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Database of 200+ smartphones that can run Linux (unofficially)

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GNU
Linux
Gadgets

The vast majority of smartphones in the world ship with some version of Google’s Android operating system. And most of them are only supported by their manufacturers for a few years.

Have a phone that’s 3-4 years old? Then you’re probably not getting any Android updates anymore. No more security patches. No new features.

Of course, some folks can run custom ROMs such as LineageOS, which lets you install updates indefinitely… but want to break out of Android altogether? There are a handful of other GNU/Linux-based operating systems including Ubuntu Touch, postmarketOS, and Maemo Leste that are designed to, among other things, help give your phone a longer lifespan.

One tricky thing can be figuring out which phones are supported. That’s where a new Can My Phone Run Linux database from TuxPhones comes in.

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Linux Capable Smarphones Database Launched with over 200 Models

  • Linux Capable Smarphones Database Launched with over 200 Models

    Recently there have been companies working on smartphones that ship with Linux with Purism Librem 5 and Pine64 PinePhone being the most popular. But it has been possible to install Linux on various other (Android) phones thanks to projects like PostMarketOS or UBports’ Ubuntu Touch.

    But to make it easier to find out whether your phone is supported, the guy(s) at Tuxphones have created a database of phones that can run Linux.

Here’s a list of 200+ smartphones that can run Linux distros

  • Here’s a list of 200+ smartphones that can run Linux distributions

    A Linux kernel is a core element of Android but despite this, Android cannot be called a Linux distribution because it lacks a GNU interface typical of a Linux distro. Android and Linux apps are not exchangeable because of different runtime systems and libraries. But with the efforts of some brilliant developers, you can actually run a legit Linux distribution on your smartphone which traditionally runs Android. The steps are as simple as installing a custom ROM and this is especially helpful if you have an aging smartphone that isn’t likely to get much – or even worse any – support.

    If you’re looking to experience something other than Android – more specifically, Linux – on a smartphone, there are several touch-based Linux distros like Ubuntu Touch, postmarketOS, and Maemo Leste. You can head over to Can My Phone Run Linux, a database set up by TuxPhones and type your phone’s name in the search bar to find a list of Linux distributions that are supported by your phone.

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