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Red Hat: Kubernetes, RHEL Impact and Halloween Release

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Red Hat
  • Why you don't have to be afraid of Kubernetes

    It was fun to work at a large web property in the late 1990s and early 2000s. My experience takes me back to American Greetings Interactive, where on Valentine's Day, we had one of the top 10 sites on the internet (measured by web traffic). We delivered e-cards for AmericanGreetings.com, BlueMountain.com, and others, as well as providing e-cards for partners like MSN and AOL. Veterans of the organization fondly remember epic stories of doing great battle with other e-card sites like Hallmark. As an aside, I also ran large web properties for Holly Hobbie, Care Bears, and Strawberry Shortcake.

    I remember like it was yesterday the first time we had a real problem. Normally, we had about 200Mbps of traffic coming in our front doors (routers, firewalls, and load balancers). But, suddenly, out of nowhere, the Multi Router Traffic Grapher (MRTG) graphs spiked to 2Gbps in a few minutes. I was running around, scrambling like crazy. I understood our entire technology stack, from the routers, switches, firewalls, and load balancers, to the Linux/Apache web servers, to our Python stack (a meta version of FastCGI), and the Network File System (NFS) servers. I knew where all of the config files were, I had access to all of the admin interfaces, and I was a seasoned, battle-hardened sysadmin with years of experience troubleshooting complex problems.

    But, I couldn't figure out what was happening...

    Five minutes feels like an eternity when you are frantically typing commands across a thousand Linux servers. I knew the site was going to go down any second because it's fairly easy to overwhelm a thousand-node cluster when it's divided up and compartmentalized into smaller clusters.

  • The economic impact of Red Hat Enterprise Linux: How IT professionals benefit

    It’s not overstated to say that the IT landscape completely changed with the introduction of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, more than a decade and a half ago. For 2019, IDC estimated a global business revenue of $188 trillion. Of this, they estimate that at least 40% is touched by software, leaving the IT footprint to be an estimated $81 trillion. Yes, you read that right, $81 trillion. As all of this software forming the global business IT footprint has to run on an operating system, IDC estimates that over 50% is running on Linux, with Red Hat Enterprise Linux accounting for 25% of that.

    That’s a lot of big numbers but what does it all mean? It means that Red Hat Enterprise Linux has changed the experience of many IT professionals around the globe. In a software-centric world, ongoing we have seen higher demand in support and IT services which in turn further helps fuel the global IT ecosystem.

    When IDC asked IT organizations how Red Hat Enterprise Linux benefitted them, they discovered a 12% savings in IT staff productivity. This means that IT professionals spend less time managing servers, doing routine IT tasks, resolving support calls, deploying new business apps and upgrading mission-critical apps. But that’s not all.

  • The spooktacular tale of Red Hat's Halloween release

    In many stories and myths, naming is important. Knowing the proper name of something gives you power over it. Likewise, naming has been important for Red Hat Linux over the years.

    The Halloween release was actually a paid beta and not a 1.0. The Halloween release was dubbed Red Hat Software Linux 0.9, and started a tradition of having a codename for the release that lasted through the final Red Hat Linux release (9.0.93, "Severn"), and carried over to Fedora for many years.

    The tradition was to have a name for a release that was somewhat related to the previous release name. For example, the 1.0 release was "Mother's Day," and "Rembrandt" followed "Picasso," and "Colgate" followed it. (For the record, the best release name was a Fedora release, dubbed "Zod." Allowing many fun headlines playing off the Superman II villain.)

More in Tux Machines

Hardware/Modding and 3D Printing (RIP, Sanjay Mortimer)

  • Remembering Sanjay Mortimer, Pioneer And Visionary In 3D Printing | Hackaday

    Over the weekend, Sanjay Mortimer passed away. This is a tremendous blow to the many people who he touched directly and indirectly throughout his life. We will remember Sanjay as pioneer, hacker, and beloved spokesperson for the 3D printing community. If you’ve dabbled in 3D printing, you might recall Sanjay as the charismatic director and co-founder of the extrusion company E3D. He was always brimming with enthusiasm to showcase something that he and his company had been developing to push 3D printing further and further. But he was also thoughtful and a friend to many in the community. Let’s talk about some of his footprints.

  • Grafana Weather Dashboard on the reTerminal by Seeed Studio - The DIY Life

    Today we’re going to be taking a look at the reTerminal, by Seeed Studio. We’ll unbox the device to see what is included and we’ll then set up a weather dashboard on it using Grafana. We’re going to use weather data that is being recorded by an ESP32 microcontroller and is being posted to an InfluxDB database. The reTerminal is a compact HMI (human-machine interface) device that is powered by a Raspberry Pi compute module 4 (CM4). It has a 5″ capacitive touch display, along with four physical function buttons, some status LEDs, and a host of IO options.

  • The Medieval History Of Your Favourite Dev Board | Hackaday

    It’s become something of a trope in our community, that the simplest way to bestow a level of automation or smarts to a project is to reach for an Arduino. The genesis of the popular ecosystem of boards and associated bootloader and IDE combination is well known, coming from the work of a team at the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea, in Northern Italy. The name “Arduino” comes from their favourite watering hole, the Bar di Re Arduino, in turn named for Arduin of Ivrea, an early-mediaeval king. As far as we can see the bar no longer exists and has been replaced by a café, which appears on the left in this Google Street View link. The bar named for Arduin of Ivrea is always mentioned as a side note in the Arduino microcontroller story, but for the curious electronics enthusiast it spawns the question: who was Arduin, and why was there a bar named after him in the first place? The short answer is that Arduin was the Margrave of Ivrea, an Italian nobleman who became king of Italy in 1002 and abdicated in 1014. The longer answer requires a bit of background knowledge of European politics around the end of the first millennium, so if you’re ready we’ll take Hackaday into a rare tour of medieval history.

Programming Leftovers

  • Anti-patterns You Should Avoid in Your Code

    Every developer wants to write structured, simply planned, and nicely commented code. There are even a myriad of design patterns that give us clear rules to follow, and a framework to keep in mind. But we can still find anti-patterns in software that was written some time go, or was written too quickly. A harmless basic hack to resolve an issue quickly can set a precedent in your codebase. It can be copied across multiple places and turn into an anti-pattern you need to address.

  • AsmREPL: Wing your way through x86-64 assembly language • The Register

    Ruby developer and internet japester Aaron Patterson has published a REPL for 64-bit x86 assembly language, enabling interactive coding in the lowest-level language of all. REPL stands for "read-evaluate-print loop", and REPLs were first seen in Lisp development environments such as Lisp Machines. They allow incremental development: programmers can write code on the fly, entering expressions or blocks of code, having them evaluated – executed – immediately, and the results printed out. This was viable because of the way Lisp blurred the lines between interpreted and compiled languages; these days, they're a standard feature of most scripting languages. Patterson has previously offered ground-breaking developer productivity enhancements such as an analogue terminal bell and performance-enhancing firmware for the Stack Overflow keyboard. This only has Ctrl, C, and V keys for extra-easy copy-pasting, but Patterson's firmware removes the tedious need to hold control.

  • Wasmer 2.1 WebAssembly Implementation Adds Virtual Filesystem, Lisp + Crystal Support - Phoronix

    Wasmer as "the universal WebAssembly runtime" that focuses on being able to run WASM code on any platform is out with its next major release. Released this summer was Wasmer 2.0 as a step forward for this open-source WASM implementation. The project remains focused on trying to compile "everything" to WebAssembly and to then run that on any operating system / platform or embed it in other languages or run it in a web browser. Wasmer 2.1 was released today as the next major iteration of the platform.

  • What's The Big Deal With Linux Capabilities? | Hacker Noon

    The prevalent perception is that Linux users benefit from and exercise privileges, however this is not the case. It's the process or executable that runs in a certain user context and exercises rights (permission to carry out to perform the privileged operations guarded by Linux kernel).

  • Built with the Rust programming language – LinuxBSDos.com

    Not too long ago, the talk in developer circles seemed to be mainly about Go, Go, Go, Go… I’m referring, of course, to the programming language from Google.  

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 141: Number Divisors and Like Numbers
  • Closures

    A casual remark about closures which I made in My Favorite Warnings: redefine touched off a long off-topic exchange with Aristotle that I thought ought to be promoted to a top-level blog entry. The big thing I learned was that any Perl subroutine can be a closure. The rest of this blog will try to make clear why I now believe this. The words are my own, as are any errors or misconceptions. The second sentence of Wikipedia's definition of a closure says "Operationally, a closure is a record storing a function together with an environment." This makes it sound a lot like an object, and therefore of little additional interest in an O-O environment. But I came to closures pragmatically through Perl, and to me they were a magic way to make data available somewhere else. All I had to do was get a code reference where it needed to be, and any external lexical variables got the values at the time the reference was taken. So much I understood up to the fatal blog post, and it sufficed for my simple needs.

Servers: Kubernetes, Uptime/Availability Ranks, and EdgeX Foundry

  • Kubernetes Blog: Contribution, containers and cricket: the Kubernetes 1.22 release interview

    The Kubernetes release train rolls on, and we look ahead to the release of 1.23 next week. As is our tradition, I'm pleased to bring you a look back at the process that brought us the previous version. The release team for 1.22 was led by Savitha Raghunathan, who was, at the time, a Senior Platform Engineer at MathWorks. I spoke to Savitha on the Kubernetes Podcast from Google, the weekly* show covering the Kubernetes and Cloud Native ecosystem. Our release conversations shine a light on the team that puts together each Kubernetes release. Make sure you subscribe, wherever you get your podcasts so you catch the story of 1.23. And in case you're interested in why the show has been on a hiatus the last few weeks, all will be revealed in the next episode!

  • Most Reliable Hosting Company Sites in November 2021

    Rackspace had the most reliable hosting company site in November 2021, with an average connection time of just 8ms across the month and no failed requests. Rackspace has appeared in the top 10 most reliable hosting company sites every month of the past 12 months, and has taken the number one spot in five of those. Rackspace offers a wide variety of cloud hosting solutions from over 40 data centres across the Americas, Europe, Asia and Australia. [...] Nine of the top 10 hosting company sites used Linux in October, continuing the dominance of Linux. In ninth place, New York Internet (NYI) used FreeBSD.

  • EdgeX Foundry Announces Jakarta, the Project’s First Long Term Support Release - Linux Foundation

    EdgeX Foundry, a Linux Foundation project under the LF Edge project umbrella, today announced the release of version 2.1 of EdgeX, codenamed ‘Jakarta.’ The project’s ninth release, it follows the recent Ireland release, which was the project’s second major release (version 2.0). Jakarta is significant in that it is EdgeX’s first release to offer long term support (LTS).

Debian: Sparky's Annual Server Donations Drive and Latest Debian Development Reports

  • Sparky: Annual donations for our server 2021

    Until January 31, 2022 we have to collect and pay for the server 1500 PLN / 360 Euros / 430 USD plus min. 2800 PLN / ~ 670 Euros / ~ 800 USD for our monthly living and bills, such as: electricity, gas, water, internet, domains, expenses related to improving the functionality of websites, small computer equipment that wears out constantly (memory, pen drives, mice, batteries, etc. …), fuel, as well as rent, food, drugs and immortal taxes. We are starting the fundraising campaign today to make sure we will pay for the server on time, so we could stay online for you another year. It is our passion and work we do all the times, therefore we believe that with your help we will succeed.

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in November 2021

    This month I accepted 564 and rejected 93 packages. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 591.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in September 2021

    Here’s my (twenty-fourth) monthly but brief update about the activities I’ve done in the F/L/OSS world.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in October 2021

    Here’s my (twenty-fifth) monthly but brief update about the activities I’ve done in the F/L/OSS world.