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This months Cosmo

Woo hoo Gals, this months Cosmopolitan magazine is chocked full of nice tips and tricks to tantalize even the most frigid of geeks. Big Grin It looks like Ashley Simpson on the cover, but more importantly are the words: The Power of Pre-sex, Beyond Kama Sutra, His Butt, and 50 Ways to Have Fun With Your Man. I can't wait to try some of this stuff on my man!!!

The Power of Pre-Sex is this nifty article containing 5 tried and true methods for getting his motor running. It's all about tease and stimulation, or as they put it "5 Tricks that will totally rev his engine". Admit it, we don't want them wanting anyone but us right? So, number one on the hit parade is Let Him See Your Bod. According to their experts You Naked is the hottest gift for your guy, so let him soak it up and he'll sizzle to a higher temperature. It even goes so far as to suggest throwing him on the bed, straddle him, and give him a strip tease. Show a little boobie and cover it up. Show a little inner thigh and cover it up. Then when you finally do get to the point of revealing the goodies, do it nice and sloooow. Then tip two: Use Your Breath. Apparently slowly exhaling in just the right spots will create a temperature change in his skin and heighten arousal. Woooo baby. Number three is Play a little Rough. Men crave seduction as much as a woman and being aggressive or even animalistic is a "sign of lust and an indication that she's as into it as he is." They suggest siezing control and getting him into a "gotta-have-it now lip-lock." Number four: Tantalize with Touch. Cosmo contends guys liked to be touched and not just in that one area. They suggest butt massages and long but gentle scratches up and down their back. In fact mixing up hard massage and long nail strokes and surprize pinches seems to turn a fellar right on. And finally Bring him to the Brink. Yes, just what you imagine. Do what ever it is you do to bring him to the brink and then easing up, not necessarily stopping, but put off the good thing for a while. They say if you do this a few times it can really increase the pleasure of the final moment. That final one sounds like a plan, but I wouldn't classify it pre! Big Grin

This months cosmo has many many more features such as Cosmo's Condom Round-up, This year's Fun and Fearless, Confessions, and February's Cosmo Commandments. ...Available at your favorite newsstand or retail outlet.

More in Tux Machines

Missing documentation and the reproduction problem

I recently took some criticism over the fact that reposurgeon has no documentation that is an easy introduction for beginners. After contemplating the undeniable truth of this criticism for a while, I realized that I might have something useful to say about the process and problems of documentation in general – something I didn’t already bring out in How to write narrative documentation. If you haven’t read that yet, doing so before you read the rest of this mini-essay would be a good idea. “Why doesn’t reposurgeon have easy introductory documentation” would normally have a simple answer: because the author, like all too many programmers, hates writing documentation, has never gotten very good at it, and will evade frantically when under pressure to try. But in my case none of that description is even slightly true. Like Donald Knuth, I consider writing good documentation an integral and enjoyable part of the art of software engineering. If you don’t learn to do it well you are short-changing not just your users but yourself. So, with all that said, “Why doesn’t reposurgeon have easy introductory documentation” actually becomes a much more interesting question. I knew there was some good reason I’d never tried to write any, but until I read Elijah Newren’s critique I never bothered to analyze for the reason. He incidentally said something very useful by mentioning gdb (the GNU symbolic debugger), and that started me thinking, and now think I understand something general. If you go looking for gdb intro documentation, you’ll find it’s also pretty terrible. Examples of a few basic commands is all they can do; you never get an entire worked example of using gdb to identify and fix a failure point. And why is this? The gdb maintainers probably aren’t very self-aware about this, but I think at bottom it’s because the attempt would be futile. Yes, you could include a session capture of someone diagnosing and debugging a simple problem with gdb, but the reader couldn’t reliably reproduce it. How would you the user go about generating a binary on which the replicating the same commands produced the same results? For an extremely opposite example, consider the documentation for an image editor such as GIMP. It can have excellent documentation precisely because including worked examples that the reader can easily understand and reproduce is almost trivial to arrange. Read more

today's howtos

Andrew Tridgell and Genevieve Bell awarded Australia Day honors

Dr Andrew James Tridgell - know in the open source commmunity as 'Tridge' - has been awarded a medal in the general division of the Order of Australia (OAM). [...] RSync is a powerful and ubiquitous file synchronisation utility that is an essential part of any Linux sysadmin's toolkit, in part because it only synchs files that have changed and therefore makes it possible to sync without using unnecessary network resources, Samba is a free implementation of Server Message Block that underpins Windows networking. Samba runs on Unix-like systems and its mere existence was a huge factor in the rise of Linux as it allowed the open source OS to more easily integrate with Windows servers. Both RSync and Samba are very, very, widely used - it's not a stretch to say they're both crucial underpinnings of modern computing. Read more

Review of FuryBSD 12.0

FuryBSD is the most recent addition to the DistroWatch database and provides a live desktop operating system based on FreeBSD. FuryBSD is not entirely different in its goals from NomadBSD, which we discussed recently. I wanted to take this FreeBSD-based project for a test drive and see how it compares to NomadBSD and other desktop-oriented projects in the FreeBSD family. FuryBSD supplies hybrid ISO/USB images which can be used to run a live desktop. There are two desktop editions currently, both for 64-bit (x86_64) machines: Xfce and KDE Plasma. The Xfce edition is 1.4GB in size and is the flavour I downloaded. The KDE Plasma edition is about 3.0GB in size. Booting from the live media brings up the Xfce 4.14 desktop environment. Along the bottom of the screen is a panel which holds the application menu, task switcher and system tray. Icons on the desktop open the Thunar file manager, launch the system installer, and provide quick access to a Getting Started document. There are two more icons for accessing X.Org configuration options and showing system information. The Getting Started document is a quick reference text file containing command line instructions for setting up networking and installing video drivers. The System Information icon opens the Firefox web browser and displays a locally generated page which contains general information about our computer and its resource usage. Read more