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Proprietary Software Leftovers

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Software
  • Report Suggests Rampant Negligence In Uber Self Driving Car Fatality

    Earlier this year you might recall that a self-driving Uber in Tempe, Arizona killed a woman who was trying to cross the street with her bike outside of a crosswalk. The driver wasn't paying attention, and the car itself failed to stop for the jaywalking pedestrian. Initial reporting on the subject, most of it based on anonymous Uber sources who spoke to the paywalled news outlet The Information, strongly pushed the idea that the car's sensors worked as intended and detected the woman, but bugs in the system software failed to properly identify the woman as something to avoid:

  • Re-Licensing Sentry

    For example, this past year, we’ve had to deal with funded businesses plagiarizing or copying our work to directly compete with Sentry. This has included taking marketing content from our website, plagiarizing our documentation and framing it as their own, or straight-up copy/pasting our product visuals. Their defense? “Well, it’s free open-source, and we can do that.” These businesses are not using Sentry to improve how they develop software; they’re lifting its code and assets to build their closed-source products to compete directly with us.

  • Asus router app exposed user data to the wilds of the internet

    The web-based AsusWRT allows users to create a private WiFI network within their home network, offering a graphical user interface to make doing so a doddle. It also connects to Amazon Alexa-enabled devices.

    This all sounds fine and dandy, but vpnMentor reported that a vulnerability had been discovered by some anonymous security [researchers] and prompted it to do some digging as Asus had not been informed about the vulnerability.

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Qt and Perl

  • Qt 6.0 RC1 Takes Flight - Qt 6.0 Should Be Here By Mid-December - Phoronix

    The Qt Company has just announced Qt 6.0 Release Candidate 1 as what should be the second to the last test build ahead of the big Qt 6.0 toolkit release next month. Qt 6.0 Release Candidate 1 has the latest batch of bug/regression fixes to the Qt6 code-base. The very basic Qt 6.0 RC1 release announcement can be read on the Qt development list.

  • Porting from Qt 5 to Qt 6 using Qt5Compat library

    Porting from Qt 5 to Qt 6 has been intentionally kept easy. There has been a conscious effort throughout the development of Qt 6 to maintain as much source compatibility with Qt 5 as possible. Still, some effort is involved in porting. This short post summarizes some of the steps required when porting to Qt 6. In Qt 5 some of the classes already had existing replacements, and some classes got successors during the Qt 6 development phase. Therefore it might make sense to be able to compile your code with both the old and new Qt version. This can ensure that the amount of work where your code does not compile with either version is minimized, allowing your application or library to continue to work with Qt 5 and Qt 6. Another advantage could be that existing unit tests continue to work for most of the duration of porting, and regressions resulting from porting your code are easily distinguished from bugs introduced in Qt 6.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 88: Array of Products and Spiral Matrices

    These are some answers to the Week 88 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

  • The new rules for Perl governance

    The process of adopting a new governance model for the Perl project appears to be reaching an end; the new model is designed to look a lot like the one adopted by the Python project

qBittorrent 4.3.1 Released, How to Install in Ubuntu via PPA

The first update for qBittorrent 4.3 series was released today with some new features, bug-fixes, and web UI changes. Read more

Android Leftovers

The Performance Impact To POWER9's Eager L1d Cache Flushing Fix

Last week a new vulnerability was made public for IBM POWER9 processors resulting in a mitigation of the processor's L1 data cache needing to be flushed between privilege boundaries. Due to the possibility of local users being able to obtain data from the L1 cache improperly when this CVE is paired with other side channels, the Linux kernel for POWER9 hardware is flushing the L1d on entering the kernel and on user accesses. Here are some preliminary benchmarks looking at how this security change impacts the overall system performance. All the latest Linux kernel stable series are now patched with the new POWER9 behavior for the L1 data cache flushing when crossing privilege boundaries. As outlined already, that L1d flushing behavior is the default but can be disabled with new "no_entry_flush" and "no_uaccess_flush" kernel options to maintain the prior behavior of not flushing. Read more