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Games: Old Games, Steam, OGRE, Rocket League, Transport Fever and Wayward

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  • Internet Archive Releases 2,500 More MS-DOS Games

    Most of us here can remember the bunches and bunches of high quality MS-DOS games that were around in the late 80s and into the 90s. I know we all had our favorites. One of the very first games I got inextricably "hooked" on was Wolfenstein 3D, from id Software. I can't even begin to calculate how many hours I sat in front of that computer screen, much to the dismay of my then wife, playing that game.

    Thus began my pseudo love affair with the games from id Software. I graduated from all things Wolfenstein to all things Doom. Then I moved from all things Doom to all things Quake. In between, I also found games like Descent and The Daedalus Encounter to also consume large amounts of my time.

    I was never much good at any of them, but they were still fun to play. To this day, while I'm definitely NOT a gamer, I find them all still fun to play. Especially the Wolfenstein games, which fit nicely with my intense interest in all things related to World War II. Even while writing this article, it was hard to pull myself away from playing Wolfenstein 3D.

  • Looks like Valve could be set to launch something called Steam Cloud Gamin

    We have Google Stadia, PlayStation Now, Xbox Game Streaming and more but what about Valve with Steam? Well, sounds like Steam Cloud Gaming is coming.

    For those who don't remember or perhaps aren't regular readers, I actually wrote an article back in November 2018 describing how I thought Valve would launch such a service. Well, there's more pointing towards me being right in some way about that.

  • The FOSS rendering engine OGRE is being ported to Vulkan

    Some fun news for game developers and the Vulkan ecosystem as another FOSS rendering engine is being ported over to Vulkan.

    It's very early days yet though, to be clear on that. In a blog post written by developer Matias Goldberg, they confirmed "Yes, we’re working on Vulkan support." a

  • Another big SteamVR update is out now, with plenty of Linux fixes for VR enthusiasts

    SteamVR 1.8 is now out of Beta and with it, comes plenty of updates to the whole system with some big audio changes and some good sounding Linux fixes.

    The biggest changes seem to be on the audio side of SteamVR with this release. By default, SteamVR will now select the correct audio input and output devices that actually belong to the active VR HMD. Valve said this works with the Index, Vive, Vive Pro, Rift and Rift S. OpenVR HMD drivers will also "in the near future" be able to tell SteamVR about audio devices too, so that's great. They've updated the settings UI too, to reflect this as you can override the audio input/output. Additionally, if you saw your audio settings vanish after updates, they fixed multiple problems there. There's plenty more, like SteamVR now actually restoring audio settings to their correct prior state, Index HMDs default to 40% audio instead of 100% when run for the first time, so newer users shouldn't get such a shock and so on.

  • Psyonix talk more about the upcoming Blueprint system for Rocket League

    Coming soon to Rocket League is the replacement of loot boxes, part of this is the new previously announced Blueprint system and Psyonix are now ready to talk a little more about it.

    Once the update goes live (next month), you will earn revealed Blueprints from playing online matches. You can use credits to then build whatever it is, trade it or keep it in your inventory. A much clearer system than loot boxes that's for sure. As a reminder, any loot boxes you have left when it goes live will turn into special unrevealed Blueprints.

  • Transport Fever 2 confirmed for release on December 11, Linux support included

    Entering the GOL mailbox today is an announcement about Transport Fever 2 getting a release date! It's arriving on December 11, with Linux support ready for release.

    Developed by Urban Games and publisher Good Shepherd Entertainment, they're saying that Transport Fever 2 gives you more than 150 years of real-world technology and history to design and master your own transportation empire with a vastly improved feature set, user interface and modding capabilities. You will be building vast transport networks across land, sea and air with over 200 "realistically modeled vehicles" from Europe, America and Asia.

  • Wilderness survival game Wayward has a massive feature update

    Seemingly stranded on an unknown island, Wayward is an indie pixel-art game of surviving in the wilderness. No character classes with special skills, here you level up and progress by your interactions with the world. You go at your own pace, do what you want. Just survive.

    After a long wait, the big 2.8 update has landed adding in some huge new features. Three new creatures, one of which has a special secret unique mechanic apparently. Over 30 new items and crafts made it into the game, the ability to refine items to reduce their weight, new tile variations, a big new "Milestone Modifiers" mechanic that grants you specials upon the completion of in-game achievements and more.

Transport Fever 2 is steaming onto PC and Linux in December

  • Transport Fever 2 is steaming onto PC and Linux in December

    The follow up to Transport Fever and Train Fever, you start off way back in 1850 and grow your transportation network through the ages, adopting new and evolving technology as it comes about. You can either play in a pure sandbox mode or work your way through a trio of story campaigns that explore the European, American and Asian regions.
    The game’s been given a thorough UI overhaul from Transport Fever, with new modular stations and an overhaul of the map editor and generator tools. All of this will feed into the modding community with full Steam Workshop support to share maps and saves, which can also be customised in the map editor.
    I got to go hands on with the game earlier this year, saying in our preview, “Though it’s marked as an evolution of the last Transport Fever, Urban Games might be underselling what this sequel will offer. Sure, a lot of what they’re changing in the core gameplay is based off player feedback and revising some of the existing systems to be clearer, but there’s some major features in the map editor and additions to the core gameplay as well. Even the visual and thematic upgrades alone are a big step forward. If you’re a fan of the previous games or Transport Tycoon games in general, make sure to check the timetables for when this departs for PC later this year.”

The OGRE Open-Source 3D Graphics Engine...

  • The OGRE Open-Source 3D Graphics Engine Is Working On Vulkan Support

    The OGRE open-source 3D graphics engine that is used by many games as well as different simulation / educational / interactive / visualization software is working on enabling Vulkan API support.

    OGRE supports a wide range of platforms from Linux to Windows and all major mobile platforms as well as EmScripten-enabled web browsers while the newest work for broadening the 3D high-performance graphics support is to enable use of the high performance, cross-platform Vulkan graphics API.

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