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Servers: Kubernetes, Linode and Red Hat

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  • Flavors of Data Protection in Kubernetes

    As containerized applications go through an accelerated pace of adoption, Day 2 services have become a here and now problem.

  • Doing the cloud differently

    Jeff Dike, one of the contributors to Linux, had developed a technology called User-mode Linux. UML, as it was known, allowed developers to create virtual Linux machines within a Linux computer. This Matrix-like technology was groundbreaking and opened the door for the virtualized cloud we know today.

    One of the developers Dike’s technology enabled was a young technologist named Christopher Aker. He saw an opportunity to use this technology not to build the next Salesforce or Amazon, but to make cloud computing less complicated, less expensive, and more accessible to every developer regardless of where they were located, what their financial resources were or who they worked for. The company he built — Linode — helped pioneer modern cloud computing.

  • A day in the life of a quality engineering sysadmin

    Let me begin by saying that I was neither hired nor trained to be a sysadmin. But I was interested in the systems side of things such as virtualization, cloud, and other technologies, even before I started working at Red Hat. I am a Senior Software Engineer in Test (Software Quality Engineering), but Red Hat, being positioned so uniquely because its products are something primarily used by sysadmins (or people with job responsibilities along similar lines) and also most of Red Hat’s products are primarily focused on backend systems-level instead of user application level. Our testing efforts include routine interaction with Red Hat’s Virtualization, OpenStack, Ansible Tower, and Hyperconverged Infrastructure.

    When I was hired, I was purely focused on testing Red Hat CloudForms, which is management software for the aforementioned environments. But as one of our previous senior software engineers departed to take on another role within Red Hat, I saw an opportunity that interested me. I was already helping him and learning sysadmin tasks by then, so after looking at my progress and interest, I was a natural successor for the work in my team’s perspective. And hence, I ended up becoming a sysadmin who is working partly as a software engineer in testing.

  • Getting to know Jae-Hyung Jin, Red Hat general manager for Korea

    We’re delighted to welcome Jae-Hyung Jin to Red Hat as a general manager for Korea. In the new role, he will be responsible for Red Hat’s business operations in Korea.
    Prior to joining Red Hat, Jae-Hyung Jin served as head of the enterprise sales and marketing group as a vice president at Samsung Electronics. He has held several key leadership positions in the past at leading technology and trading companies, including Cisco Systems, LG Electronics and Daewoo International. Jae-Hyung brings in nearly 25 years of experience in various industries, including telecommunications, manufacturing, finance and public.

  • Enterprise JavaBeans, infrastructure predictions, and more industry trends

    As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Games: art of rally, Navi, Proton

  • art of rally strips down the furious sport into a serene top-down experience

    From the creator of Absolute Drift comes art of rally, a top-down racing game that heavy on style and it has great gameplay to back it up too. Here's the thing: i don't drive. Not in real life and any attempt at doing so seriously in games always comes with massive amount of hilarious failure. I'm terrible at DiRT Rally, I'm equally as crap at the F1 series, back when GRID Autosport came to Linux a lot of my time was spent on my roof and…you get the idea. They're all actually a little brutal for people like me - which is why I've come to appreciate the calmer side of it all thanks to the magnificent art of rally.

  • A Linux update may have let slip AMD Big Navi's mammoth core specs

    The summer of leaks continues, this time with the attention turning to AMD's next-gen GPUs based on the RDNA 2 architecture, which we'll find out more about on October 28. An enterprising redditor (via Tom's Hardware) was digging around the Radeon Open Compute (ROCm) code and discovered what appears to be a specification list for two of AMD's next generation GPUs.

  • Proton: More Games to Play

    Proton is amazing, and it’s easy to lose sight of all that it can do. Here’s a few videos I picked up recently to showcase some of the latest tested games running on Linux via Proton/Steamplay, as captured in video.

Mozilla: Fake News and AI Fund

  • How to spot (and do something) about real fake news

    Think you can spot fake news when you see it? You might be surprised even the most digitally savvy folks can (at times) be fooled into believing a headline or resharing a photo that looks real, but is actually not.

  • Launching the European AI Fund

    Right now, we’re in the early stages of the next phase of computing: AI. First we had the desktop. Then the internet. And smartphones. Increasingly, we’re living in a world where computing is built around vast troves of data and the algorithms that parse them. They power everything from the social platforms and smart speakers we use everyday, to the digital machinery of our governments and economies. In parallel, we’re entering a new phase of how we think about, deploy, and regulate technology. Will the AI era be defined by individual privacy and transparency into how these systems work? Or, will the worst parts of our current internet ecosystem — invasive data collection, monopoly, opaque systems — continue to be the norm? A year ago, a group of funders came together at Mozilla’s Berlin office to talk about just this: how we, as a collective, could help shape the direction of AI in Europe. We agreed on the importance of a landscape where European public interest and civil society organisations — and not just big tech companies — have a real say in shaping policy and technology. The next phase of computing needs input from a diversity of actors that represent society as a whole.

Is Open Source a Religion?

Is open source a religion? There is a persistent myth that free/open source software (F/OSS) supporters think of F/OSS as a religion. SUSE is the largest open source software company, so that would make us, what, a church with the cutest mascot? Of course this is wrong and F/OSS is not a religion, though the idea of working in a hushed cathedral-like atmosphere with pretty stained glass and organ music is appealing. (Visit St. John’s Cathedral in Spokane, Washington, USA to see a real genuine full-sized pipe organ. When it hits the low notes it rattles your bones from the inside.) If I really want stained glass and my own cathedral I can have those for just because, so let us move on to what F/OSS is really about, and what the value is for everyone who touches it, like customers, vendors, learners, hobbyists, governments– you might be surprised at the reach of F/OSS and its affect on the lives of pretty much everyone. Read more