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Canonical introduces Charmed OSM to enable telcos with network functions management and orchestration

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Ubuntu

Canonical, the publishers of Ubuntu, today announced Charmed OSM – a pure upstream Open Source MANO (OSM) distribution designed for production-grade, highly available and scalable deployments. Charmed OSM provides telecommunications service providers (TSPs) with a generic approach to network functions management and orchestration, allowing them to benefit from cost reduction resulting from the adoption of network functions virtualisation (NFV) technology.

Charmed OSM is a pure upstream OSM distribution. Telcos are assured of a predictable release cadence and upgrade path as Charmed OSM will be released within two weeks of the upstream, enabling them to benefit from the latest features. Charmed OSM is supported under Ubuntu Advantage to provide critical security patches, 24/7 support and production-grade SLAs for maximum uptime and stability.

“OSM allows TSPs to move from traditional, legacy networking services to cloud-native network functions and benefit from reduced CAPEX and OPEX, and DevOps agility,” said Tytus Kurek, Product Manager for Charmed OSM at Canonical. “However, telcos need an OSM distribution that is stable, secure, supported and easy to operate. Charmed OSM brings all of that together, enabling a smooth transition and painless adoption.”

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Also: Canonical Releases Charmed OSM As Its Latest Enterprise Push

Canonical intros OSM distributon platform for telco NFV

  • Canonical intros OSM distributon platform for telco NFV

    Canonical, the publishers of Ubuntu, announced Charmed OSM, a new platform for telecom operators to virtualise network functions. Charmed is a pure upstream Open Source MANO (OSM) distribution, providing a generic platform to develop NFV.

    Operators can be assured of a predictable release cadence and upgrade path as Charmed OSM will be released within two weeks of the upstream, enabling them to benefit from the latest features, Canonical said. The platform is supported under the Ubuntu Advantage to provide critical security patches, 24/7 support and production-grade SLAs for maximum uptime and stability.

    The company claims providers can reduce deployment times of complex OSM clusters from weeks to hours in an automated process with Juju, the application modelling tool offered with Charmed. Juju charms are collections of scripts and metadata which contain all necessary logic required to install, configure and connect applications.

8th OSM Hackfest: the highlights

  • 8th OSM Hackfest: the highlights

    The 8th OSM Hackfest is over, but the OSM (Open Source MANO) project continues to evolve and is now looking forward to landing release SEVEN. It was an exciting week in Lucca, Italy. We’ve seen a lot of interest from those who attended the event for the first time and a strong commitment from the community to drive the project towards new challenges.

    This was also an important week for Canonical as we’ve officially launched our own distribution – Charmed OSM!

    [...]

    By delegating an experienced team of telco experts, Canonical delivered a plenary session about native charms and a presentation about CNF (container network function) workloads deployment with Juju K8s charms, a feature that is expected in OSM release SEVEN. The session about native charms followed with a brief update on a new charm tech framework. The charm tech framework is event-based which makes charming experience much more intuitive. An example of how to migrate from the reactive framework to the new framework was provided too. The charm tech framework is coming with Juju 2.7 release.

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