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today's leftovers: Friends of GNOME Update, Canonical, RISC-V, SUSE and dav1d

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  • Welcome to the October 2019 Friends of GNOME Update!

    Molly de Blanc and Sri Ramkrishna were at All Things Open this past month. They both gave talks, ran a booth, and met lots of great people who were excited to learn about GNOME. They ran out of stickers.
    Neil McGovern and Rosanna Yuen attended GNOME.Asia Summit, both delivering keynotes! While he was in Indonesia, Neil also delivered a keynote at openSUSE.Asia Summit.
    Board member Carlos Soriano spoke at GitLab Commit about how GNOME uses GitLab.

  • Learn about our differentiated approach to IoT digital transformation at IoTSWC.

    Canonical will be present at the 2019 IoT Solutions World Congress (IOTSWC) in Barcelona from Tuesday 29th October at booth GV/P2/0/B/224.  We are convening to the flagship IoT event, alongside more than 350 leading suppliers of IoT, artificial intelligence and blockchain solutions. 

    Businesses attending IOTSWC are investing to transform their core activities with emerging digital innovations. Canonical’s mission is to empower innovators – big and small – around the world. To this end, we have developed a uniquely differentiated approach to IoT digital transformation, our goals being to accelerate delivery and boost return on investment.

    The key pillars of our differentiated approach to IoT are open-source software, cloud-native technologies, and platform ecosystems. Our IoT solutions are open source, which drives software quality thanks to community feedback, but also reduces development costs and time to market. What’s more, we are introducing cloud-native technologies like containers, Kubernetes, DevOps, and continuous delivery to the realm of IoT. Finally, we foster platform ecosystems with app stores for any IoT device. App stores enable the development of new business models and feature enhancements through applications.

  • Ubuntu Blog: Standardising software to quickly deliver a smart city platform for millions

    New York has the highest population density of any city in the United States with over 27,000 people per square mile. The average New Yorker has a commute of 40 minutes, 14 more than the national average. There are over 200 languages spoken in the city. These statistics alone illustrate the challenge of communicating to the 8.5m residents of New York to convey the latest transport, weather or security information. 

    The increased use of technology in urban infrastructure and rise of smart cities is helping to improve communications to resident New Yorkers and cities all over the world. Intersection, a US based company, specialise in using digital technology integrated into the physical world with deployments across the US and UK. Notable products include Link which launched in 2016 in New York City and now serves over 8 million Wifi users. The product was also launched in 25 cities throughout the UK, as well as Philadelphia and Newark to provide free Wifi, device charging, maps, calls and real time information such as  weather and transit information.  

    Being visible to millions of people 24/7, Intersection demand a reliable infrastructure on which to build their smart city platform. David Mitchell, of Intersection, explains the breadth of use from retail to emergency services and the challenges of introducing new technology to a variable city environment. 

    “It’s a combination of needing a platform that’s nimble but also at the scale we are running at, having to run a lot of different products while needing to make them look as consistent as possible,” David comments. 

  • Another GD32 RISC-V Development Kit with LCD By Seeed Studio

    Recently we highlighted the $5 Longan Nano, a development kit released by Sipeed for the Gigadevice GD32V RISC-V family of microcontrollers.

  • Movember 2019

    Here at SUSE, we’re a charitable bunch. I know that a few of my colleagues have grown moustaches in years gone by, and our CEO Melissa is very supportive of charity work and volunteering in general. This is my first year trying to build a team of Hairy Green Chameleons, trying to recruit men and women across the business to get involved. Whether that’s by growing a moustache, or committing to getting active with a target of completing 60km of activity over the month, to represent the 60 men that die from suicide each hour around the world. We’ve already had some very generous donations, but I hope that if you’ve read this far, you might find it in your heart to make a donation as well. If you’re a UK tax payer, then don’t forget to click the “reclaim Gift Aid on my donation” box to allow the nice folks at Movember to claim back the tax that you’ve already paid on your donation – giving them extra money at no cost to you!

  • dav1d 0.5.1 Boosts AV1 Video Decode For Older CPUs by 40~50%

    While marketed as a point release, the dav1d 0.5.1 "Asiatic Cheetah" release is quite significant for those needing to perform AV1 video decoding on older processors.

    With the dav1d 0.5.1 release there is around a 50% speed-up for those using the open-source software on SSE2 CPUs. Meanwhile for older Arm CPUs with ARMv7, there is around a 41% speed-up. There are also "minor" speed improvements for other architectures / instruction sets. Dav1d is already quite well optimized for modern CPUs with AVX and the like, so it's nice to see SSE2 and ARMv7 getting some attention.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • Font Management On Linux - YouTube

    Many new-to-Linux users have questions about installing fonts and previewing fonts on Linux. While there are some nice GUI applications that help with these tasks, you don't actually need to install any extra programs to manage your fonts.

  • Dmenu Is Great So I'll Keep Simping For It - YouTube

    At this point the only Suckless tool I actively use is Dmenu, it's an absolute great launcher especially if you're the kind of person who doesn't really care about having a super fancy looking app, Dmenu is functional and that's all it needs to be.

  • Remove ^M (CTRL-M) Characters from a File in Linux - Putorius

    Operating systems have different ways to handle a newline in their text editors. For example Windows uses a specific carriage return (CR) which is depicted as ^M on Linux, followed by a line feed (LF) to indicate a newline. Linux and UNIX on the other hand use only the line feed to denote the end of a line. This often causes issues when transferring (or even copy and pasting) a file from Windows to Linux. It is hard to spot, and often leaves people scratching their head and wondering why their configuration file is not working.

  • How to install fonts in Gimp on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install fonts in Gimp on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to Install Rocket.Chat on CentOS 8

    Rocket.Chat is a free and open-source chat and messaging application built with Meteor. It is an alternative to Slack and allows you to chat with other members, make video and audio calls, create channels and private groups, share files, and folders and many more. It is self-hosted and helps your team to communicate and share ideas on desktop and mobile devices.

  • How to Check Ubuntu Version with Command or Script

    The lsb-release is the standard package for reporting the version on Ubuntu systems. Which is basically written in Python programming language. The lsb-release package provides a command lsb_release used to check Ubuntu version and codename on command line. In this tutorial, you will learn various options to lsb_release command on Ubuntu system.

  • Updated Docker pages

Jetson Xavier system bundles LIPSedge 3D vision camera

LIPS’ IP67-protected “LIPSedge AE400” 3D vision industrial camera is now available with Aaeon’s Linux-driven, AGX Xavier based Boxer-8240AI computer. The RK3399-based camera is built around an Intel RealSense D415 and offers GbE with PoE. Aaeon announced that its Boxer-8240AI edge AI system based on Nvidia’s high-end Jetson AGX Xavier module has received Nvidia Isaac Certification for a bundle that combines the compact, embedded system with LIPS Corp’s LIPSedge AE400 Industrial 3D Camera. The camera is billed as an industrial version of the Intel RealSense dual-lens stereovision camera. Applications for the Aaeon/LIPS offering include autonomous guided vehicles (AGV), vision guided robots, and smart factory systems. Read more

Release of t2 GNU/Linux 20.10

  • T2 20.10 tagged and shipping!

    A decade in the making, T2 version 20.10 was finally tagged and shipped! Grab your favorite release ISO, e.g. highly optimized AMD64, PPC64 for your PS3, MIPS64 for your Sgi Octane or any other of our release builds for playing along at home!

  • t2 Linux 20.10 released

    The 20.10 release of the t2 Linux distribution is available.

Canonical/Ubuntu: FOSDEM 2021 Community DevRoom, Snap Store and Ubuntu Technical Board Call For Nominations

  • Laura Czajkowski: FOSDEM Community Devroom 2021 CFP

    The twenty-first edition of FOSDEM will take place 6-7 February, 2021 – online, and we’re happy to announce that there will be a virtual Community DevRoom as part of the event.

  • When you need the numbers just right – benchmark and profiling applications in the Snap Store | Ubuntu

    The world of software is a vast and complex one, often too difficult to easily assess by human intuition alone. Which is why detailed and accurate measurements of software behavior are essential in helping us understand and gauge how well our applications perform. The Snap Store has a fair share of productivity tools and utilities, including a wide range of benchmarking and profiling tools. These are designed to help developers, system administrators and hardcore enthusiasts get a precise sense of their software, whether as part of research and design or for troubleshooting ongoing problems in production environments. Let’s have a little tour.

  • Ubuntu Fridge | Ubuntu Technical Board Call For Nominations

    The Ubuntu Technical Board is responsible for the technical direction of Ubuntu. It makes decisions on package selection, packaging policy, installation systems and processes, kernel, X server, display management, library versions, and dependencies. The board works with relevant teams to establish a consensus on the right path to take, especially where diverse elements of Ubuntu cannot find consensus on shared components. The current Technical Board is expiring at the end of the year, and the Community Council would like to confirm a new Technical Board, consisting of five people, who will serve for two years.