financial aid to members of under-represented communities in software to ensure they can also attend.

  • Django 3.0 release candidate 1 released

    Django 3.0 release candidate 1 is the final opportunity for you to try out the raft of new features before Django 3.0 is released. The release candidate stage marks the string freeze and the call for translators to submit translations. Provided no major bugs are discovered that can't be solved in the next two weeks, Django 3.0 will be released on or around December 2. Any delays will be communicated on the django-developers mailing list thread.

  • Cyber Discovery - What it is all about

    Cyber Discovery is made of 4 rounds. The first one being CyberStart Assess. It ran from the 3rd September to the 25th October 2019. There are 10 challenges starting easy, getting much harder. The aim for most of the challenges are to use 'Inspect Element' to get into the website and find the flag. I completed all of these challenges and was invited onto the next round: CyberStart Game. CyberStart Game is much more about finding things out yourself. A useful tip if you are stuck is to search for help on Google. CyberStart Game has 3 'Bases': Headquarters where you get to take part in lots of varied challenges, Moon Base where you learn the basics of Python and Internet Tools that can be run in python e.g. FTP... You also learn how to use python to Brute Force password protected ZIP files and other securities. The Forensics Base is, well you can guess: Forensics. It teaches you about Cryptography and other hiding methods.

  • PyDev of the Week: Martin Uribe

    While taking some college courses I learned Java, but I didn’t like it much. I know enough of the following to get things done: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Perl, SQL, and BASH. Python is my favorite; I use it pretty much every day even though my job doesn’t require me to code.

  • You can now hone your testing / pytest skills on our platform

    Writing test code is an essential skill. As PyBites we believe writing code is the only solution to becoming a master (Ninja) at programming. The same applies to test code. For that reason we extended our regular exercises with Test Bites. In this article you will read about the feature showcasing it on our first ever Test Bite. We also share some details around implementation and a challenge we hit getting it to work. Enjoy and start honing your testing skills today!

  • unu – Using Qt on embedded Linux

    Right from the start, unu wanted to add a stylish, first-class embedded high-res display to their second generation electric scooter. Like many top-class engineering companies, unu didn’t have in-house expertise for building a modern UI, so they decided to partner with KDAB to build a modern UI based on Qt. In this video you learn more about the development process in this project and why unu chose KDAB as a partner.

Google and fwupd sitting in a tree

I’ve been told by several sources (but not by Google directly, heh) that from Christmas onwards the “Designed for ChromeBook” sticker requires hardware vendors to use fwupd rather than random non-free binaries. This does make a lot of sense for Google, as all the firmware flash tools I’ve seen the source for are often decades old, contain layer-on-layers of abstractions, have dubious input sanitisation and are quite horrible to use. Many are setuid, which doesn’t make me sleep well at night, and I suspect the security team at Google also. Most vendor binaries are built for the specific ODM hardware device, and all of them but one doesn’t use any kind of source control or formal review process. The requirement from Google has caused mild panic among silicon suppliers and ODMs, as they’re having to actually interact with an open source upstream project and a slightly grumpy maintainer that wants to know lots of details about hardware that doesn’t implement one of the dozens of existing protocols that fwupd supports. These are companies that have never had to deal with working with “outside” people to develop software, and it probably comes as quite a shock to the system. To avoid repeating myself these are my basic rules when adding support for a device with a custom protocol in fwupd: I can give you advice on how to write the plugin if you give me the specifications without signing an NDA, and/or the existing code under a LGPLv2+ license. From experience, we’ll probably not end up using any of your old code in fwupd but the error defines and function names might be similar, and I don’t anyone to get “tainted” from looking at non-free code, so it’s safest all round if we have some reference code marked with the right license that actually compiles on Fedora 31. Yes, I know asking the legal team about releasing previously-nonfree code with a GPLish licence is difficult. Read more

Cumulus Networks unveils updates to its Linux OS and NetQ

Cumulus Networks announced on Monday that it has released Cumulus Linux 4.0, which is its network operating system (OS), and version 2.4 of its NetQ network operations toolset. Cumulus Networks' Partho Mishra, president and chief product officer, said Cumulus Linux 4.0 and NetQ 2.4 are key elements in the company's ongoing efforts to enable its customers' automation efforts across data centers and campus networks. "From a solutions standpoint, our focus has been on developing automation and the capabilities that our customers are going after to make their data centers run like an AWS or Google," Mishra said. "The biggest thing they focus on is automation and they've made big strides working with us and using their own resources." Read more