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Ubuntu and Debian: Eoan Ermine and Latest From Planet Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • What’s New in Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine

    Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine has been released announced officially by canonical, this release introduces numerous new features, updated apps and components, and much more.

    Ubuntu 19.10 release includes embedded Nvidia proprietary drivers in the ISO image to improve the performance, smoothness, and frame rates in games and experimental ZFS file system for root, which is implemented in the installer.

    as well as all the latest Open Source software, including GNOME 3.34 as default desktop environment with new light and dark variants of the Yaru theme, the ability to run Xwayland apps as root/sudo , LibreOffice 6.3 office suite, Mozilla Firefox 69 web browser, and many others.

  • Python dataclasses and typing

    I'm going to preach the wonders of Python dataclasses, but for reasons of interested to those who have already gone down the delightful rabbit-hole of typed Python. So let me start with a quick plug for mypy if you haven't heard about it.

    (Warning: this is going to be a bit long.)

  • Hideki Yamane: fontforge package update

    I've uploaded fontforge package into experimental. It needs huge changes in debian packaging.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: Debian Activities for October 2019

    Here’s my (first) monthly update about the activities I’ve done in Debian this October.

More in Tux Machines

Qt for MCUs 1.0 is now available

Qt for MCUs enables creation of fluid graphical user interfaces (GUI) with a low memory footprint on displays powered by microcontrollers (MCU). It is a complete graphics toolkit with everything needed to design, develop, and deploy GUIs on MCUs. It enables a unified technology approach for an entire product line to create a consistent and branded end user experience. Watch the Qt for MCUs video showcasing different use cases. Qt for MCUs 1.0 has already been adopted by lead customers in Japan, Europe and the US, who have started developing their next generation product. This release has been tested on microcontrollers from NXP, Renesas and STMicroelectronics. The software release contains Platform Adaptations for NXP i.MX RT1050 and STM32F769i as the default Deployment Platforms. Platform Adaptations for several other NXP and STM32 microcontrollers as well as the Renesas RH850 microcontroller are available as separate Deployment Platform Packages. On request, Qt Professional Services can provide new Platform Adaptions for additional microcontrollers. Read more

Replicant needs your help to liberate Android in 2020

Mobile devices such as phones and tablets are becoming an increasingly important part in our computing, hence they are particularly subject to freedom and security concerns. These devices aren't simply "phones" or "tablets." They are full computers with powerful hardware, running complete operating systems that allow for updates, software changes, and installable applications. This makes it feasible to run free software on them. Thus, it is possible to choose a device that runs a free bootloader and free mobile operating system -- Replicant -- as well as fully free apps for the user. You can read more about privacy and security on mobile phones and the solutions that Replicant offers, as well as learn some valuable lessons on how better to protect your freedom on mobile devices on the Replicant Web site. Replicant is currently steered by a team of three people: Fil Bergamo, Joonas Kylmälä (Putti), and myself. At the beginning of this year, we successfully applied for funding from a program from the European Union called Next Generation Internet. We also received a sizeable donation from Handshake, which allowed us to make some significant investments. Read more

today's howtos

CVE patching is not making your Linux secure

Would you like to enhance your Linux security? Do you wonder what factors should be considered when evaluating your open source security from both – the infrastructure and the application perspectives? Are you keen to learn the Ubuntu security team approach? I’ve learned that CVE patching is indeed an important puzzle, but without a structured approach, professional tools and well-defined processes in place, your Linux environment will not be secure. What do Linux security experts say? I got inspired by all these questions during the Open Source Security Summit, which was followed by the Linux Security Summit. I really enjoyed a week full of keynotes, workshops and meaningful conversations. So much so that, in my notebook, I noted down some really good quotes about the Linux security. For instance, Kelly Hammond from Intel opened her keynote by saying that “security is like doing the laundry or the dishes – it’s never done”. Linux security is more complicated than fixing CVEs Fixing CVEs is a continuous job that all Linux security teams focus on. In his keynote, Greg Kroah-Hartman from the Linux Foundation looked at this problem from the kernel perspective. In his exact words “CVEs mean nothing for the kernel” because very few CVEs are ever going to be assigned for the kernel. A stable Linux kernel receives 22-25 patches every day without any CVE process involved. So Greg’s position on the Linux security comes down to always using the latest stable kernel and not worrying about CVEs. Read more Also: Security updates for Tuesday