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Intel: oneAPI and IWD 1.1

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  • Intel Releases oneAPI Base Toolkit Beta For Performance-Focused, Cross-Device Software

    The oneAPI Base Toolkit is for writing code that runs across CPUs, GPUs, and FPGAs among other possible accelerators. The primary programming language is their Data Parallel C++ and SYCL fits into the toolchain as well. OpenMP and MPI are supported with the oneAPI HPC toolkit. While other components include the oneAPI IoT Toolkit for developing IoT software and the oneAPI rendering toolkit for ray-tracing and visual rendering. The different toolkits can be found here.

  • IWD 1.1 Released For Intel's Linux Wireless Daemon

    IWD 1.0 stabilized this wireless daemon's interfaces and made it ready for embedded and desktop use-cases as an alternative to the likes of WPA-Supplicant. With IWD 1.1 are just a few changes amounting to some basic fixes while the new feature is radio resource management.

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