Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

IBM: OpenShift, Greenpeace greenwash, RHEL and Red Hat Insights

Filed under
Red Hat
  • OpenShift Developer experience feedback: Take the survey, join community sessions

    We’ve recently added several feedback loops aimed at increasing customer and community involvement in order to better understand how developers create, build, manage, test, and deploy their applications on and for Red Hat OpenShift.

  • Open by nature: What building a platform for activists taught me about playful development

    Participating in a design sprint with colleagues at Greenpeace reminded me of that. As I explained in the first two parts of this series, learning to think, plan, and work the open way is helping us build something truly great—a new, global platform for engaging activists who want to take action on behalf of our planet.

    The sprint experience (part of a collaboration with Red Hat) reinforced several lessons about openness I've learned throughout my career as an advocate for open source, an architect of change, and a community organizer.

  • What’s new in RHEL 8.1: Kernel patching, more Insights, and right on time

    Last week we celebrated the 25th anniversary of Red Hat’s inaugural Halloween release. This week? We’ve got Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 hitting the streets on schedule and ready to take on your toughest workloads. In RHEL 8.1 we have some new tools, live kernel patching, a new system role, and more. Here’s a quick preview of the highlights in RHEL 8.1.

  • What’s new in Red Hat Insights for November, 2019?

    For Red Hat Insights, 2019 has been an exceptional year. Insights provides proactive management and remediation guidance as a Software-as-a-Services (SaaS) solution, and this has become available as part of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) subscription to add new value to this already strong subscription. Our customers are showing their appreciation for this value as we can see in its robust growth in adoption. Since being announced at Red Hat Summit, we have continued to innovate on Insights and I want to update you on some key enhancements.

    [...]

    Once you register the Insights client, you can browse the rules section to see specific risks on your own environments. You can also look on a system-by-system basis to see which systems have matched these rules and most require your attention. As shown in the screenshot below, you can uncheck the "Show rules with hits" box at the top if you want to see the breadth of these 1,000+ rules, regardless of whether there is a match for them on your RHEL environments. (See Figure 1.)

Red Hat Ups the IQ of the Intelligent Operating System

  • Red Hat Ups the IQ of the Intelligent Operating System with the Latest Release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1, the latest version of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform. The first minor release of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 platform, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 enhances the manageability, security and performance of the operating system underpinning the open hybrid cloud while also adding new capabilities to drive developer innovation.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Officially Released

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 is here to deliver more intelligent management through enhanced automation, new enterprise-grade security enhancements, updated drivers for better hardware support, greater developer productivity, as well as yet another layer of performance enhancements to keep the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 operating system a reliable, stable, and secure platform for hybrid clouds and other enterprise environments.

    Highlights of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 include container-centric SELinux profiles to allow system administrators to create security policies that are more tailored to their needs for better control over container access of a host system's resources, such as compute, network, and storage, as well as application whitelisting, which lets sysadmins be more selective of the applications that are allowed to be launched on a machine, reducing the risk of malicious apps.

Red Hat announces RHEL 8.1 with predictable release cadence

  • Red Hat announces RHEL 8.1 with predictable release cadence

    Red Hat has just today announced the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.1, promising improvements in manageability, security and performance.

    RHEL 8.1 will enhance the company’s open hybrid-cloud portfolio and continue to provide a consistent user experience between on-premises and public-cloud deployments.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Released With Kernel Live-Patching

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Released With Kernel Live-Patching Support

    Red Hat this morning announced the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1, the first update to RHEL8 since its general availability in May.

    Arguably most notable with RHEL 8.1 is that kernel live-patching is now officially supported on RHEL for applying kernel security updates without reboots. This comes after Red Hat for years has worked on Kpatch and the in-kernel live-patching infrastructure.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Debuts With Added Developer Tools

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Debuts With Added Developer Tools, Security & Automation

    Red Hat, Inc. today announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1, the latest version of the world's leading enterprise Linux platform. The first minor release of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 platform, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 enhances the manageability, security and performance of the operating system underpinning the open hybrid cloud while also adding new capabilities to drive developer innovatio

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 adds live Linux kernel patching

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 adds live Linux kernel patching

    Six months after Red Hat released the most recent major update of its flagship operating system, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8, the first minor RHEL 8 release of the RHEL 8.1 brings significant improvements to manageability, security, and hybrid cloud performance.

    First and foremost, in my mind, RHEL 8.1 8.1 now has full support for live kernel patching. You can now update your Linux kernel for Critical or Important Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVEs) without needing to go to the trouble of a system reboot. This keeps your system up and running even serious security bugs are patched behind the scenes.

LWN

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 released

    Red Hat has announced the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1. This is the first update in what is planned to be a 6 month cadence for minor releases. The release notes contain more information.

How Red Hat is helping to drive accelerated AI

  • From the core to the edge: How Red Hat is helping to drive accelerated AI into the mainstream

    In the face of changing technology demands, local municipalities and federal governments alike can struggle to keep existing infrastructure operational while striving to meet the growing need to support their communities with advanced technologies. These can include 5G, artificial intelligence (AI) / machine learning (ML) and Internet of Things (IoT), all critical pieces that meet constituent demands for better, faster and more efficient services, but also come with steep IT requirements. 5G infrastructure alone necessitates an unprecedented physical footprint at a street and building level in order to serve the number of IoT devices anticipated to be operating on 5G networks. That number is projected to be as high as 1,000,000 devices per square kilometer (roughly the size of four city blocks).

    IoT and 5G technologies are key components in creating smart cities, where data from sensors, cameras, and specialized connected devices must be processed in real-time to provide insight and assistance with traffic congestion management, crime prevention, and asset and property maintenance. But smart cities are just one symptom of a growing challenge facing public sector organizations. The bigger question is: How do these organizations address the need for computing demand outside their core datacenter, at the literal edge of the network? Adding to this complexity is the proliferation of microservices-based, cloud native applications running on container management Kubernetes platforms, a wholesale sea of change in how traditional IT operations are conducted.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.1 arrives with live kernel

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.1 arrives with live kernel patching

    Red Hat has announced the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.1, the first point release since RHEL 8 launched back in May. While point releases in the Linux world don’t tend to bring big changes, RHEL 8.1 does. One of the key highlights with this update is the availability of live kernel patching, allowing systems to be updated without having to go offline for a reboot.

    Unlike some other operating systems, Linux rarely has to reboot for patches to be applied which is great for businesses that use Linux to run servers that need to be online for as much time as possible. One of the exceptions to this rule is kernel patches, they tend to require a whole system reboot to be applied but live kernel patching resolves this issue without a restart; this will help businesses to keep their services running around the clock.

Red Hat Linux 8.1, Now Generally Available, Adds New Automation

  • Red Hat Linux 8.1, Now Generally Available, Adds New Automation Capabilities

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 enhances the manageability, security and performance of the operating system underpinning the open hybrid cloud while also adding new capabilities to drive developer innovation.

    Red Hat, Inc., the provider of open source solutions, recently announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1.

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 comes with improved manageability, security, and performance of the operating system underpinning the open hybrid cloud while also combining innovative capabilities to accelerate developer innovation.

Red Hat Announces Latest Release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

The world's fastest supercomputers hit higher speeds than ever with Linux

Yes, there's a lot of talk now about how quantum computers can do jobs in 200 seconds that would take the world's fastest supercomputers 10,000 years. That's nice. But the simple truth is, for almost all jobs, supercomputers are faster than anything else on the planet. And, in the latest Top 500 supercomputer ratings, the average speed of these Linux-powered racers is now an astonishing 1.14 petaflops. The fastest of the fast machines haven't changed since the June 2019 Top 500 supercomputer list. Leading the way is Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Summit system, which holds top honors with an HPL result of 148.6 petaflops. This is an IBM-built supercomputer using Power9 CPUs and NVIDIA Tesla V100 GPUs. Read more

Programming: Django, Python and Qt

  • Introducing DjangoCon Africa

    Following the huge success of PyCon Africa, the Django community in Africa is ready to bring a new major software event to the continent - the very first DjangoCon Africa! The Django Software Foundation is excited to endorse and support this initiative. Plans are already in motion for a DjangoCon Africa to be held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in November 2020. Actual dates to be announced as soon as key details are in place. DjangoCon Africa will include 3 days of single-track talks, 1 day of workshops and sprints, and another day for touring for international visitors. The event will also include a Django Girls workshop to be held the weekend before DjangoCon Africa. To make the conference as inclusive as possible, the event will offer financial aid to members of under-represented communities in software to ensure they can also attend.

  • Django 3.0 release candidate 1 released

    Django 3.0 release candidate 1 is the final opportunity for you to try out the raft of new features before Django 3.0 is released. The release candidate stage marks the string freeze and the call for translators to submit translations. Provided no major bugs are discovered that can't be solved in the next two weeks, Django 3.0 will be released on or around December 2. Any delays will be communicated on the django-developers mailing list thread.

  • Cyber Discovery - What it is all about

    Cyber Discovery is made of 4 rounds. The first one being CyberStart Assess. It ran from the 3rd September to the 25th October 2019. There are 10 challenges starting easy, getting much harder. The aim for most of the challenges are to use 'Inspect Element' to get into the website and find the flag. I completed all of these challenges and was invited onto the next round: CyberStart Game. CyberStart Game is much more about finding things out yourself. A useful tip if you are stuck is to search for help on Google. CyberStart Game has 3 'Bases': Headquarters where you get to take part in lots of varied challenges, Moon Base where you learn the basics of Python and Internet Tools that can be run in python e.g. FTP... You also learn how to use python to Brute Force password protected ZIP files and other securities. The Forensics Base is, well you can guess: Forensics. It teaches you about Cryptography and other hiding methods.

  • PyDev of the Week: Martin Uribe

    While taking some college courses I learned Java, but I didn’t like it much. I know enough of the following to get things done: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Perl, SQL, and BASH. Python is my favorite; I use it pretty much every day even though my job doesn’t require me to code.

  • You can now hone your testing / pytest skills on our platform

    Writing test code is an essential skill. As PyBites we believe writing code is the only solution to becoming a master (Ninja) at programming. The same applies to test code. For that reason we extended our regular exercises with Test Bites. In this article you will read about the feature showcasing it on our first ever Test Bite. We also share some details around implementation and a challenge we hit getting it to work. Enjoy and start honing your testing skills today!

  • unu – Using Qt on embedded Linux

    Right from the start, unu wanted to add a stylish, first-class embedded high-res display to their second generation electric scooter. Like many top-class engineering companies, unu didn’t have in-house expertise for building a modern UI, so they decided to partner with KDAB to build a modern UI based on Qt. In this video you learn more about the development process in this project and why unu chose KDAB as a partner.

Google and fwupd sitting in a tree

I’ve been told by several sources (but not by Google directly, heh) that from Christmas onwards the “Designed for ChromeBook” sticker requires hardware vendors to use fwupd rather than random non-free binaries. This does make a lot of sense for Google, as all the firmware flash tools I’ve seen the source for are often decades old, contain layer-on-layers of abstractions, have dubious input sanitisation and are quite horrible to use. Many are setuid, which doesn’t make me sleep well at night, and I suspect the security team at Google also. Most vendor binaries are built for the specific ODM hardware device, and all of them but one doesn’t use any kind of source control or formal review process. The requirement from Google has caused mild panic among silicon suppliers and ODMs, as they’re having to actually interact with an open source upstream project and a slightly grumpy maintainer that wants to know lots of details about hardware that doesn’t implement one of the dozens of existing protocols that fwupd supports. These are companies that have never had to deal with working with “outside” people to develop software, and it probably comes as quite a shock to the system. To avoid repeating myself these are my basic rules when adding support for a device with a custom protocol in fwupd: I can give you advice on how to write the plugin if you give me the specifications without signing an NDA, and/or the existing code under a LGPLv2+ license. From experience, we’ll probably not end up using any of your old code in fwupd but the error defines and function names might be similar, and I don’t anyone to get “tainted” from looking at non-free code, so it’s safest all round if we have some reference code marked with the right license that actually compiles on Fedora 31. Yes, I know asking the legal team about releasing previously-nonfree code with a GPLish licence is difficult. Read more

Cumulus Networks unveils updates to its Linux OS and NetQ

Cumulus Networks announced on Monday that it has released Cumulus Linux 4.0, which is its network operating system (OS), and version 2.4 of its NetQ network operations toolset. Cumulus Networks' Partho Mishra, president and chief product officer, said Cumulus Linux 4.0 and NetQ 2.4 are key elements in the company's ongoing efforts to enable its customers' automation efforts across data centers and campus networks. "From a solutions standpoint, our focus has been on developing automation and the capabilities that our customers are going after to make their data centers run like an AWS or Google," Mishra said. "The biggest thing they focus on is automation and they've made big strides working with us and using their own resources." Read more