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“2007: the year of open source”

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OSS

David Plain, Practice Manager for Novell in Scotland, believes that 2007 will be the year open source software proves its commercial viability in the wider marketplace.

Speaking exclusively to Hi-Tech Scotland, Plain said: "What started off in the early 1990s as a curiosity, in the domain of the technical gurus, has developed into a powerful market force in the 21st century. Open source products have reached the point where they are known by their 'brand' and not the fact that they are open source - take Apache and MySQL for example - two of the most commonly used products by web hosting companies across the world. Open source is here to stay.

"There's no doubt that certain open source solutions have reached a maturity that makes them viable alternatives to commercial software. Products such as OpenOffice are providing real cost savings to companies over the traditional commercial office applications. One fundamental component of this maturity is the provision of professional support services from companies like Novell."

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