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today's leftovers

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  • Rugged embedded trio run Linux on Whiskey Lake

    Vecow launched two compact, rugged embedded PCs with Intel's 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-UE. The Linux-ready SPC-5000 and -5100 offer 4x 10Gbps USB 3.1 Gen2 ports and SUMIT expansion with optional 10GbE modules, and the RES-3000 features IP67-protected M12 ports.

    Vecow announced a fanless, rugged SPC-5000 computer and almost identical, but wider-temp SPC-5100, equipped with Intel's 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-UE CPU. Both embedded computers target machine vision, in-vehicle computing, factory automation, ITS, intelligent control, and AIoT/Industry 4.0 applications.

    The SPC-5000/5100 systems appear to be based on Vecow's recently launched, 3.5-inch EMBC-3000 SBC. The EMBC-3000 also powers a larger, more feature-rich SPC-5200 computer that was announced at the same time in early September.

  • GStreamer & automated testing in Lyon

    Following three days at Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Collaborans are continuing their stay in the capital of France’s Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region to take part the annual GStreamer Conference, as well as the Automated Testing Summit.

    Our entire multimedia team will be attending the GStreamer Conference, which takes place at L'Embarcadère on October 31 & November 1. They'll be presenting no less than a dozen times during the conference, on topics including RTP jitter buffer timers, network streaming protocols and PipeWire in the automotive industry. Read below for details & links to each of their talks.

    Back at the Palais des congrès de Lyon where ELCE took place, Gustavo Padovan, Linux Core Technologies Lead, will be taking part in the Automated Testing Summit on October 31. KernelCI will undoubtedly be a hot topic and heavily discussed as it became a Linux Foundation project just a few days ago.

  • Top opensource Android apps

    Since my transition to Linux I have acquired a culture of open source software, a culture that is expanding with every day I spend in Linux. 

    Especially after having seen the importance of open source applications in fighting the monopoly of Big softwares companies such as Microsoft, Apple, Adobe ...

    It has expanded to include even the way I use my smartphone, where I have become inclined to use open source applications, because of my love for open source on the one hand, and on the other hand because of the thirst of commercial software to spy on my personal information as well as the aggressive bad ads that hinder the good use of softwares. 

  • GraphQL a cut above the REST, say query lang's fans: Airbnb, Knotel, others embrace the tech

    At the GraphQL Summit in San Francisco on Wednesday, Matt DeBergalis, co-founder and CTO at data plumbing biz Apollo GraphQL, urged companies to appoint a data graph champion to help ease the implementation of GraphQL, a query language for fetching data.

    It's not yet a given that organizations want to implement GraphQL. But at a gathering arranged by Apollo, which makes the de facto standard open-source client and the commercial Apollo GraphQL Platform, there's a certain incentive to imagine GraphQL everywhere.

    It's already halfway there, at least among the 472 companies attending the show – about 52 per cent of organizations represented are already using the technology in production. Some of the more recognizable names include Airbnb, Audi, Expedia, The New York Times, Medium, PayPal, and Priceline.

  • After Server Breach, NordVPN Has Strengthened Security Measures

    What do you do when you find out the company you were entrusting with your privacy was hacked? Panic? There may have been a lot of that going on when NordVPN admitted to a security breach of their server.

    The good news is that NordVPN is on top of it, and it has already strengthened security measures. But will they be able to trust NordVPN again?

  • Shadow tree encapsulation theory

    Types 3 through 5 do not have any kind of support and type 4 and 5 encapsulation would be hard to pull off due to Spectre. User agents typically use a weaker variant of type 4 for their internal controls, such as the video and input elements, that does not protect confidentiality.

    [...]

    Type 2 encapsulation gives component developers control over what remains encapsulated and what is exposed. You need to take all your users into account and expose the best possible public API for them. At the same time, it protects you from folks taking a dependency on the guts of the component. Aspects you might want to refactor or add functionality to over time. This is much harder with type 1 encapsulation as there will be APIs that can reach into the details of your component and if users do so you cannot refactor it without updating all the callers.

More in Tux Machines

Okular PDF digital signature improvements coming "soon" thanks to NLnet

Starting on January I will be working on a project named "Improve Okular digital signature support" that has received a grant from the NLnet foundation as part of the NGI Assure fund. This will allow me to work part time on Okular (in case it's not clear I work on Okular on a "when I have time-hobby" basis right now), the planned improvements are: 1. Support for signing unsigned signatures. I know it sounds confusing, think about it like something like the old "sign here" boxes on printed paper forms. Read more

FPGA SoC modules gain networking carrier and new PolarFire SoC model

Enclustra’s “Mercury+ PE3” carrier for its FPGA/SoC Mercury/Mercury+ modules can act as an SBC or plug into a PC via PCIe x8. It offers QSFP+, 4x SFP+, FireFly, and 2x GbE. We also examine a new “Mercury+ MP1” module based on the RISC-V based PolarFire SoC. In May, Switzerland based Enclustra announced a Mercury+ ST1 baseboard for its FPGA/SoC powered Mercury and Mercury+ compute modules. These include a Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC based Mercury+ XU6 module that was announced at the same time. Now the company has unveiled a more feature-rich Mercury+ PE3 board for the Mercury/Mercury+ product line. Farther below, we report on a similarly “in development” Mercury+ MP1 module based on Microchip’s based PolarFire SoC, which includes RISC-V based CPU cores and Microchip’s PolarFire FPGA. Read more

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • IBM applauds Knative’s application to join the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Today, Knative applied to become an incubating project at the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Today’s news is a major step in the right direction for the future of Knative. Knative adds the necessary components that enable Kubernetes users to more quickly deploy and manage their workloads on Kubernetes — but without the need to become Kubernetes experts. Additionally, Knative adds “serverless” runtime semantics, allowing users to reap the benefit of features such as quick load-based scaling and scaling to zero when idle.

  • 3 ways to optimize Ansible Automation Platform for scale and performance | Enable Sysadmin

    Try these settings to optimize performance with Ansible Automation Platform on a massive scale.

  • Introduction to Ansible prompts and runtime variables

    This tutorial is part of a series we dedicated to Ansible. Previously we talked about the Ansible basics, then we focused on some Ansible modules we can use to perform some very common administration tasks, and we also talked about Ansible loops. In this article, instead, we learn how to create interactive prompts we can use to ask for user input and how to pass variables at runtime.

  • MIXAL on Fedora | Adam Young’s Web Log

    The examples in The Art of Computer Programming (TAOCP) are in the MIXAL programming language. In order to see these examples run, I want to install the tools on my Fedora box. They are packaged as RPMS, so this is trivial. Here are the steps to run and debug a sample program in MIXAL.

  • Fedora Contributor Annual Survey Data Set Available – Fedora Community Blog

    Over the summer of 2021, the Fedora Council held the first annual Contributor Survey. The survey received 800 complete responses, which exceeded the goal of 500. We have processed the data, which are available for download. Coordination of the survey was a wonderful community effort. Fedora Council member Aleksandra Fedorova proposed and led the survey effort with support from Marie Nordin (FCAIC). Many teams across the Fedora Project contributed, including: the Mindshare Committee, the Outreach Revamp Team, the Design Team, the Websites & Apps Team, and the Community Platform Engineering Team. Aleksandra and Marie presented a session at Nest with Fedora which goes further into the process and outcomes. Over the last couple months, the work of cleaning up the dataset has been underway. This has been a slow process as there are just a couple of people working on that regularly. An example of “cleaning” would be folks who chose “Other”, filled in “idk”, when the option “I don’t know” existed. Those answers need to be integrated in order to have a more accurate dataset. We removed fill-in answers due to the fact that some people identified themselves, intentionally or not. As we process the data, we are noting feedback to improve the survey for 2022.

WordPress 5.9 Beta 1

WordPress 5.9 Beta 1 is now available for testing! This version of the WordPress software is under development. You don’t want to run this version on a production site. Instead, it is recommended that you run this on a test site. This will allow you to test out the new version. Read more Also: People of WordPress: Devin Maeztri