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KDE: LaKademy 2019, KDE Frameworks 6, Plasma and Krita

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KDE

  • Aracele Torres: My participation in LaKademy 2019

    Hi, people! Here I am again telling about how I love this community and like to be part of every activity we organize. Almost two weeks ago we had a new edition of LaKademy, the Latin American KDE Summit, which we’ve been organizing in Brazil since 2012. This edition was held in Salvador, Bahia, for the second time (the 2015 edition was there too).

  • KDE Frameworks 6 sprint

    Last week I took a train to Berlin for the KDE Frameworks 6 kickoff sprint. A lot has been said about it by my fellow attendees already, so I won’t go into detail much.

    Work on Qt 6 has begun and with Qt 6 a version 6 of the KDE Frameworks is due. This will gives us the opportunity to clean up and redesign some of our API.

    Main goal for the sprint was to discuss the major design principles for KF6. I personally focussed on two aspects. First, we want to better separate logic from the user interface to allow different UI implementations for desktop and mobile uses. Futhermore, we want to reduce the amount of dependencies our libraries have. While we are doing fine for a lot of frameworks some have very ugly dependency structures. Probably our worst offender here is KIO, the framework that powers Dolphin and many more KDE applications.

  • Plasma Edit Mode refinements

    Editing, moving and customizing widgets in Plasma Desktop improved a lot in 5.17, and then in 5.18 it will get a brand new edit mode, to be really efficient editing your desktop layout (and have less visual noise by default).

    This week another new feature landed in the edit mode for 5.18: it’s possible to set some plasmoids without background and a nice drop shadow, for an extra clean and modern look for your desktop.

    In addition, a plasmoid can specify this backgroundless shadowed mode as its new default, like the digital clock now does (when is on the deskop)

  • Krita Weekly #4

    Phew, I am late this week for the update, kudos to my university exams nevertheless better be late than never. One more week passed, we are now closing on the 4.2.8 release. This week too we can see a steady decrease in the number of bugs. 17 bugs were reported and 23 were fixed, a net decrease of 6 bugs. The rate has gone down a little bit compared to the previous month, cause the folks are now mostly focusing on the resource rewrite.

  • Krita Weekly #5

    This week we got 13 new bug reports while 22 got fixed, a net decrease of 9 bugs. The bug tracker says that there are about 415 bugs remaining, so still a long way to go. And last week the 4.2.8 beta was released. Thanks to all the folks who participated in testing it. You can expect the 4.2.8 release this Wednesday.

    [...]

    Ivan fixed some inconsistency in the visuals of the line endings. And coming to the resource rewrite, Boud has been working on to make document storage work like bundles. Tiar has been busy with tagging, a working combobox can be found in the corresponding branch to filter resources. And Wolthera has been dabbing with the storage widget ui. Collectively they also fixed some missing parts of the API involved with the resources.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Mike Hoye: Navigational Instruments

    A decade ago I got to sit in on a talk by one of the designers of Microsoft Office who’d worked on the transition to the new Ribbon user interface. There was a lot to learn there, but the most interesting thing was when he explained the core rationale for the redesign: of the top ten new feature requests for Office, every year, six to eight of them were already features built into the product, and had been for at least one previous version. They’d already built all this stuff people kept saying they wanted, and nobody could find it to use it. It comes up periodically at my job that we have the same problem; there are so many useful features in Firefox that approximately nobody knows about, even people who’ve been using the browser every day and soaking in the codebase for years. People who work here still find themselves saying “wait, you can do that?” when a colleague shows them some novel feature or way to get around the browser that hasn’t seen a lot of daylight. In the hopes of putting this particular peeve to bed, I did a casual survey the other day of people’s favorite examples of underknown or underappreciated features in the product, and I’ve collected a bunch of them here. These aren’t Add-ons, as great as they are; this is what you get from Firefox out of the proverbial box. I’m going to say “Alt” and “Ctrl” a lot here, because I live in PC land, but if you’re on a Mac those are “Option” and “Command” respectively. Starting at the top, one of the biggest differences between Firefox and basically everything else out there is right there at the top of the window, the address bar that we call the Quantumbar.

  • FFQueue – SparkyLinux

    There is a new application available for Sparkers: FFQueue

  • How to install the PurpIE Gnome Shell theme on Linux

    PurpIE (AKA Rounded-Rectangle-Purple) is a Gnome Shell theme that turns your Gnome desktop from the basic black/grey/blue colors to a refreshing purple. In this guide, we’ll show you how to install PurpIE and set it up as the default theme.

Programming: Cutelyst, C/C++, Perl and Python

  • Cutelyst 2.13 and ASql 0.19 released – Dantti's Blog

    Cutelyst the C++/Qt Web Framework and ASql the ASync SQL library for Qt applications got new versions. Thanks to the work on ASql Cutelyst got some significant performance improvements on async requests, as well as a new class called ASync, which automatically detaches the current request from the processing chain, and attaches later on when it goes out of scope. With the ASync class you capture it on your ASql lambda and once the query result arrives and the lambda is freed and the ASync object gets out of scope and continues the processing action chain.

  • LLVM Lands Very Basic Support For AMD Zen 3 CPUs

    While AMD has landed Znver3 support in GNU Binutils, the company hasn't yet sent out patches for either the GCC or LLVM/Clang compilers in setting up the Zen 3 target with its new instructions or optimized scheduling model / cost table. But a basic implementation has been merged to LLVM for allowing "-march=znver3" based on the limited public details thus far. Merged to mainline LLVM 12 yesterday was a basic implementation allowing for -march=znver3 targeting that basically flips on the new instructions known to be supported by Zen 3. Beyond Zen 2, it flips on INVPCID, PKU, VAES, and VPCLMULQDQ. There are also a few other instructions supported by Zen 3 as outlined in this earlier article.

  • CY's Take on PWC#083 | Moments on Perl or other Programming Issues [blogs.perl.org]

    I found that I use "and/or" quite frequently in writing. I know, (mathematical-)logically we only need "or". It seems to me to be a language tricky part as the use of gender neutral terms.

  • Warning about Python3 update in latest -current | Alien Pastures

    Warning for people running Slackware-current and have 3rd party packages installed (who doesn’t) that depend on Python3. That includes you who are running KDE Plasma5! The “Sun Oct 25 18:05:51 UTC 2020” update in Slackware-current comes with a bump in the Python3 version (to 3.9) which is incompatible with software which already has been compiled against an older version of Python3 (like 3.8). I found 26 of my own packages on my laptop that depend on Python3 and they are all probably going to break when upgrading to the latest slackware-current. This includes Plasma5 ‘ktown’ packages but also several of my DAW packages.

System76's Pop!_OS 20.10 and More Preinstalled GNU/Linux

  • Pop!_OS 20.10

    Today we are looking at Pop!_OS 20.10.  It is based on Ubuntu 20.10, Linux Kernel 5.8, Gnome 3.38, and uses about 1.1GB of ram when idling.  

  • Pop!_OS 20.10 Run Through - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at Pop!_OS 20.10. 

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  • This Linux laptop is a beast - Juno Computers Neptune 15 First Impressions

    I received this beast on tuesday. It's made by a company you might not have heard of, called Juno computers. They operate ouf of London, and much like Slimbook or Tuxedo, they offer laptops based on Clevo designs, as well as desktops. Disclaimer: I haven't received any money for this video, and I don't get to keep the laptop either, so be nice ;)

ScummVM Android Love

Our new and shiny Android port for ScummVM v2.2.1 is now live on the Google Play Store. After quite a long period of dedicated work from our team developers, and a month of public beta testing by members of our community who helpfully reported quite a few issues for us to address, we are finally ready to give you the stable release for our ScummVM Android app. This app has been significantly re-written and tested on modern Android devices, running up to Android 10+. It includes new features which bring it up to speed with the desktop ScummVM application, such as FluidSynth support, Cloud Saves and more localization choices for the UI. Also included is the Local File Server (LAN) feature, whereby your device can act as a temporary file server allowing you to download files (eg. save files and even the config file) or upload new ones (eg. game data) using a web browser from a PC or another client. Read more