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AMD Navi 22 and Navi 23 Show Up In Linux Driver

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

References to Navi 22 and Navi 23 silicon have been spotted inside a Linux driver by a 3DCenter forum veteran known as Berniyh (you can find them here and here). Could these be the high-end Navi parts Lisa Su was referring to in August?

Nvidia has been sitting peacefully alone in the premium graphics card market. Although AMD has already launched its Navi-based graphics cards (AMD Radeon RX 5700 and 5700 XT) the chipmaker still doesn't have an answer for Nvidia's high-end offerings, such as the GeForce RTX 2080 Super or RTX 2080 Ti. Berniyh's discovery doesn't mean big Navi is landing tomorrow, but it is coming.

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Linux drivers confirm high-end Radeon Navi GPUs

  • Linux drivers confirm high-end Radeon Navi GPUs, detail new budget cards

    Starting in the budget category, it appears AMD has five Navi 14 GPUs in the works. The driver lists the Navi 14 XT, XTM, XL, XLM, and the XTX. The first two are the previously announced 5500 and 5500M (the mobile version). The codenames indicate the next two are a cheaper variant and its accompanying mobile version, probably the 5300 we saw listed in an unreleased HP gaming PC last September. For the 5700-series, the XTX codename denoted the overclocked 50th Anniversary Edition card, so we’ll have to wait and see how that works for Navi 14.

    The driver also contained various numbers that aligned with the base clocks for the 5500 and 5500M, so we’ve interpreted them as being base clocks for the other three cards too. They’re about what you’d expect. While we don’t have any information about core count, it seems the 5300 cards would likely have slightly less than the 5500’s 1408.

AMD's Navi 22 and Navi 23 GPUs recently spotted in Linux driver

  • AMD's Navi 22 and Navi 23 GPUs recently spotted in Linux driver

    It seems like only yesterday when AMD President and CEO Dr. Lisa Su promised that high-end 7nm Navi-powered graphics cards are on the way. Now, signs of such premium graphics cards are starting to pop up.

    As reported by Tom’s Hardware, 3DCenter forum member Berniyh recently spotted Navi 22 and Navi 23 graphics cards (GPUs) show up for the first time, and in a Linux driver. So naturally, people are speculating that they may be the premium GPUs that Dr. Lisa Su was talking about back in August.

Linux Driver Update Hints At Upcoming AMD Graphics Cards

  • Linux Driver Update Hints At Upcoming AMD Graphics Cards

    With Linux releasing its latest operating system drivers, some users can’t help but delve into them to see if there’s anything interesting lurking within. It might sound a bit weird, but these driver updates have proven (very consistently) to be solid indicators of upcoming tech releases.

    So, with the latest version out, what has been discovered this time? Well, in a report via TechSpot, the new Linux drivers confirm at least 4 new upcoming AMD graphics cards as well as hints towards their reported high-end release/s.

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