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mesa 19.3.0-rc2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Hi list,

Along with the stable mesa 19.2.3 release today, I'm pleased to announce mesa
19.3.0-rc2. There's a large number of bug fixes in this release, nouveau, intel,
radeon, radv, turnip, nir, meson, zink, iris, swr, core mesa, and android fixes
are all present here.

Developers, please have a look at the release tracker:
https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/mesa/mesa/-/milestones/5, there's plenty of bugs
that need looking at if you have some time.

Dylan


Shortlog
========

Alyssa Rosenzweig (1):
      pipe-loader: Build kmsro loader for with all kmsro targets

Bas Nieuwenhuizen (6):
      radv: Fix timeout handling in syncobj wait.
      radv: Remove _mesa_locale_init/fini calls.
      turnip: Remove _mesa_locale_init/fini calls.
      anv: Remove _mesa_locale_init/fini calls.
      radv: Fix disk_cache_get size argument.
      radv: Close all unnecessary fds in secure compile.

Daniel Schürmann (4):
      docs/relnotes/new_features.txt: Add note about ACO
      aco: fix immediate offset for spills if scratch is used
      aco: only use single-dword loads/stores for spilling
      aco: fix accidential reordering of instructions when scheduling

Dylan Baker (3):
      nir: correct use of identity check in python
      meson: Add dep_glvnd to egl deps when building with glvnd
      Bump VERSION to 19.3.0-rc2

Erik Faye-Lund (1):
      zink: emit line-width when using polygon line-mode

Ian Romanick (1):
      intel/compiler: Report the number of non-spill/fill SEND messages on vec4 too

Ilia Mirkin (2):
      gm107/ir: fix loading z offset for layered 3d image bindings
      nv50/ir: mark STORE destination inputs as used

Jan Zielinski (1):
      gallium/swr: Fix depth values for blit scenario

Jason Ekstrand (3):
      anv: Fix a potential BO handle leak
      anv/tests: Zero-initialize instances
      anv: Set the batch allocator for compute pipelines

Jordan Justen (2):
      iris: Add IRIS_DIRTY_RENDER_BUFFER state flag
      iris/gen11+: Move flush for render target change

Kenneth Graunke (1):
      iris: Fix "Force Zero RTA Index Enable" setting again

Lionel Landwerlin (3):
      intel/dev: set default num_eu_per_subslice on gen12
      mesa: check draw buffer completeness on glClearBufferfi/glClearBufferiv
      anv: Properly handle host query reset of performance queries

Mauro Rossi (1):
      android: aco: fix Lower to CSSA

Paulo Zanoni (1):
      intel/compiler: remove the operand restriction for src1 on GLK

Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (2):
      radeonsi: tell the shader disk cache what IR is used
      mesa: enable msaa in clear_with_quad if needed

Samuel Pitoiset (1):
      radv: fix compute pipeline keys when optimizations are disabled


git tag: mesa-19.3.0-rc2

Read more

Also: Mesa 19.3-RC2 Released With Fixes To RADV Vulkan, Intel Driver Fixes

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