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SMARC module runs Linux on i.MX8X

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Android
Linux
OSS

Advantech’s “ROM-5620” SMARC 2.0 module runs Linux or Android on a dual- or quad-core i.MX8X and offers 2GB LPDDR4, 16GB eMMC, and optional industrial temperature support.

While covering Advantech’s newly announced, i.MX8M based ROM-5720 SMARC 2.0 module and i.MX8 QuadMax based ROM-7720 Qseven module, we noticed a product page for an i.MX8X-based ROM-5620 SMARC 2.0 module marked as “new.” Presumably, the module is similarly available with three months of free Timesys’ Vigiles security service, which Advantech said would be available to all its customers for NXP’s i.MX8 family. The module is available with open source Linux and Android BSPs, which include test utilities, hardware design utilities, and reference drivers.

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