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Gnome: First Shortwave Beta

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GNOME

Earlier this year I announced Shortwave, the successor of Gradio. Now, almost 11 months later, I’m proud to announce the first public beta of Shortwave!

Shortwave is an internet radio player that lets you search for stations, listen to them and record songs automatically.

When a station is being played, everything gets automatically recorded in the background. You hear a song you like? No problem, you can save the song afterwards and play it with your favorite music player. Songs are automatically detected based on the stream metadata.

Read more

Aldo: Shortwave Enters Beta As New GNOME Internet Radio Player

More on Shortwave

  • Shortwave Internet Radio Player For Linux Has Its First Beta Release

    Shortwave, the successor of Gradio, had it first beta release over the weekend. This is a GTK Internet radio player written in Rust, which uses radio-browser.info as its radio stations database.

    Background: The Gradio developer wanted to rewrite Gradio using Rust, but later started a completely new project called Shortwave. There will be no major Gradio releases, but don't worry as Shortwave will include all important Gradio features and more.

    Using Shortwave you can search for Internet radio stations, listen to them, automatically record songs, and even stream to Google Cast-enabled (Chromecast) devices.

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