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Games: Valve, BorderDoom, BlooM, The Sapling, Red Eclipse 2, Crash World, Cyberpunk Bar Sim and The Farlanders

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Gaming
  • Valve has an Armistice Sale and Singles Day sale on Steam with some good Linux games cheap

    Yet another chance to grab a game or two from your wishlist perhaps? The Armistice Sale on Steam supports the War Child UK charity and there's also a Singles Day sale.

    For the Armistice Sale, Valve are promoting games with non-violent gameplay (or they got an update for the sale) to support children affected by the world’s deadliest conflicts.

  • BorderDoom adds a little Borderlands flavour to classic Doom

    Always on the lookout for the new and interesting, BorderDoom came across the GOL news-desk recently adding a little Borderlands flavour to Doom.

    It's quite a basic mod, once that would likely work well with the many others out there. The basic idea of it is to add in weapons with random properties like damage, number of bullets fired, firing speed and so on, plus shields that recharge and enemies that have levels to give you more of a challenge.

  • BlooM brings together the classics Doom and Blood

    Another quality mashup here, with BlooM merging together elements from both Doom and Blood into something quite different. The team behind it recently put up a fresh demo while they work on the full release which includes new maps, enemies, music and more.

  • Design your own plants and animals in the casual sim The Sapling

    Releasing with Linux support in December, The Sapling looks like a nice casual sim where you design your own plants and animals.

    Probably one of the most difficult types of games to get right, many have attempted some sort of evolution sim and it's always great to see more.

  • Red Eclipse 2 is a revamp of the classic free arena shooter coming to Steam

    I will admit this is quite a surprise, Red Eclipse is a first-person shooter I haven't seen mentioned in a long time and it seems they're closing in on a big revamped release with Red Eclipse 2.

    A classic free and open source shooter, Red Eclipse hasn't seen a released update since 1.6 back in December of 2017. Two years later, they're launching the massive upgrade for it free on Steam. Not a simple update either, they've completely changed the rendering engine to bring in Tesseract so they can support more advanced graphical features.

  • Deliver pizzas, upgrade your car and smash into everything in Crash World

    Crash World is an upcoming comedy pizza delivery game with some really silly physics and you can try an early demo right now.

    Releasing on Steam next year, it's a pretty wacky game. Bouncy physics, terrible vehicle handling, a car you can upgrade and an ever-changing city should provide plenty of amusement. This isn't some GTA-style open-world game though, it's mission-based but going off-mission is something that will happen often. It did to me anyway, I just couldn't help myself.

  • Cyberpunk Bar Sim fully funded on Kickstarter and coming to Linux

    Currently crowdfunding (successfully!) with a few days left, Cyberpunk Bar Sim takes elements inspired by both Game Dev Tycoon and VA-11 Hall-A to create a new mix of cyberpunk bar ownership.

    Starting off with nothing but a small dive bar with five stools, a counter-top and a handful of customers you will need to grow the business and expand your reach. Eventually you will pull in regulars, who will get chatty and tell you their story.

  • Build a busy city on Mars in The Farlanders, an in-development city-builder with a free web demo

    Currently in development and quite early on, The Farlanders is a tile-based city-builder set on the red planet Mars. Created by developer Angry Kid, the same behind Undervault a free roguelike dungeon crawler.

    Even though it's not finished, it's starting to really look good and it's already engrossing enough for me to recommend taking a look at it if you're in the mood for a city-builder that's a little different to the rest.

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