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Fedora and Red Hat: release-monitoring, Command Line Heroes, OpenShift Hive, Red Hat Software Collections

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  • Stories from the amazing world of release-monitoring.org #8

    The evening wind was cold, but I protected myself by the fire spell. It was nice to sit outside and look at the whole release-monitoring.org realm in the sunset. One could see the beauty behind all this hard work and it’s ignites a nice feeling inside one’s heart. Lately I didn’t have much time to appreciate this beauty. To be honest I didn’t have much time to work on this realm in the last few months. But still some work was done even here.

    I heard the footsteps behind me. “Traveler, it’s nice to see you again. Do you want to join me?” Footsteps stopped beside me and my companion was looking at the sunset with me. “I suppose you are here to hear about the news from this world. I assure you there are many things I want to share with you. Just listen…”

  • Command Line Heroes takes Bash from script to screen

    Creating visuals for stories about programming language isn’t always straightforward. The artwork for the first few episodes of this season was inspired by origins and functions. But for Episode 6, Heroes in a Bash Shell, we decided to take a more abstract approach.

    Shells, particularly the Bash shell, are widely used large-scale IT environments. Shell scripting allows us to automate repetitive tasks and do much more with standalone utilities. Our graphic designer, Karen Crowson, and animator, Drew Carrow, share how that reality, mixed in with some pun-related imagery, provided the frame for the Heroes in a Bash Shell artwork.

  • OpenShift Hive: Cluster-as-a-Service

    Red Hat OpenShift has enabled enterprise developers to utilize a fast feedback loop during the development phase of platforms and applications. The idea of ‘as-a-service’ has arisen from the ability of cloud providers to offer an on demand capability to consume services and products. This increased flexibility for organisations can further ease the development path to production.

    Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift unlocks organisations to achieve freedom with platforms of choice on a number of cloud providers without lock-in as workloads are abstracted from vendor specific constructs. Kubernetes, and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, provide the ability to run operators, where operators can act as an organisation’s very own consumable on demand service whilst providing a unique user experience to its intended audience.

    As a developer having a personal on demand environment was once one of the reasons for the rise of “shadow IT”. Organisations have since moved from the days of having to build servers for additional workloads through the use of new models of IT services thanks to virtualisation, PaaS and public/private cloud in an effort to adopt the on-demand/as-a-service utopia and enable their consumers to have the freedom to develop and produce strong value proposition products in today’s competitive market.

    OpenShift has become the platform of choice for many organisations. However, this can mean developers are somewhat restricted in consuming PaaS environment, due to greater process and management surrounding the environment, in accordance with internal IT regulations. OpenShift Hive is an operator which enables operations teams to easily provision new PaaS environments for developers improving productivity and reducing process burden due to internal IT regulations. Hive can do this in a true DevOps fashion while still adhering to an organization’s regulations and security standards.

  • Red Hat Software Collections 3.4 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 9 Beta now available

    The latest versions of Red Hat Software Collections and Red Hat Developer Toolset are available now in beta. Red Hat Software Collections 3.4 delivers the latest stable versions of many popular open source runtime languages and databases natively to the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform. These components are supported for up to five years, helping to enable a more consistent, efficient, and reliable developer experience.

  • What is a community of practice in an open organization?

    In other words, people in open organizations often define their roles, responsibilities, and affiliations through shared interests and passions—not title, role, or position on an organizational chart.

    That means organizational leaders will find themselves invested in building communities inside their organizations, connecting like-minded people with one another to accelerate business objectives.

    For this reason, communities of practice can be a useful component of open organizations. In this three-part series, I'll explain what communities of practice are, why they are beneficial to an organization, and how you can start a community of practice.

More in Tux Machines

Stable kernels 5.4.2, 5.3.15, 4.19.88, 4.14.158, 4.9.206, and 4.4.206

  • Linux 5.4.2
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.4.2 kernel. All users of the 5.4 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.4.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.4.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
  • Linux 5.3.15
  • Linux 4.19.88
  • Linux 4.14.158
  • Linux 4.9.206
  • Linux 4.4.206

Graphics: Mir, X.Org, Gallium3D, GPUOpen, Mesa, Lima and Libinput

  • Mir 1.6 Released With New Wayland, DispmanX Platform Support

    Mir 1.6 is out today with the latest batch of features for this Ubuntu-focused display server that offers Wayland client compatibility. The two big additions to Mir 1.6 are on the graphics platform front. First, there is now a "Wayland platform" for running Mir as a nested compositor on top of a Wayland compositor. Secondly, the rpi-dispmanx platform is for Broadcom's DispmanX API.

  • Before Ending 2019, Vintage SiS X.Org Driver Sees A New Release

    xf86-video-sis 0.12.0 is available this week as a new version of the SiS display driver for X.Org systems in supporting Silicon Integrated Systems' display hardware. This X.Org user-space mode-setting driver has seen its first update in four months but prior to that it hadn't seen any update to the open-source code in three years.

  • RadeonSI Lands SDMA Copy Support For Vega/GFX9

    The RadeonSI Gallium3D driver has finally landed SDMA copy support for Vega/GFX9 graphics hardware, which should principally benefit compute shaders and other cases.

  • AMD's GPUOpen Releases Vulkan Memory Allocator 2.3

    AMD's GPUOpen team has released their first official update to the open-source Vulkan Memory Allocator project in nearly one year. Vulkan Memory Allocator is an easy-to-use Vulkan memory allocation library that in the two and a half years since being open-sourced has been picked up for use by multiple games/engineers, Vulkan code samples, and other projects.

  • Chromium's Ozone Wayland Back-End Is Now Considered Beta, Aiming To Ship Next Year

    For years there has been work on a Wayland back-end to Ozone, the Google component for abstracting user-interface elements and input/window handling among other tasks across platforms. It looks like in 2020 the Ozone Wayland support will be in good standing and promoted out of beta. We were tipped off to a recent presentation by Igalia's Alexander Dunaev on their work contributing to the Ozone Wayland code. From consulting firm Igalia's perspective, they have been focused on bringing up Ozone Wayland support in the embedded Linux context considering the number of consumer devices now shipping that use Wayland and Chromium or CEF. But all their embedded Linux work for Ozone Wayland also benefits the Linux desktop.

  • Mesa Developers Weigh Renaming Gallium "State Tracker" To "API"

    Gallium3D state tracker terminology has been around a decade now in referring to the portions of the architecture that are ultimately implementing various graphics / compute / video APIs. Marek proposed keeping the Mesa OpenGL state tracker term but in renaming the other state trackers to being "API implementations" as that terminology is technically more accurate for the likes of Clover OpenCL, VA-API, VDPAU, and the other state trackers / APIs implemented.

  • Lima Gets Tiling While Vulkan Turnip Lands SSBO + Compute Shaders

    The Lima Gallium3D driver that supports older Mali 400/450 hardware with an open-source OpenGL driver hasn't been seeing too many improvements these days compared to the likes of the Panfrost Gallium3D driver for the newer Arm Mali Bifrost/Midgard architectures. But hitting Mesa 20.0-devel yesterday was tiling support for Lima. This should improve the performance for this open-source Mali driver and also end up working around the driver's broken mipmapping support for linear textures.

  • Libinput 1.15 Is On Approach With Various Improvements/Fixes For Linux Input Handling

    Peter Hutterer has been preparing libinput 1.15 as the next update to this open-source input handling library used by Linux systems both on X.Org and Wayland. Compared to past releases that have seen exciting changes on supporting new input devices like the Dell Totem, scrolling enhancements, and other major additions, there isn't too much of that with libinput 1.15.

Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye" Installer Is Now Available for Public Testing

Unveiled earlier this year during the DebConf19 conference, Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye" will be the next major release of the acclaimed Linux-based operating system used by millions of computer users around the globe. It's development kicked off a few months ago, so now it's time to test drive the very first alpha build of the Debian Bullseye Installer. "It's high time we started doing this: many components were updated, replacing “CD”/“CD-ROM” with “installation media”. Such changes are not documented individually below. That also explains why many languages are not fully translated in this alpha release," said Cyril Brulebois on behalf of the Debian release team. Read more

Python Programming and This Week in Rust

  • Adding Notifications to Long-Running Jupyter Notebook Cells

    If you use Jupyter Notebook to run long-running processes, such as machine learning training, then you would probably like to know when the cell finishes executing. There is a neat browser plugin that you can use to help solve this issue called jupyter-notify. It will allow you to have your browser send a pop-up message when the cell finishes executing.

  • #100DaysOfCode, Day 015 – Quick and Dirty Web Page Download

    I wanted to write a program that would just get the latest comic from turnoff.us and save the picture to a file.

  • Mozilla and Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to support pip
  • Creating Palindromes -- if possible -- from a string of letters.

    I don't like the idea of Union[str, int] as a return type from this function. Yes, it's valid Python, but it seems like a code smell. Since the intent is to build lists, a None would be more sensible than a number; we'd have Optional[str] which seems better overall. The solution that was posted was interesting. It did way too much work, but it was acceptable-looking Python. (It started with a big block comment with "#" on each line instead of a docstring, so... there were minor style problems, but otherwise, it was not bad.)

  • Functional programming design pattern: Nested Iterators == Flattening

    Here's a functional programming design pattern I uncovered. This may not be news to you, but it was a surprise to me. It cropped up when looking at something that needs parallelization to reduced the elapsed run time.

  • List Comprehensions in Python

    A list is one of the fundamental data types in Python. Every time you come across a variable name that's followed by a square bracket [], or a list constructor, it is a list capable of containing multiple items, making it a compound data type. Similarly, it is also a breeze to declare a new list and subsequently add one or more items to it.

  • Python if else demo

    A simple kata from codewars will show us how to use the if-else statement in python. The wide mouth frog is particularly interested in the eating habits of other creatures. He just can’t stop asking the creatures he encounters what they like to eat. But then he meets the alligator who just LOVES to eat wide-mouthed frogs! When he meets the alligator, it then makes a tiny mouth.

  • This Week in Rust 315

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.