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Microsoft promotes proprietary software using "Linux" (so "Linux" news today is all Microsoft)

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Some memes about it

You take something that already supports GNU/Linux and has supported it for ages. You then ask GNU/Linux users if they want this thing supported, just to pretend you 'love Linux'. Good luck with that. The media will totally fall for that stunt.

Good evening, sir. Can we interest you in a proprietary Microsoft browser? Good evening, sir. There's already Chromium and it's not proprietary like Microsoft's. But it's based on Chromium and it lets Microsoft spy on everything. Get out!!!

Sites that tell us they cover Linux news'... End up covering proprietary software/spyware of Microsoft because like Chromium it can be compiled for GNU/Linux

Sorry, Microsoft, but your Edge web browser...

  • Sorry, Microsoft, but your Edge web browser will NEVER be installed on my Linux computer

    As you may know, I am a big proponent of Linux on the desktop. I prefer Fedora to both Windows 10 and macOS, and I use the operating system regularly to get work done. Over the years, I went from being a minority as a desktop Linux user, to... well... OK, fine, we desktop Linux users are still a minority. But hey, we are getting more respect every year, and people are increasingly turning to Chromebooks, which run the Linux-based Chrome OS. More and more developers, including Microsoft, are releasing software for Linux too.

    With all of that said, I probably should be excited that Microsoft is bringing its Chromium-based Edge to Linux. After all, it is another indicator that Linux is gaining mainstream support. Not to mention, who can be mad at having just another web browser option? Me, that's who. You see, Microsoft's Edge browser will NEVER be installed on my Linux computer.

Microsoft Edge is officially coming to Linux soon

Microsoft Is Bringing Edge to Linux Too

"Hell freezes over"

Jack Wallen: Microsoft Edge Coming to Linux

  • Microsoft Edge Coming to Linux

    For the longest time, any Linux user needing to work with a Microsoft browser had few options. There was always IEs4Linux, but that option tended to install out-of-date, buggy versions of the software. Users could also run a version of Windows within a virtual machine, but that meant actually running Windows.

Microsoft Edge For Linux “Confirmed” By Microsoft

  • Microsoft Edge For Linux “Confirmed” By Microsoft

    icrosoft has now officially confirmed that its revamped Chromium-based Edge browser will be arriving on Linux machines in the coming future. The confirmation was made during the State of Browser: Microsoft Edge session at the Ignite conference in Orlando.

Confirmed! Microsoft Edge Will be Available on Linux

  • Confirmed! Microsoft Edge Will be Available on Linux

    Microsoft tried to gain its lost position by creating Edge, a brand new web browser built with EdgeHTML and Chakra engine. It was tightly integrated with Microsoft’s digital assistant Cortana and Windows 10.

    However, it still could not bring the crown home and as of today, it stands at the fourth position in desktop browser usage share.

Now in Slashdot

Microsoft Edge is coming to Linux. But will anybody use it?

  • Microsoft Edge is coming to Linux. But will anybody use it?

    At Microsoft Ignite last week, a slide announced that Microsoft's project to rebase its perennially unloved Edge browser on Google's open source project Chromium is well underway. Release candidates for the new Chromium-based Edge build are available on consumer and server versions of Windows (including Windows 7 and Server 2008, which have already left mainstream support), as well as MacOS, Android, and iOS.

    [...]

    It seems unlikely that the Linux world is going to go ga-ga for what seems to essentially be a reskinning of Chromium—but that might be missing Microsoft's real thrust here. Many developers—including Linux developers—choose Azure over rival cloud services like Amazon Web Services or Google Cloud, and bringing Edge to Linux may represent little more than a way to offer those developers deeper ties into Microsoft's profile and identity management services.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 5.5 Kernel Development: Latest

  • Re: [GIT PULL] treewide conversion to sizeof_member() for v5.5-rc1
    On Sat, Dec 7, 2019 at 11:48 AM Kees Cook wrote:
    >
    > Please pull this mostly mechanical treewide conversion to the single and
    > more accurately named sizeof_member() macro for the end of v5.5-rc1.
    
    So this one I'm _still_ not convinced about. It makes yet another name
    for something we've had before, which just annoys me. And maybe it's
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    I _can_ see why we'd want to standardize on one of the tree versions
    we have, but I can't really see the problem with the existing #define
    that we have, and that is used (admittedly not all that much):
    sizeof_field().
    
  • Linus Rejects "Size Of Member" Change From Linux 5.5 Kernel

    This weekend was the last-minute pull request by Google's Kees Cook to introduce the new sizeof_member() macro that had been previously rejected from Linux 5.4. Well, it was again rejected by Linus Torvalds prior to tagging the Linux 5.5-rc1 kernel. The sizeof_member() macro has been aimed to unify 2~3 other macros within the kernel tree currently and using the size-of-field moniker, but Cook argued that for measuring the size of a member of a C struct, the new macro is more appropriate and converted usage of the old macros to this new single macro.

  • WireGuard Sends Out Latest Patch Revision In Preparing For Linux 5.6

    While there are some pretty great features for Linux 5.5, one that didn't make it quite in time was the long-awaited introduction of WireGuard as the in-kernel secure VPN tunnel. While it was a bummer it didn't make 5.5, all indications are at this point is that it will be in Linux 5.6. With Linux 5.5 the crypto subsystem adopted some elements of WireGuard's "Zinc" crypto code and that in turn opened the door for merging WireGuard now that the cryptography side was sorted out. But WireGuard was too late for introduction in net-next even with a last minute attempt trying to get it into 5.5, but instead it's aiming early for merging to net-next to ensure it's timely introduction with Linux 5.6.

Android Leftovers

Breathe Life Back Into Your Late 2013 Or Older Apple Mac With Linux

I receive a ton of great questions about using Linux, but it’s challenging to answer them all personally. Going forward, I’ve decided to write answers to some of these questions so a wider audience can benefit from them. One recurring theme that’s constantly hitting my inbox centers around installing Linux on an older MacBook. Read more

today's leftovers

  • $100M open source fund via Codefresh launches

    From the deck of the HMS Surprise pirate ship at the Maritime Museum of San Diego, on the eve of Kubecon, Codefresh announced the establishment of a $100 Million Open Source Fund offering grants up to $1 Million. This “heave-ho” is designed to foster the growth and expediency of open source projects from development and deployment to ongoing maintenance. “Open source is part of every project and drives change in the modern world at an incredible pace,” said Dan Garfield, Chief Technology Evangelist of Codefresh. “Codefresh has contributed to open source projects related to Kubernetes such as Helm and Chart Museum, and many open-source projects have used Codefresh to power their CI/CD and software delivery supply chain. The Codefresh $100 Million Open Source Fund is a way to give even more back to the community that has embraced and empowered Codefresh from the beginning.”

  • WhiteSource and Codefresh Combine Forces to Offer Built-in Open Source Management in CI/CD Pipelines [Ed: Codefresh now liaising with anti-FOSS Microsoft 'proxy', WhiteSource. This makes one wonder what or who Codefresh will help with money...]
  • EU backs open source tool to help investors reach Paris climate target [Ed: Article stranded. Paywall.]

    The 2° Investing Initiative (2dii) and Beyond Ratings have launched an EU-backed open source tool which they say can help investors become Paris-aligned and assess their risk of stranded assets.

  • Ransomware at Colorado IT Provider Affects 100+ Dental Offices [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Multiple sources affected say their IT provider, Englewood, Colo. based Complete Technology Solutions (CTS), was hacked, allowing a potent strain of ransomware known as “Sodinokibi” or “rEvil” to be installed on computers at more than 100 dentistry businesses that rely on the company for a range of services — including network security, data backup and voice-over-IP phone service.

    Reached via phone Friday evening, CTS President Herb Miner declined to answer questions about the incident. When asked about reports of a ransomware attack on his company, Miner simply said it was not a good time and hung up.

  • Big Tech Should Stay Out of Healthcare

    Big Tech is moving into health care. Google has announced an intention to buy Fitbit and is also poised to collect health data on tens of millions of patients through a deal with the St. Louis-based hospital chain Ascension. In March, Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and J.P. Morgan announced their health venture, Haven. Apple is using its devices to help academics run studies with millions of participants. And Microsoft and IBM are using artificial intelligence and machine learning to help researchers develop better cancer treatments. The use of digital technology in health care has enormous promise, to be sure. But, as the Wall Street Journal’s coverage of Google’s Project Nightingale revealed, there is also a potential dark side to these projects. Ascension, it noted, “also hopes to mine data to identify additional tests that could be necessary or other ways in which the system could generate more revenue from patients, documents show.” That detail raises a key question that’s largely overlooked in our health care debates: should the drive to maximize corporate revenues determine how health information technology develops and becomes integrated into medical practice, or should that be determined by medical science and the public?