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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux has some advantages, but is more complicated than Windows
  • Top Server Monitoring Vendors

    Nagios is recognized as the top solution to monitor servers in a variety of different ways. Server monitoring is made easy in Nagios because of the flexibility to monitor your servers with and without agents. With more than 3,500 different add-ons available to monitor your servers, the community at the Nagios Exchange leaves nothing to chance.

  • Technical Leadership Paths

    My favorite projects to work on are high impact and difficult to execute even if there not deeply technical. In fact, I've found that my most impactful projects tend to only have a small technical component. Instead, the real value tends to come from spanning a few different technical areas, tackling some cultural change, or taking time to deeply understand the problem before throwing a solution at it. Framing these projects as "strategic" help me put my thumb on the type of work I like doing.

    Keavy also calls out strike teams as a valuable way for ICs to work on high impact projects without moving into management. In my last three years at Mozilla, I've been fortunate to be a part of several strike teams and upon reflection I find that these are the projects I'm most proud of.

  • Ubuntu at Kubecon Americas 2019, San Diego

    The Kubecon world tour is coming to its last stop of the year for Kubecon Americas 2019 in San Diego… and the Canonical / Ubuntu team will be present with Kubernetes in all its flavours from public cloud to private cloud, from powerful Intel Cores to ARM chipset, from single-node development machines to large clusters.

  • Come See Us at KubeCon San Diego!

    We’ve compiled all of the information you need to find us at KubeCon San Diego, November 18 through 21. Talks by Red Hatters coming up at this giant event will focus on topics like KubeVirt, CRI-O, Jaeger, Tekton, Thanos and other open source Kubernetes projects. 

  • People of WordPress: Kim Parsell

    In order to understand how highly valued the WordPress community was to Kim Parsell, you have to know a bit about her environment.

    Kim was a middle-aged woman who lived off a dirt road, on top of a hill, in Southern rural Ohio. She was often by herself, taking care of the property with only a few neighbors up and down the road.

    She received internet access from towers that broadcast wireless signals, similar to cell phones but at lower speeds.

  • Microsoft Taps Igel to Develop First Linux Thin Client for WVD
  • How Open Source Software Is Defining the Future of Mobile Connectivity

    Mobile operators face intense pressure to deliver more data, faster connectivity, better coverage and more functionality to end users who are (unfortunately) more demanding than ever. Increasingly, these end users will not be people as we know them but rather Internet of Things (IoT) devices. IDC has projected that by 2025, 60% of the world’s data will be generated by enterprises, double its level in 2017, largely due to the growth in connected devices, sensors, automation and related equipment.

  • LG open-sources Auptimizer, a tool for optimizing AI models

    Despite the proliferation of open source tools like Databricks’ AutoML Toolkit, Salesforce’s TransfogrifAI, and IBM’s Watson Studio AutoAI, tuning machine learning algorithms at scale remains a challenge. Finding the right hyperparameters — variables in the algorithms that help control the overall model’s performance — often involves time-consuming ancillary tasks like job-scheduling and tracking parameters and their effects. That’s why scientists at LG’s Advanced AI division developed Auptimizer, an open source hyperparameter optimization framework intended to help with AI model tweaking and bookkeeping.

  • Google Open Sources its Cardboard VR Platform

    More than 15 million Cardboard were sold worldwide, says Google, with over 160 million Cardboard-enabled app downloads. According to Google, the Cardboard contributed to the success of the YouTube Virtual Reality channel and made possible the creation of the education-focused Expeditions app. Google also released precise schematics and assembly instructions that enabled the creation of a number of variations of the original design which were available for as little as $5. Now, Google is trying to replicate this schema by open-sourcing the whole platform to inject new life in it.

  • The real number of open source developers [Ed: Mac Asay or Microsoft is a liar. There's history to this lie from him (calling Microsoft "biggest Open Source company", based on GitHub alone (it's Microsoft's own site!). Perpetuates still... this lie that only what Microsoft controls counts as FOSS. That's like judging the world's dietary preferences/nutrition by India alone because there are "many people there..."]

    I’m not suggesting some nefarious intent to deceive. GitHub folks aren’t like that. But by conflating accounts with developers, GitHub isn’t helping us get any closer to accurate data on the developer population. More importantly, we don’t need to artificially inflate developer numbers in order to establish their importance.

  • Open Source Needs Better Design: Cynthia Sanchez

    Cynthia Sanchez is the creator of eOS, design system project. The goal of the project is to create a consistent and modern design principle for open source projects.

  • How to obscure open ports with knockd
  • How to install XFCE or Xubuntu desktop environment on a computer running Ubuntu Linux
  • Hackaday Podcast 043: Ploopy, Castlevania Cube-Scroller, Projection Map Your Face, And Smoosh Those 3D Prints

    Before you even ask, it’s an open source trackball and you’re gonna like it. Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams get down to brass tacks on this week’s hacks. From laying down fatter 3D printer extrusion and tricking your stick welder, to recursive Nintendos and cubic Castlevania, this week’s episode is packed with hacks you ought not miss.

  • 2019-11-08 | Linux Headlines

    openSUSE releases the results of the poll for its new name, the FSF awards its "Respects Your Freedom" certificate to two new mainboards, Amazon announces savings plans, Swift gets a new open-source project, and Golang turns 10.

More in Tux Machines

postmarketOS in 2020-02

Long time readers may ask themselves: what's with the strange title? Where's the traditional "xyz days of postmarketOS" post? Truth is, that this is a low-key update post, one that is rather "rushed out" in a few hours instead of spending a whole week on adding all the fancy photos and gifs webm animations and so on. Consider this the minimal effort of making the project not look dead on the homepage, while not getting too distracted from the deep development lands that our minds are sunken into. We are on track with our project direction 2020 plans. In a nutshell, we will create a stable releases of postmarketOS based on Alpine stable, while still having the development channel based on Alpine edge. Furthermore, the status of supported devices will become clearer. The PinePhone, possibly the Librem 5 and few more will be labeled as officially supported in their deviceinfo and in the wiki. postmarketOS should be usable as daily driver on these. All other devices will be categorized further, depending on active maintainer count and what is working. Think of it like the AUR: still useful, but sometimes broken and you need to know what you are doing when using these. The devices will get split into their own git repository, so one can use the device packages with both the "edge" and "latest" (stable!) channel of all other packages. @ollieparanoid and @Minecrell are evolving pmbootstrap as needed. Read more

Android Leftovers

KDE: Cutelyst 2.10.0 and SimpleMail 2, Okular Examined, FOSDEM & Plasma Mobile Sprint

  • Cutelyst 2.10.0 and SimpleMail v2 released!

    Cutelyst the C++/Qt Web framework and SimpleMailQt just got new releases. Cutelyst received many important bugfixes and if you are compiling it with View::Email it also requires SimpleMail 2, the latter got an Async API which is on production for a few months, allowing for a non-blocking send mail experience.

  • Okular is an open source universal document viewer for Windows, Linux and macOS

    Wouldn't it be nice if you had one program to view them all? That's exactly what Okular does. It's an open source universal document viewer for Windows, Linux and macOS. The program is made by KDE, a name Linux users should be familiar with, among other creations they are the ones behind the popular Kubuntu (Ubuntu + KDE Software) distro. Let's begin touring the interface. The sidepanel on the left can be used to jump to the Contents, Thumbnails, Reviews and Bookmarks sections. Select one of the options and the list of corresponding items are displayed in the panel to the right of the sidebar. The Contents option lists each section/chapter in a document, along with the sub-items, page numbers, etc. The Thumbnail mode pane displays a preview of each page in the document, you can scroll through it and click to go to the selected page. The Reviews pane contain the annotations that have been made on the document. If you don't have any, you can add some by hitting the F6 key or from the Tools menu > Review. Bookmarks are custom links that you have added, i.e., if you bookmark a page it will be displayed in the side-panel for future reference. Hit Ctrl + B to bookmark a page.

  • FOSDEM & Plasma Mobile Sprint

    Last week I decided to take KDE Itinerary for a test tour. Between the train rides there was also time for some KDE stuff. FOSDEM After writing an exam on Friday afternoon I took a train to Frankfurt. I did so not to enjoy the beautiful scenery of the area around Frankfurt central station at night but to be able to catch an early train towards Bruxelles for my first time at FOSDEM. It has been a great experience to meet so many people interested in what KDE does at the KDE booth. It also was awesome to meet all the folks that are working hard on making Linux on the phone become a thing.

Want to be an innovative company? Adopt enterprise open source

Nearly all IT professionals (95%) agree that enterprise open source is important, with 75% of professionals citing it as "extremely important," a Red Hat report found. Enterprise open source isn't just a trend, but a growing movement, as 77% of respondents expect their organizations to increase open source use in the next 12 months. "Historically, open source was seen [mainly] in web infrastructure," said Gordon Haff, Red Hat technology evangelist. "What you're seeing today is how open source is becoming a space where companies and individuals come together to collaborate in new areas of technology." Read more