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Games: Resolutiion, Flax Engine, Sales

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Gaming
  • Explore a fractured future in 'Resolutiion', a ridiculously stylish Zeldaesque action-adventure

    Step into the role of Valor, an old killer escorting a curious AI to infiltrate a terrorist network in the dark cyberpunk world of Resolutiion, which seems to be shaping up beautifully with a new trailer.

    Loaded with gorgeous pixel art, dirty jokes, awesome tunes and hours of punishing combat, Resolutiion will be wrapped up in some exploration they say will be rewarding thanks to the layered storytelling.

  • Game dev: Flax Engine is adding Linux support in an upcoming update

    Flax Engine, another game engine that supports Vulkan is going cross-platform with an upcoming release adding in Linux support.

    In a fresh blog post today, the team noted that Linux support is coming and development builds of Flax are already running great on Ubuntu and cloud-based solutions. This comes with their Vulkan rendering engine and all core engine features working.

  • Weekend deals and free stuff, here's what is currently hot for Linux gamers

    Hello Friday, welcome back into our lives. Here's a look at what you can pick up cheap across this weekend and what's free.

    First up, Company of Heroes 2 is free to pick up on Steam and keep forever! This deal will last until Sunday, November 17 at 6PM UTC. Relic Entertainment are also giving out the Victory At Stalingrad DLC as a free extra if you join their newsletter. This could mean there's a new one on the way. It has a Linux port from Feral Interactive and it's a huge amount of fun.

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