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Fedora, Slackware and OpenSUSE Tumbleweed

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Linux
  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-46

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Fedora 29 will reach end of life on 26 November. Elections voting begins next week. Candidates must submit their interviews before the deadline or they will not be on the ballot.

  • Slackware November ’19 release of OpenJDK 8

    Today, icedtea-3.14.0 was released. IcedTea is a software build framework which allows easy compilation of OpenJDK.

    The new IcedTea release will build you the latest Java8:  OpenJDK 8u232_b09. This release syncs the OpenJDK support in IcedTea to the official October 2019 security fixes that Oracle released for Java. The release announcement in the mailing list for distro packagers has details about all the security issues and vulnerabilities that are addressed.

    I have built Slackware packages for the new Java 8 Update 232 and uploaded them already. Please upgrade at your earliest convenience. Java is still widespread which makes it a popular target for vulnerability attacks.

  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/46

    This has been a busy week, with 5 successfully tested snapshots delivered to you, the users (1107, 1109, 1110, 1111 and 1112).

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Heroku Review apps available for Treeherder

In bug 1566207 I added support for Heroku Review Apps (link to official docs). This feature allows creating a full Treeherder deployment (backend, frontend and data ingestion pipeline) for a pull request. This gives Treeherder engineers the ability to have their own deployment without having to compete over the Treeherder prototype app (a shared deployment). This is important as the number of engineers and contributors increases. Once created you get a complete Heroku environment with add-ons and workers configured and the deployment for it. Looking back, there are few new features that came out of the work, however, Heroku Review apps are not used as widely as I would have hoped for. Read more

Linux-driven RISC-V core to debut on an NXP i.MX SoC

The OpenHW Group unveiled a Linux-driven “CORE-V Chassis” eval SoC due for tape-out in 2H 2020 based on an NXP i.MX SoC, but featuring its RISC-V-and PULP-based 64-bit, 1.5GHz CV64A CPU and 32-bit CV32E cores. Meanwhile, Think Silicon demonstrated a RISC-V-based NEOX|V GPU. A not-for-profit, open source RISC-V initiative called the OpenHW Group that launched in June has announced that it plans to tape out a Linux-friendly CORE-V Chassis evaluation SoC in the second half of 2020 built around its 64-bit CV64A CPU core and 32-bit CV32E coprocessor. The RISC-V based cores will be integrated into an undefined, NXP i.MX heterogeneous, multi-core SoC design. The SoC was announced at this week’s RISC-V Summit in San Jose, Calif., where Think Silicon also demo’d an early version of a RISC-V-based NEOX|V GPU (see farther below). The open source CV64A CPU core and 32-bit CV32E are based on RISC-V architecture PULP Platform cores developed by the University of ETH Zurich. The 64-bit CV64A core is based on ETH Zurich’s Ariane implementation of its RV64GC RISC-V core IP. RV64GC is also used by many other RISC-V projects, including SiFive’s U54. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers