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Microsoft Windows Goes Ballistic in India

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Security
  • Indian Nuclear Power Facility Denies Unverified Reports of a Cyber Attack

    A statement attributed to R. Ramdoss, the training superintendent and information officer at the plant, clarified that 'Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KKNPP) and other Indian Nuclear Power Plants Control Systems are stand alone and not connected to outside cyber network and Internet,' apparently asserting that physical separation from global networks --or 'air-gapping' --would suffice as a protective measure.

  • Cyber attack at Kudankulam; critical system safe [iophk: Windows TCO]

    'Domain controller-level access [gained] at Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant. The government was notified way back,' said cyber security professional Pukhraj Singh, who in a series of tweets on Monday and Tuesday contended that he was first alerted by a 'third party that discovered the hack and had in turn alerted the National Cyber Security Coordinator on September 3.

  • In these hours an alleged cyber attack on the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant in Tamil Nadu made the headlines, but the KKNPP denies it.

    Worrying news made the headlines, the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP) was hit by a cyber attack. Some users are claiming on the social media that a piece of the 'DTrack' malware has infected the systems at the KKNPP.

    The DTrackmalware was described by Kaspersky in September as a tool that could be used to spy on the victims and exfiltrate data of interest. The malware supports features normally implemented in remote access trojan (RAT). Below a list of some functionalities supported by the Dtrack payload executables analyzed by Kaspersky: [...]

  • Over 15 Indian States Have Been Infected By The Dtrack Malware: Kaspersky Report

    Researchers at Kaspersky had also uncovered "ATMDtrack" back in 2018, a malware that invades the Indian Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) and steal customer card data. "Following further investigation using the Kaspersky Attribution Engine and other tools, the researchers found more than 180 new malware samples which had code sequence similarities with the ATMDtrack - but at the same time clearly were not aimed at ATMs," Kaspersky told IANS.

  • What is Dtrack, the spytool that is to blame for attacks on Indian financial institutions?

    Cybersecurity firm Kaspersky announced the discovery of Dtrack, a hitherto undetected spytool which has proliferated Indian financial institutions and research centres. The new spyware is a different strain of the ARMDtrack malware that was discovered in 2018. It was created to infiltrate ATMs in the country and siphon card data of customers.

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Mozilla: Webcompat, Firefox 71, Privacy Advice and Rust

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    Thinking out loud on separating our images into a separate service. The initial goal was to push the images to the cloud, but I think we could probably have a first step. We could keep the images on our server, but instead of the current save, we could send them to another service, let say upload.webcompat.com with a HTTP PUT. And this service would save them locally.

  • Multiple-column Layout and column-span in Firefox 71

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