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Intel: BIOS, Mesa and Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Intel To Drop Very Old Drivers/BIOS From Their Site, But The Linux Impact To Be Minimal

    Making waves today is that Intel will be removing very old BIOS and driver downloads from their site on or after 22 November. Though these software downloads for the products in question are around ~20 years old so the real-world impact should be small plus with Linux drivers being in the mainline kernel, all you'd really be losing out on are BIOS updates that themselves haven't seen updates in years.

    Intel is said to be removing old drivers and BIOS from their original Pentium era product offerings later in the week. Intel hasn't provided an exact list of all the products affected, but they are all close to 20 years old and beyond. Besides vintage hobbyists and those relying upon the outdated hardware still in niche use-cases, there shouldn't be much real impact. This Reddit thread has additional details on some of the affected products and unofficial mirrors of the files now that the removal of the files are imminent.

  • Intel's Vulkan Driver To Lower CPU Overhead With Mesa 20.0

    A patch series was merged today for the in-development Mesa 20.0 to further lower the CPU overhead of Intel's open-source Vulkan driver.

    Lead Intel "ANV" driver developer Jason Ekstrand merged the 15 commits focused on CPU overhead reductions. These reductions come after analyzing traces from rapid bind-and-draw benchmarks and seeing that the binding tables and push constants were in the hottest of hot paths.

  • Intel's oneAPI / DPC++ / SYCL Will Run Atop NVIDIA GPUs With Open-Source Layer

    With yesterday's much anticipated Intel oneAPI beta being built around open-source standards like SYCL, the "cross-device" support can at least in theory extend beyond just Intel platforms. Codeplay is already showing that's possible with a to-be-open-source layer that will allow oneAPI and SYCL / Data Parallel C++ to run atop NVIDIA GPUs via CUDA.

    Codeplay, which is already known for their several Vulkan / SYCL / SPIR-V initiatives, is working on this layer to run oneAPI / DPC++ / SYCL codes atop NVIDIA hardware while still leveraging NVIDIA's CUDA drivers. You could think of it akin as DXVK or VKD3D that map Direct3D 11 to Vulkan but this is about allowing Intel-focused code to run on NVIDIA's drivers. Or similarly, AMD's Radeon ROCm that allows some CUDA codes to be compiled for execution on AMD hardware.

  • Mini Type 10 dev board supports extended mini-PCIe I/O modules

    Acromag’s rugged “ACEX4041” Mini-ITX carrier is equipped with a Linux-friendly, Apollo Lake based COM Express Mini Type 10 module plus 4x mini-PCIe based “AcroPack” slots that support 25+ I/O modules.

    Acromag announced a Mini-ITX form-factor carrier board for COM Express Mini Type 10 modules sold in three configurations: barebones (ACEX4041); equipped with an Intel Apollo Lake Mini Type 10 module (ACEX4041-2000); or a Development Lab System sold with the Apollo Lake module and 1TB storage (DLS4041-2110). The ACEX4041 is equipped with 4x AcroPack I/O slots that support third-party mini-PCIe cards but are designed primarily to load one of Acromag’s 25+ AcroPack modules.

  • Some FUJITSU FUTRO Thin Clients are Powered by Intel Gemini Lake Refresh SoC’s

    Six new Intel Gemini Lake Refresh processors were just announced a couple of weeks ago, and some of the first systems to feature the processor are part of FUJTISU Thin Client FUTRO family.

  • Gemini Lake based Lattepanda Delta SBC relaunches for $188

    DFRobot’s previously Kickstartered, Ubuntu-ready LattePanda Delta SBC has relaunched for $188 with a quad-core Gemini Lake SoC. The Intel Core-based Lattepanda Alpha is already available starting at $379 for a model that recently switched from a 7th Gen to an 8th Gen Amber Lake-Y CPU.

    Back in Dec. 2017, DFRobot’s LattePanda project went to Kickstarter to launch a community-backed LattePanda Alpha SBC with a 7th Gen Kaby Lake Intel Core m3-7Y30 and an almost identical LattePanda Delta with a Celeron N4100 from the “Gemini Lake” follow-on to Apollo Lake. Both boards shipped to backers late, with the Alpha ARRIVING in late 2018 and the Delta being fulfilled this spring. The Alpha relaunched for public sales in January, and now the Delta is available.

Schedutil Frequency Invariance Revised

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