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Development and Documentation at Mozilla, SUSE, R, Vim an More

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  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 68

    The “Omniscient” Browser Toolbox will be enabled by default in the coming days

  • The Brains Behind the Books – Part VII: Alexandra Settle

    The content of this article has been contributed by Alexandra Settle, Technical Writer at the SUSE Documentation Team.

    It is part of a series of articles focusing on SUSE Documentation and the great minds that create the manuals, guides, quick starts, and many more helpful documents.

  • The 20 Best R Machine Learning Packages in 2019

    Almost all novice data scientists and machine learning developers are being confused about picking a programming language. They always ask which programming language will be best for their machine learning and data science project. Either we will go for python, R, or MatLab. Well, the choice of a programming language depends on developers’ preference and system requirements. Among other programming languages, R is one of the most potential and splendid programming languages that have several R machine learning packages for both ML, AI, and data science projects.

    [...]

    R is an open-source language so people can contribute from anywhere in the world. You can use a Black Box in your code, which is written by someone else. In R, this Black Box is refereed to as a package. The package is nothing but a pre-written code that can be used repeatedly by anyone. Below, we are showcasing the top 20 best R machine learning packages.

  • 8 Excellent Free Books to Learn Vim

    Vim is an open source configurable and powerful text editor. It’s an improved version of the vi editor, with development dating back to 1976. This software can be used to write any kind of text.

    Vim sports a minimalistic interface to help the writer focus on the task at hand. It’s popular among developers given that it’s inherently modal (you go into command modes where you cannot edit), efficient, extensible, fast, and terminal friendly.

    When getting started with Vim, users face a steep learning curve. It’s true the software is simple. It’s simple in the sense that its minimal interface focuses the user on their main task. But Vim is very powerful.

  • RelStorage 3.0

    We're happy to announce the release of RelStorage 3.0, the relational storage engine for ZODB. Compared to RelStorage 2, highlights include a 30% reduction in memory usage, and up to 98% faster performance! (Ok, yes, that's from one specific benchmark and not everything is 98% faster, but improved performance was a major goal.)

    RelStorage 3.0 is a major release of RelStorage with a focus on performance and scalability. It's the result of a concentrated development effort spanning six months, with each pre-release being in production usage with large databases.

  • Introduction to ZODB Data Storage

    ZODB is a powerful native object database for Python, widely known for its use in the Zope web framework and the Plone content management system. By enabling transparent object graph persistence with no need to predefine schemas, ZODB enables extremely flexible application development. With pluggable storage engines such as FileStorage, ZEO, and RelStorage, it also provides flexible ways to store data.

    [...]

    In addition, ZODB provides a transactional view of these objects with snapshot isolation. Any given connection to the database sees a consistent view of all the objects in the database (whether it reads or writes to any particular object or not) as-of the moment it began. When adding or updating objects, no changes are published and made visible to other connections until the writing connection commits its transaction, at which point either all the changes are made visible or none of them are. Existing connections that continue reading (or even writing!) will still not see those changes; they're "stuck" at the snapshot view of the objects they started with. (The ability for readers to continue to be able to retrieve old data that's been replaced in newer transactions is known as multi-version concurrency control, or MVCC.)

    Many connections may be reading and writing to the database at once. ZODB uses optimistic concurrency control. Readers don't block other readers or writers, and writers are allowed to proceed as if they were the only one making changes right up until they commit. Writes are defined to occur in a strict order. If a writer discovers that an earlier transaction had modified objects that it too wants to modify, a conflict occurs. Instead of just rolling back the writing transaction and forcing it to start over, taking the modified object into account, ZODB gives the application the chance to resolve the conflict using a three-way merge between the object as it existed when the transaction began, the object that the connection wants to commit, and the object that was committed by the other writer. Only if it cannot do so is the transaction rolled back.

Download the new Python pip cheat sheet

  • Download the new Python pip cheat sheet

    In addition to installing packages, pip can also be used to build wheels. Wheels are a special file format that is optimized to install without any processing. This makes wheels useful for installing the same distribution in many different environments, e.g., on different machines or in different virtual environments in a single machine.
    pip can also record the packages installed in a virtual environment in a text file, which can be transferred to reproduce the identical virtual environment. The text file can be emailed, sent over a chat service, or, most commonly, checked into version control.

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